ANTHROPOLOGY 313

GLOBAL HEALTH ISSUES

SPRING 2015


 

 

Instructor: Dr. Melanie Medeiros

Email: medeiros@geneseo.edu

Class Meeting: Tuesday & Thursday 1:00-2:15pm, Bailey 201

Office hours: Thursdays: 10am-1pm

          You may also email me to make an appointment.

 

COURSE DESCRIPTION

This course examines the effects of globalization on the health of people around the globe and relates disparities in the spread of preventable diseases and access to basic health services to the growing inequality between rich and poor nations. Some of the issues explored include the repercussions of the HIV/AIDS pandemic; the emergence and impact of new illnesses; the feminization of poverty and its impact on the health of children; and the effects of political repression and violence. The theoretical perspective used to analyze these issues draws on the work of applied and public anthropologists as well as the literature on globalization, public health, race, ethnic and gender politics.

 

Learning Outcomes

  • Students will demonstrate in-depth knowledge of global health issues and global engagement, through weekly written discussion question responses, in-class discussions, and a research project and presentation.
  • Students will demonstrate critical thinking and communication skills as they analyze and evaluate studies of health related issues using an approach based on Critical Medical Anthropology, through weekly written discussion question responses, in-class discussions and a research project and presentation.
  • Students will demonstrate informational and digital literacy, creative expression, and the ability the ability to synthesize, connect, and draw conclusions from multiple perspectives to address global health issues in a comprehensive research project and presentation.

REQUIRED TEXTBOOKS

  • Singer, M. and P. Erickson. 2013. Global Health.
  • J. Biehl , J. and A. Petryna, eds. 2013. When People Come First: Critical Studies in Global Health.
  • Maternowska, M. Catherine. 2006. Reproducing Inequities: Poverty and the Politics of Population in Haiti. 2006.
  • Holmes, Seth. 2013. Fresh Fruit, Broken Bodies.
  • Additional Reading Assignments will be posted to myCourses

 

ASSIGNMENTS

Detailed descriptions of all these assignments are available on the course website.

 

Required Reading  [Complete before coming to class]

The reading and video/film assignments are mandatory. You should be prepared to discuss these assignments in class and in their written assignments. The completion of all the reading assignments is essential to receiving a good grade in this class.

 

In-Class Attendance and Participation, 15 points

 

In order to succeed in this course you must participate in class discussion and class activities. If you miss more than 2 classes with unexcused absences, your grade in this course will decrease by a letter grade.

 

Online Discussion Question Responses (DQRs), 70 points

 

You must answer all 14 weekly discussion questions and post your responses (DQRs) to the myCourses discussion board by 6pm on the Wednesday before class. You will be assigned to a discussion group and will post your responses under your group’s discussion forum on myCourses.  For example, if you are in Group One and answering the discussion question assigned for Thursday, 1/22, you would post your response to 'Course Materials/Discussion Forums/Discussion Group 1/Discussion Question #1.' 

 

Responses should be approximately 400 words, must demonstrate comprehension of the material, cite examples and/or ideas from all the material covered in the reading assignments, and be well-written (with no grammatical errors). You must use proper AAA citation formatting in your discussion posts and include a Works Cited section at the bottom of your post. See the “Citation and References Guide” for guidance. There is also an example of an excellent Discussion Question Response posted to myCourses under “Discussion Question Response Assignment Description.” Late Discussion Posts (anytime after 6pm Wednesday) will be given zero points.

Grading Rubric for Discussion Question Responses (15 Responses, 0-75 points total)

  • 5 Points = Excellent response: Meets all the requirements listed above and demonstrates exceptional comprehension and application of the material.
  • 4.5 Points = Very Good response: Meets all the requirements listed above.
  • 4 Points= Good Response: Meets most of the requirements listed.
  • 3.5 Points = Satisfactory response: Meets few of the requirements listed.
  • 0-3 Points = Unsatisfactory response: Does not meet the requirements listed. Or no response: Late posts will be given 0 points.

