ANTH 226: ETHNOGRAPHY OF LATIN AMERICA & The CARIBBEAN

Department of Anthropology, SUNY Geneseo

Fall 2015

 

 

Instructor: Dr. Melanie Medeiros

Email: medeiros@geneseo.edu

Class Meeting Times: Mondays and Wednesdays 10-11:15am

Office hours (Bailey 106): Mondays and Wednesdays 2:30-4:00pm

            - You may also email me to make an appointment (at least 3 days in advance).

 

COURSE DESCRIPTION

This course takes an anthropological approach to the study of Latin America and the Caribbean. It explores the people and culture of the region pre-contact with Europeans, examines conquest and colonialism, and takes an in-depth ethnographic approach to study contemporary regional themes and issues, such as: popular culture, food and culture, race and ethnicity, gender and sexuality, human rights, social movements, globalization, tourism, the environment, multiculturalism, indigenous politics, urbanization, religion, and health and coping with illness.

 

Learning Outcomes:

A Participatory Learning Environment

This course deals with sensitive topics and material. Please be respectful of your classmates -- listen with interest and be open to ideas and opinions that may differ from your own. Treat your classmates just as you would like to be treated in classroom and online discussions. This class should be a comfortable and open environment for you to learn, so please contribute to that environment.

Although this course already has objectives and a structure, I encourage your input on its direction.  Please email me if you have any particular topic you are interested in learning more about, an assignment or project not listed in the syllabus that you would be interested in doing (to replace one already listed), etc.  I will do my best to accommodate student requests, but cannot guarantee that I will be able to fulfill all of them.


 

Required Textbooks:

-       Harry Sanabria. 2007. Anthropology of Latin America and the Caribbean. 

-     Additional Reading Assignments will be posted to myCourses

 

ASSIGNMENTS

Detailed descriptions of all these assignments are available on the course website.

 

I. Required Reading  [Complete before coming to class]

The reading and video/film assignments are mandatory. You should be prepared to discuss these assignments in class and in their written assignments. The completion of all the reading assignments is essential to receiving a good grade in this class.

 

II. Map Quiz, 5%

           

You will be asked to identify countries, capitals and major geographical features of Latin America and the Caribbean.

 

III. Weekly Reading Tests, 20%

Every week you will be required to take an online short exam to test your comprehension of the week’s reading assignments. The exams are available under myCourses/Course Materials/Exams. The exams will become available at 6pm and must be completed by 11:59pm on the Tuesday of the corresponding week. The exams will consist of multiple choice, matching and True/False questions. You will have 30 minutes to complete each short exam.

 

IV. Class Guest Lecture Presentation, 15%

Once in the semester you will be asked to "guest lecture" for a class. You will speak for 10 - 15    minutes on a topic that I assign to you. The topic will come from the assigned reading, but you      are expected to do some additional research to give the class more information. Power points   or handouts are not required but they are suggested.  You will be graded on how well you      understand the material and the quality of your presentation. See the assignment description on myCourses for details.

 

V. Book Review, 15%

Select one ethnography from the approved list of books (on myCourses). Read the ethnography and write a 3-5 page (1 inch margins, 12 point Times New Roman font, double spaced) book review. See the assignment description on myCourses for details.

 

VI. Mid-term Exam, 15%

 

VII. Final Exam, 20%

 

VI. Attendance and Participation, 10%

In order to succeed in this course you must participate in class discussion and class activities.

 

Grade Structure

Map Quiz: 5%

Weekly Reading Tests: 20%

Class Guest Lecture Presentation: 15%

Book Review: 15%

Mid-term Exam: 15%

Final Exam: 20%

Attendance and Participation: 10%

Total: 100%

 

Standard Grade Curve:

A (94-100%): Exceptional work: Meets all the course requirements and demonstrates exceptional comprehension and application of the material; also demonstrates strong writing, analytical and communication skills.

A – (90-93.99%): Excellent work: Meets all the course requirements and demonstrates excellent comprehension and application of the material; also demonstrates strong writing, analytical and communication skills.

B+  (87-89.99%): Great work: Meets all the course requirements and demonstrates very good comprehension and application of the material; also demonstrates adequate writing, analytical and communication skills.

B (83-86.99%): Very good work: Meets all the course requirements and demonstrates good comprehension and application of the material; also demonstrates adequate writing, analytical and communication skills.

B- (80-82.99%): Good work: Meets all the course requirements and demonstrates good comprehension and application of the material; demonstrates adequate writing, analytical and communication skills.

C+ (77-79.99%): Satisfactory work: Meets all course requirements and demonstrates comprehension and application of the material

C (73-76.99%): Farley satisfactory work: Meets all course requirements.

C- (70-72.99%): Work demonstrating minimal competence: Meets some, but not all the course requirements.