 

 

Online Group Discussion, 10 points

 

Every week you will read ALL the Discussion Question Responses (DQRs) of your discussion group members. Then you will write a discussion comment to contribute to their response (approximately 100 word discussion comments for each group member's response).  If a classmate's DQR makes you consider the material in a new way or makes you think of new examples then make sure to include that in your comments.  Participation in online discussion is required, and comments should be thoughtful and relevant responses to other students' discussion question responses.

 

Student-Led Discussion, 30 points

 

Twice in the semester each student (in pairs of two) will co-lead a 20-minute discussion about the day’s reading assignments. Student-led discussions should highlight your own perspectives on a particular reading. On the day you are assigned to lead a discussion, your team should come prepared with: 1) A brief summary/explanation of the reading that highlights a specific aspect of the author’s discussion and why you find this issue of interest in the context of this class. Why is this issue relevant? Can you link it to a particular theoretical perspective? To other readings? 2) Prepare a few questions and comments to engage us in exploring these ideas. I am available to meet with you before your scheduled presentation if you wish to discuss some ideas. 3) Email me with an annotated bibliography and discussion outline by 8:00 am on the day of your presentation. If you use plan to use multimedia (power point, film, etc.) then your presentation should be sent to me by 8am. [If using Power Point, create slides that are 16:9 (widescreen) by going to Themes/Slide Size].

 

“Who Is Dayani Cristal” Film Attendance & Short Essay [2/19, 2/26], 20 points

Attend the screening of the film “Who Is Dayani Cristal” and the post film discussion on Thursday, 2/19 at 7pm. Write a 1 page single-spaced (1-inch margins, 12pt Times New Roman font) short essay on the film and discussion. Questions will be posted in class on the day of the screening to help guide you in writing your essay. The essay is due in class on 2/26.

 

Research Project (5/11), 40 points

For your Research Paper/Project, you will submit a 200-word proposal (Due 3/24) stating 1) the type of             paper/project you will complete, 2) research questions and/or potential thesis statement, 3) some of the literature you will be using and citing in your paper. The description and details of this assignment are available in the file "Paper/Project Assignment Description" at myCourses/Course Materials/Research Paper or Project/].

                        Option 1: 3000-word Paper. Must be typed, double-spaced, 12-point Times New Roman     font, with 1-inch margins. [See "Paper/Project Outline Guide" at myCourses/Course        Materials/Self-Ethnography Paper or Project/Writing Tools/].

 

                        Option 2: Poster Presentation. Posters should contain at least 2,500 words of                                           text and images, and be presented in a visually appealing way [See an example of a                                          Research Poster at myCourses/Course Materials/Self-Ethnography Paper or Project/Sample                            Poster and Film].

 

Group Research Presentation [During the Final Exam Period, Monday 5/11 from 12-3pm], 15 points

Each group will give a 15-minute presentation on their research project. The presentation should describe the group’s main findings of their individual research projects. If you use multimedia (power point, film, etc.) then your presentation should be sent to me by 8am on 5/11 to minimize the transition time between presentations. [If using Power Point, create slides that are 16:9 (widescreen) by going to Themes/Slide Size].

 

Extra Credit

(1)  Attend a library plagiarism workshop by February 28th and receive 1 point of extra credit. Visit the library website for the schedule of workshops. https://www.geneseo.edu/library/library-workshops.

(2) Attend an approved (by the professor) film viewing, play, or speaker presentation and write a 1 page (single-spaced, 1 inch margins, 12 point Times New Roman font) describing the content of the film/play/talk and how it relates to themes from the course.  The response essay is due 1 week after the event. You may receive up to 2 points of extra credit for each essay.

 

Assignments must be completed by the start of class on the due date. Late assignments will be marked down one letter grade for each day late (day= 5 minutes past the start of class on the due date). It is your responsibility to complete course requirements to pass this course.  Please contact me if you are having problems with the course assignments as soon as possible.

 

COURSE GRADING POLICY

Attendance and Participation: 15 points

Online Discussion Question Responses: 70 points

Online Group Discussion: 10 points

“Who Is Dayani Cristal” Film Attendance & Short Essay: 20 points

Student-led Discussion: 30 points

Research Project: 40 points

Research Presentation: 15 points                   

TOTAL: 200 points (100%)

 

Standard Grade Curve:

Earning 188-200 points = A (94 - 100%)

Earning 180-187.5 points = A- (90 - 93.75%)

Earning 174-179.5 points = B+ (87- 89.75%)

Earning 166-173.5 points = B (83 - 86.75%)

Earning 160- 165.5 points = B- (80 - 82.75%)

Earning 154- 159.5 points = C+ (77 - 79.75%)

Earning 146- 153.5 points = C  (73 - 76.75%)

Earning 140-145.5 points = C- (70 - 72.75%)

Earning 130-139.5 points = D (65 – 69.75%)

Earning 0-129.5 points = E (0 – 64.75%)

 

 

PLAGIARISM

 

Plagiarism constitutes a violation of academic honesty and will be dealt with very strictly. Plagiarism is the representation of someone else’s words or ideas as one’s own, or the arrangement of someone else’s material(s) as one’s own. Such misrepresentation may be sufficient grounds for a student’s receiving a grade of E for the paper or presentation involved or may result in an E being assigned as the final grade for the course.
Any one of the following constitutes evidence of plagiarism:
1. direct quotation without identifying punctuation and citation of source;
2. paraphrase of expression or thought without proper attribution;
3. unacknowledged dependence upon a source in plan, organization, or argument.

 

You can read the college's academic dishonesty and plagiarism policy on-line at: http://www.geneseo.edu/dean_office/dishonesty.

 

 

ACCOMODATIONS

SUNY Geneseo will make reasonable accommodations for persons with documented physical, emotional, or cognitive disabilities.  Accommodations will be made for medical conditions related to pregnancy or parenting. Students should contact Dean Buggie-Hunt in the Office of Disability Services (tbuggieh@geneseo.edu or 585-245-5112) and their faculty to discuss needed accommodations as early as possible in the semester.

 

 

LAPTOP / TABLET / CELL PHONE POLICY

In this class, the use of computers, tablets, cell phones and other electronics is prohibited. This is to ensure that the students around you are not distracted by what is on your screen. Phones should not be out on students’ desks or laps. If a student is witnessed using their cell phone or it visible, they will be considered absent for that class.

 

 

COURSE OUTLINE

 

 

 

Class 1) Tuesday, 1/20                           INTRODUCTION

 

Class 2) Thursday, 1/22                   AN ANTHROPOLOGICAL APPROACH TO GLOBAL HEALTH

Themes: Threats to global health, the mission of global health, contours of global health today, the anthropological approach

 

- Read: Singer and Erickson. 2013. Ch. 1. In Global Health.

- Assignment: Answer Discussion Question #1 by 6pm on Wednesday 1/21. Post comments to your group members' discussion question responses by 1pm on Thursday, 1/22.

 

 

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Class 3 Tuesday, 1/27                       THE IMPORTANCE OF CULTURE IN HEALTH

Themes: The Anthropological Lens, Health Inequities: Structural Causes/Structural Health Inequalities: Contextual Expressions/ The Emic Perspective and Subjective Experience

 

- Read: (1) Singer and Erickson. 2013. Ch. 2. In Global Health.

 

 

Class 4) Thursday, 1/29                   ENVIRONMENT AND GLOBALIZATION

Themes: Environmental Health, Global Warming, Storms and Disasters, Threats to the Air We Breathe, Poisons around us, Pluralea and the Human Health Future, Globalization and Health    

 

- Read: (1) Singer and Erickson. 2013. pages 35-51, 59-61 from Ch.3. Global Health

 

- Assignment: Answer Discussion Question #2 by 6pm on Wednesday 1/28. Post comments to your group members' discussion question responses by 1pm on Thursday, 1/29.