D  (65-69.99%): Marginal work: Meets few of the course requirements.

E  (0-64.9%): Inadequate work: Does not meet course requirements.

 

 

Plagiarism constitutes a violation of academic honesty and will be dealt with very strictly. Plagiarism is the representation of someone else’s words or ideas as one’s own, or the arrangement of someone else’s material(s) as one’s own. Such misrepresentation may be sufficient grounds for a student’s receiving a grade of E for the paper or presentation involved or may result in an E being assigned as the final grade for the course.


Any one of the following constitutes evidence of plagiarism:
1. direct quotation without identifying punctuation and citation of source;
2. paraphrase of expression or thought without proper attribution;
3. unacknowledged dependence upon a source in plan, organization, or argument.

 

You can read the college's academic dishonesty and plagiarism policy on-line at: http://www.geneseo.edu/dean_office/dishonesty.

 

It is your responsibility to complete course requirements to pass this course.  Please contact me if you are having problems with the course assignments as soon as possible.  I have office hours on Mondays from 2:30-3:45pm and Wednesdays from 2:30-4:15pm. If you are not able to meet on those days/times please email me to schedule an appointment for another time.

 

Accommodations: SUNY Geneseo will make reasonable accommodations for persons with documented physical, emotional, or cognitive disabilities.  Accommodations will be made for medical conditions related to pregnancy or parenting. Students should contact Dean Buggie-Hunt in the Office of Disability Services (tbuggieh@geneseo.edu or 585-245-5112) and their faculty to discuss needed accommodations as early as possible in the semester.

 

LAPTOP / TABLET / CELL PHONE POLICY

In this class, the use cell phones is prohibited. Phones should not be out on students’ desks or laps. If a student is witnessed using their cell phone or it visible, they will be considered absent for that class. The use of Facebook, You Tube, Vimeo and other media that does not pertain to this class is prohibited as well.

 

 

COURSE OUTLINE

 

 

 

Class 1) Monday, 8/31                     Introduction

 

Class 2) Wednesday, 9/2                  Anthropology, Latin America and the Caribbean

-       Read: Sanabria, Harry. 2007. Chapter 1. In Anthropology of Latin America and the Caribbean. Pearson. Pp. 1-15.

-       Assignment: Take Exam #1 by 11:59 pm on Tuesday, 9/1 (the exam is available at 6pm on Tuesday)

 

Monday, 9/7               LABOR DAY: NO CLASS

 

Class 3) Wednesday, 9/9                  Introducing Latin America and the Caribbean

 

- Read: Sanabria, Harry. 2007. Chapter 2. In Anthropology of Latin America and the Caribbean. Pearson.  Pp. 17-47.

 

Class 4) Monday, 9/14                      Society and Culture Before The Europeans

 

- Read: Sanabria, Harry. 2007. Chapter 3. In Anthropology of Latin America and the Caribbean. Pearson.  Pp. 50-74..

 

Class 5) Wednesday, 9/16                Conquest, Colonialism, and Resistance Part 1

 

- Read: Sanabria, Harry. 2007. Chapter 4. In Anthropology of Latin America and the Caribbean. Pearson.  Pp. 76-91.

 

 

Class 6) Monday, 9/21                      Conquest, Colonialism, and Resistance Part 2

 

- Read: Sanabria, Harry. 2007. Chapter 4. In Anthropology of Latin America and the Caribbean. Pearson.  Pp. 92-107.

 

 

Class 7) Wednesday, 9/23                Cultural Politics of Race and Ethnicity Part 1

 

- Read: Sanabria, Harry. 2007. Chapter 5. In Anthropology of Latin America and the Caribbean. Pearson.  Pp. 110-124.

 

Class 8) Monday, 9/28                      Cultural Politics of Race and Ethnicity Part 2

 

- Read: Sanabria, Harry. 2007. Chapter 5. In Anthropology of Latin America and the Caribbean. Pearson.  Pp. 125-144.

 

Class 9) Wednesday, 9/30                Cultural Politics of Race and Ethnicity: BRAZIL

 

- Read: TBD  

 

Class 10) Monday, 10/5                  Cultural Politics of Race and Ethnicity: Cuba

 

- Read: Henry Louis Gates, Jr. Chapters 4-6 in Black in Latin America pp. TBD

 

Class 11) Wednesday, 10/7             Cultural Politics of Race and Ethnicity: Haiti & the Dominican Republic

 

- Read: Henry Louis Gates, Jr. Chapters 4-6 in Black in Latin America pp. TBD

 

 

Monday, 10/12                    FALL BREAK: NO CLASS

 

           

Class 12) Wednesday 10/14             Cultural Constructions of Gender and Sexuality

 

- Read: Sanabria, Harry. 2007. Chapter 6. In Anthropology of Latin America and the Caribbean. Pearson.  Pp. 146-159.