 

 

 

 

 

Class 5) Tuesday, 2/3                       CHRONIC DISEASE & SYNDEMICS

 

- Read: (1) Singer and Erickson. 2013. pages 54-57, 58-59 from Ch.3. Global Health.

(2) Whitmarsh, Ian. 2013. The Ascetic Subject of Compliance: The Turn to Chronic Diseases in Global Health. In When People Come First: Critical Studies in Global Health, J. Biehl and A. Petryna, eds.

                        Recommended:

Singer and Clair. 2003. Syndemics and Public Health: Reconceptualizing Disease in Bio-Social Context. Medical Anthropology Quarterly 17(4): 423-441.

Singer, M. 2011. Toward a Critical Biosocial Model of Ecohealth in Southern Africa: The HIV/AIDS And Nutrition Insecurity Syndemic. Annals of Anthropological Practice 35(1): 8-27.

Gonzalez-Guarda et al. 2012. Cultural Phenomena and the Syndemic Factor: Substance Abuse, Violence, HIV, and Depression Among Hispanic Women. Annals of Anthropological Practice 36(2): 212-231.

Romero-Daza, et al. 2012. Syndemic Theory as a Model for Training and Mentorship to Address HIV/AIDS Among Latinos in the U.S. Annals of Anthropological Practice 36(2): 232-256.

Halkitis et al. 2012. Evidence for a Syndemic in Aging HIV-Positive Gay, Bisexual and Other MSM: Implications for a Holistic Approach to Prevention and Health Care. Annals of Anthropological Practice 36(2): 365-386.

Kline, N. 2012. “There’s Nowhere I Can Go To Get Help, And I Have Tooth Pain Right Now: The Oral Health Syndemic Among Migrant Farmworkers in Florida. Annals of Anthropological Practice 36(2): 387-401.

 

 

Class 6) Thursday, 2/5                                 Case Study:  Diabetes

 

- Read: Everett and Wieland. 2012. Annals of Anthropological Practice 36(2): 295-311. [My Courses]

- Assignment: Answer Discussion Question #3 by 6pm on Wednesday 2/4. Post comments to your group members' discussion question responses by 1pm on Thursday, 2/5.

 

___________________________________________________________________________________

 

 

Class 7) Tuesday, 2/10                     BASIC SURVIVAL NEEDS AND THEIR PRIVATIZATION

 

Themes: Diet and Health in Human History/Knowing Hunger/Understanding Food Insecurity: The Anthropological Approach, Social Factors that Cause Food Insecurity, A Human Rights Approach to Food Security, Health and the Global Water Crisis, Health and the Privatization of Water, Healthcare and the Social Welfare Agenda.

 

- Read: Singer and Erickson. 2013.  Ch.4. Global Health                  

 

Class 8) Thursday, 2/12                                           Case Study: Food Insecurity

- Read: (1) Hadley et al. 2009. The Forgotten Population? Youth, Food Insecurity, And Rising Prices: Implications for the Global Food Crisis. Annals of Anthropological Practice 32(1): 77-91. [My Courses]

(2) Githinji, V. 2009. Food Insecurity in Buhaya: The Cycle of Women’s Marginalization and the Spread of Poverty, Hunger, and Disease. Annals of Anthropological Practice 32(1): 92-114. [My Courses]

                        Recommended:

Mazzeo et al. 2011. Introduction: Anthropologists Confront HIV/AIDS and Food Insecurity in Sub-Saharan Africa. Annals of Anthropological Practice 35(1): 1-7.

Sellen and Hadley. 2011. Food Insecurity and Maternal-to-Child Transmission of HIV and AIDS in Sub-Saharan Africa. Annals of Anthropological Practice 35(1): 28-49.

Maes and Shifferaw. 2011. Cycles of Poverty, Food Insecurity, and Psychosocial Stress Among AIDS Care Volunteers in Urban Ethiopia. Annals of Anthropological Practice 35(1): 98-115.

Brenton, B.P. 2011. Contested Strategies for Defining and Confronting Food Insecurity and HIV/AIDS in Zambia: Rejection of GM Food Aid During the 2002-03 Food Crisis. Annals of Anthropological Practice 35(1): 187-203.

Rodlach, A. 2011. “AIDS is in the food”: Zimbabweans’ Association Between Nutrition and HIV/AIDS and Their Potential For Addressing Food Insecurity and HIV/AIDS. Annals of Anthropological Practice 35(1): 219-237.

Maupin and Brewis. 2014. Food Insecurity and Body Norms Among Rural Guatemalan Schoolchildren. American Anthropologist 116(2): 332-337.

- Assignment: Answer Discussion Question #4 by 6pm on Wednesday 2/11. Post comments to your group members' discussion question responses by 1pm on Thursday, 2/12.

 

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Class 9) Tuesday, 2/17                     STRUCTURAL VIOLENCE

                       

- Read:  (1) Farmer et al. 2006. Structural Violence and Clinical Medicine. PLoS Medicine 3(10): 1686-1691. [My Courses]

(2) Vogt, Wendy. 2013. Crossing Mexico: Structural Violence and the Commodification of Undocumented Central American Migrants. American Ethnologist 40(4): 764-780. [My Courses]

                        Recommended:

Ellison, M. 2003. Authoritative Knowledge and Single Women’s Unintentional Pregnancies, Abortions, Adoption, and Single Motherhood: Social Stigma and Structural Violence. Medical Anthropology Quarterly 17(3): 322-347.

Hudgins, A. 2005. NGO Policy, Sex Workers and Structural Violence: Looking Beyond the Brothel Village. Voices 7(1): 9-12.

Benson, Peter. 2008. El Campo: Faciality and Structural Violence in Farm Labor Camps. Cultural Anthropology 23(4): 589-629.

Hill, J.D. 1989. Demystifying Structural Violence. The Journal of Latin American and Caribbean Anthropology 1(2): 42-48.

 

 

Class 10) Thursday, 2/19                 SOCIAL SUFFERING  

 

- Read: Holmes, Seth. Ch. 1 to 2, pp.1-44. Fresh Fruit Broken Bodies.

- Assignment: Answer Discussion Question #5 by 6pm on Wednesday 2/18. Post comments to your group members' discussion question responses by 1pm on Thursday, 2/19.

 

 

 

Class 11) Tuesday, 2/24      

           

- Read: Holmes, Seth. Ch. 3 to 4, pp.45-110. Fresh Fruit Broken Bodies.

 

 

Class 12) Thursday, 2/26                

 

- Read: Holmes, Seth. Ch. 5 to 6, pp. 111-181. Fresh Fruit Broken Bodies.

- Assignment: Answer Discussion Question #6 by 6pm on Wednesday 2/25. Post comments to your group members' discussion question responses by 1pm on Thursday, 2/26.

 

Class 13) Tuesday, 3/3

- Read: Holmes, Seth. Ch. 7, pp. 182-198. Fresh Fruit Broken Bodies.

 

 

Class 14) Thursday, 3/5                   STRUCTURAL VULNERABILITY

- Read: Quesada, James et al. 2011. Structural Vulnerability and Health: Latino Migrant Laborers in the United States. Medical Anthropology 30(4). [My Courses]

- Assignment: Answer Discussion Question #7 by 6pm on Wednesday 3/4. Post comments to your group members' discussion question responses by 1pm on Thursday, 3/5.

 

___________________________________________________________________________________

 

 

Class 15) Tuesday, 3/10                   INFECTIOUS DISEASES

 

- Read:  (1) Singer and Erickson. 2013. pages 51-54 from Ch.3. Global Health.