 

Class 13) Monday, 10/19                  Cultural Constructions of Gender and Sexuality

                                                                       

- Read: Sanabria, Harry. 2007. Chapter 6. In Anthropology of Latin America and the Caribbean. Pearson.  Pp. 161-179.

 

Class 14) Wednesday, 10/21            Cultural Constructions of Gender and Sexuality: MEXICO

- Read: TBD

 

Class 15) Monday, 10/26                  Religion and Everyday Life: Popular Catholicism

 

- Read: Sanabria, Harry. 2007. Chapter 7. In Anthropology of Latin America and the Caribbean. Pearson.  Pp. 181-195.

 

 

Class 16) Wednesday, 10/28            Religion and Everyday Life: Protestantism & Espiritism

 

            - Read: Sanabria, Harry. 2007. Chapter 7. In Anthropology of Latin America and the Caribbean. Pearson.  Pp. 196-211.

 

Class 17) Monday, 11/2        `           Midterm Exam

 

 

Class 18) Wednesday, 11/4a            Violence, Memory, and Social Movements:  NICARAGUA, El Salvador and Guatemala

 

- Read: Sanabria, Harry. 2007. Chapter 12. In Anthropology of Latin America and the Caribbean. Pearson.  Pp. 351-360

 

 

Class 19) Monday, 11/9     Violence, Memory, and Social Movements: Argentina, Chile & COLOMBIA

 

- Read: Sanabria, Harry. 2007. Chapter 12. In Anthropology of Latin America and the Caribbean. Pearson.  Pp. 361-370

- In-class Film: Machuca  (2010)

 

 

Class 20) Wednesday, 11/11           Violence, Memory, and Social Movements: MEXICO & PERU

 

Read: Sanabria, Harry. 2007. Chapter 12. In Anthropology of Latin America and the Caribbean. Pearson.  Pp. 371-384

 

 

Class 21) Monday, 11/16                  Globalization, Tourism & Transnational Labor & Migration

 

- Read: Sanabria, Harry. 2007. Chapter 10. In Anthropology of Latin America and the Caribbean. Pearson.  Pp. 281-297.

                       

 

Class 22) Wednesday, 11/18            Globalization & the Environment: BOLIVIA

 

- Read: (1) Sanabria, Harry. 2007. Chapter 10. In Anthropology of Latin America and the Caribbean. Pearson.  Pp. 298-300.

(2) Albro, Robert 2005 'The Water is Ours, Carajo!' Deep Citizenship in Bolivia's Water War. In Social Movements. An Anthropological Reader. J. Nash, ed. Pp. 249-271. Oxford: Blackwell Publishing. 

 

- In-class Film: También la lluvia [Even the Rain] (2010)

 

 

Class 23) Monday, 11/23                  Urbanization & Violence: BRAZIL

Themes:  Neoliberal City; Urbanization and Urban Life: Crime, Violence, and Poverty

 

- Read: TBD

- Film: Cidade de Deus [City of God] (2002). (Attending class is optional: Students can choose to watch the film during the class time or rent and watch from home. Do the reading even if you do not come to class!!!)

 

 

Wednesday, 11/25     THANKGIVING BREAK

 

Class 24) Monday 11/30                   Health and Coping with Illness Part 1

 

- Read: Sanabria, Harry. 2007. Chapter 8. In Anthropology of Latin America and the Caribbean. Pearson.  Pp. 214-235.

 

 

Class 25) Wednesday, 12/2              Health and Coping with Illness Part 2

 

- Read: Sanabria, Harry. 2007. Chapter 8. In Anthropology of Latin America and the Caribbean. Pearson.  Pp. 236-249.

 

 

Class 26) Monday, 12/7                    Manifestations of Popular Culture Part 1

 

- Read: Sanabria, Harry. 2007. Chapter 11. In Anthropology of Latin America and the Caribbean. Pearson.  Pp. 314-331.

 

-Assignment: Answer Discussion Question #10 by 6pm on Sunday 12/7. Post comments to your group members discussion question responses by 1pm on Monday, 12/8.

 

Class 27) Wednesday, 12/9              Manifestations of Popular Culture Part 2

 

- Read: Sanabria, Harry. 2007. Chapter 11. In Anthropology of Latin America and the Caribbean. Pearson.  Pp. 332-349.

 

 

Class 28) Monday, 12/ 14                 Food, Cuisine and Popular Culture

 

-       Read: Sanabria, Harry. 2007. Chapter 9. In Anthropology of Latin America and the Caribbean. Pearson.  Pp. 250-279.

 

             

FINAL EXAM:  Wednesday 12/16 from 3:30-6:30

 

NOTE: This syllabus is subject to change. Reading, film and written assignments may be removed or added when the instructor believes it necessary for the course.