(2) Inhorn and Brown. 1997. Chapter 2: The Anthropology of Infectious Disease. In The Anthropology of Infectious Disease. [My Courses]

           

                        Recommended:

Caduff, C. 2012. The Semiotics of Security: Infectious Disease Research and the Biopolitics of Informational Bodies in the United States. Cultural Anthropology 27(2): 333-357.

Ostrach and Singer. 2012. Syndemics of War: Malnutrition-Infectious Disease Interactions and the Unintended Health Consequences of Intentional War Policies. Annals of Anthropological Practice 36(2): 257-273.

                         

Class 16) Thursday, 3/12                                         Case Study: Ebola   

 

- Read: (1) Material Proximities and Hotspots: Toward and Anthropology of Viral Hemorrhagic Fevers. Medical Anthropology Quarterly 28(2): 280-303. [My Courses]

(2) Briggs, Charles. 2005. Communicability, Racial Discourse, and Disease. Annual Review of Anthropology 34: 269-91. [My Courses]

(3) Briggs and Hallin. 2007. Biocommunicability: The Neoliberal Subject and Its Contradictions in News Coverage of Health Issues. Social Text 25(4): 43-66. [My Courses]

- Assignment: Answer Discussion Question #8 by 6pm on Wednesday 3/11. Post comments to your group members' discussion question responses by 1pm on Thursday, 3/11.

 

___________________________________________________________________________________

 

SPRING BREAK

___________________________________________________________________________________

 

 

Class 17) Tuesday, 3/24                                           Case Study: Malaria

                                                                       

- Read:  Cueto, Marcos. 2013.  A Return to the Magic Bullet?: Malaria and Global Health in the Twenty-first Century. In When People Come First: Critical Studies in Global Health, J. Biehl and A. Petryna, eds.

 

 

 

Class 18) Thursday, 3/26                                         Case Study: HIV/AIDS

 

- Read:  Messac, L. and Krishna Prabhu. 2013. Redefining the Possible: The Global AIDS Response. In Reimagining Global Health: An Introduction. P. Farmer, J. Yon Kim, A. Kleinman, and M. Basilico, eds.  [My Courses]

-Assignment: Answer Discussion Question #9 by 6pm on Wednesday 3/25. Post comments to your group members discussion question responses by 1pm on Thursday, 3/26.

 

 

Class 19) Tuesday, 3/31                                          Case Study: HIV/AIDS

 

- Read: Fassin, Didier. 2013.  Children as Victims: The Moral Economy of Childhood in the Times of AIDS. In When People Come First: Critical Studies in Global Health, J. Biehl and A. Petryna, eds.

 

 

Class 20) Thursday, 4/2                                          Case Study: HIV/AIDS

 

- Read: Whyte, Susan et al. 2013. Therapeutic Citizenship: Belonging in Uganda’s Projectified Landscape of AIDS Care. In When People Come First: Critical Studies in Global Health, J. Biehl and A. Petryna, eds.

 

- Assignment: Answer Discussion Question #10 by 6pm on Wednesday 4/1. Post comments to your group members discussion question responses by 1pm on Thursday, 4/2.

 

___________________________________________________________________________________

 

 

Class 21) Tuesday, 4/7                     GLOBAL MENTAL HEALTH

 

- Read: Becker, Amy et al. 2013. The Unique Challenges of Mental Health and MDRTB: Critical Perspectives on Metrics of Disease. In Reimagining Global Health: An Introduction. P. Farmer, J. Yon Kim, A. Kleinman, and M. Basilico, eds.  [My Courses]

 

Class 22) Thursday, 4/9                              

 

- Read: Han, Clara. 2013. Labor Instability and Community Health: The Work of Pharmaceuticals in Santiago, Chile. In When People Come First: Critical Studies in Global Health, J. Biehl and A. Petryna, eds.

- Assignment: Answer Discussion Question #11 by 6pm on Wednesday 4/8. Post comments to your group members discussion question responses by 1pm on Thursday, 4/9.

 

___________________________________________________________________________________

 

 

Class 23) Tuesday, 4/14                   POLITICAL ECONOMY OF REPRODUCTIVE HEALTH

 

- Read:  Maternowska, M. Catherine. Ch. 1 and 2. In Reproducing Inequities: Poverty and the Politics of Population in Haiti. 2006.

 

Class 24) Thursday, 4/16                                         Gender & Survival

 

- Read: Maternowska, M. Catherine. Ch 3. In Reproducing Inequities: Poverty and the Politics of Population in Haiti. 2006.

-Assignment: Answer Discussion Question #12 by 6pm on Wednesday 4/15. Post comments to your group members discussion question responses by 1pm on Thursday, 4/16.

 

 

    Tuesday, 4/21                     NO CLASS: GREAT DAY

 

 

Class 25) Thursday, 4/23                                         Reproductive Healthcare

 

- Read: Maternowska, M. Catherine. Ch. 4 and 5. In Reproducing Inequities: Poverty and the Politics of Population in Haiti. 2006.

- Assignment: Answer Discussion Question #13 by 6pm on Wednesday 4/22. Post comments to your group members discussion question responses by 1pm on Thursday, 4/23.

 

Class 26) Tuesday, 4/28                                           Political Economy of International Aid

                       

- Read:  Maternowska, M. Catherine. Ch. 6 and 7. In Reproducing Inequities: Poverty and the Politics of Population in Haiti. 2006.

 

 

___________________________________________________________________________________

 

 

 

Class 27) Thursday, 4/30                 EMERGING ISSUES IN GLOBAL HEALTH

                                                                        Case Study: Tobacco and Alcohol Epidemics

Themes: Complex humanitarian emergencies, War and genocide, Biohazards since 9/11, Refugee crisis, Tobacco and alcohol epidemics.

 

- Read:  (1) Singer and Erickson, Ch 5. Global Health.

(2) Public Policy Statement: Alcohol, Drug, and Tobacco Study Group Takes A Stand. The WHO Framework Convention in Tobacco Control: An Urgent Call for U.S. Ratification. Medical Anthropology Quarterly 21(3): pp. 343–347. [My Courses]

Recommended:

Efroymson, D., S. Ahmed, J. Townsend, S. M. Alam, A. R. Dey, R. Saha, B. Dhar, A. I. Sujon, K. U. Ahmed, and O. Rahman. 2001. Hungry for Tobacco: An Analysis of the Economic Impact of Tobacco Consumption on the Poor in Bangladesh. Tobacco Control 10:212–217.

Ezzati, M., and A. D. Lopez. 2003 Estimates of Global Mortality Attributable to Smoking in 2000. Lancet 362:847–852.

Kaufman, N., and Mimi Nichter. 2001. The Marketing of Tobacco to Women: Global Perspectives. In Women and the Tobacco Epidemic: Challenges for the 21st Century. J.M. Samet and S. Y. Soon, eds. Pp. 69–99. Geneva: World Health Organization.

- Assignment: Answer Discussion Question #14 by 6pm on Wednesday 4/29. Post comments to your group members discussion question responses by 1pm on Thursday, 4/30.

 

___________________________________________________________________________________

 

 

Class 28) Tuesday, 5/5                     FUTURE OF ANTHROPOLOGY & GLOBAL HEALTH

Themes: Are we on the road to a healthier world? Careers for anthropologists in global health

 

- Read: Singer and Erickson, Ch 6. Global Health.

           

___________________________________________________________________________________

 

Group Research Presentations During the Final Exam Period, Monday 5/11 from 12-3pm

 

NOTE: This syllabus is subject to change. Reading, film and written assignments may be removed or added when the instructor believes it necessary for the course.