Chemistry Department Courses Offerings

CHEM 100 : Chemistry FirstYear Experience
This course serves as an introduction to the chemistry and biochemistry programs at Geneseo and is intended for those considering a chemistry or biochemistry major. Topics include career opportunities, the literature of the chemist and biochemist, research opportunities, software used in the chemistry curriculum, and strategies for success. Credits: 1(1-0)   Credits: 1

CHEM 104 : Chemistry & Society
A terminal one-semester course designed to acquaint non-science students with how chemistry and science affect their lives. Chemical principles are applied to problems of current interest, such as energy and pollution. Methods which chemists and other scientists use in their attempts to solve such problems are illustrated. Not available to science majors. Corequisite: CHEM 105. Offered every fall   Credits: 3

CHEM 105 : N/Chemistry & Society Lab
A terminal one-semeser laboratory designed to acquaint non-science students with how chemistry and science affect their lives. Experiments are applied to problems of current interest, such as acid rain. Methods which chemists and other scientists use in their attempts to solve such problems are introduced. Not available for credit to science majors. Corequisite: CHEM 104. Offered every fall   Credits: 1

CHEM 116 : Chemistry I
An introduction to some of the fundamental principles of chemistry. Topics include introduction to chemistry, stoichiometric principles, atomic structure and nature of the periodic table, chemical bonding, reactions in solutions, solution stoichiometry, thermochemistry, and trends in the physical and chemical properties of elements and their compounds. (Primarily designed for science majors and potential science majors.) CHEM 119 must accompany this course for natural science general education credit. Offered every fall   Credits: 3

CHEM 118 : Chemistry II
A continuation of CHEM 116. Topics to be covered include thermodynamics and reaction spontaneity, chemical kinetics, chemical equilibrium, properties of acids and bases, aqueous solution equilibria, electrochemistry, molecular structure and bonding theories, transition metals and their coordination compounds, and chemical properties of selected elements. Prerequisites: CHEM 116. Co-requisite: CHEM 119. Offered every spring   Credits: 3

CHEM 119 : N/Introductory Chemistry Lab
An introduction to the experimental techniques and methodology used to explore matter and chemical reactivity. Experiments include the synthesis and characterization of a compound, identification of unknown substances, an exploration of the gas laws, volumetric and gravimetric analysis, structure and bonding, and acid/base chemistry. Prerequisites: or Co-requisite: CHEM 116 or CHEM 203. Offered every fall and spring   Credits: 2

CHEM 188 : Experimental:
  Credits: 0-4

CHEM 199 : Directed Study:
  Credits: 1-3

CHEM 202 : Accelerated Chemistry
This course is designed for well-prepared science majors. Basic chemical principles are reviewed. Bonding theory, acid-base chemistry, chemical equilibria, thermodynamics, and electrochemistry are covered in depth. Additional advanced topics and applications are included. This course may be taken in place of CHEM 116 and CHEM 118 to meet prerequisite requirements for upper-level chemistry offerings. Prerequisites: Successful completion of a chemistry course beyond the NYS regents' course or permission of instructor.   Credits: 4

CHEM 203 : N/Principles of Chemistry I
An introduction to some of the fundamental principles of chemistry, including stoichiometry, atomic structure and bonding, periodicity, classification of reactions, thermochemistry, gases, intermolecular forces and changes of state, solutions, and kinetics. Designed for well-prepared science majors. Prerequisite: Successful completion of the NYS regients or similar course. Offered every fall.   Credits: 4

CHEM 204 : Principles of Chemistry II
A continuation of CHEM 203, Principles of Chemistry I. Topics to be covered include chemical equilibrium, properties of acids and bases, solution equilibria, free energy and thermodynamics, electrocheistry, transition metals and their coordination compounds, and chemical properties of selected elements. Prerequisites: CHEM 203. Offered first half, every spring   Credits: 2

CHEM 209 : Intermediate Chemistry Lab
This course serves as a bridge to advanced chemistry laboratory courses at Geneseo. Students will learn how to perform quantitative measurements and techniques for the synthesis and characterization of compounds. Safety in the laboratory environment an experimental design are emphasized. Prequisites: CHEM 119. Offered every spring semester   Credits: 2

CHEM 211 : Organic Chemistry I
An introduction to modern organic chemistry using a functional group approach. Topics include structure/reactivity relationships, reaction mechanisms, stereochemistry, and spectroscopy. Prerequisites: CHEM 118 or CHEM 204, CHEM 119. Offered every fall   Credits: 3

CHEM 212 : Organic Chemistry Laboratory
  Credits: 2

CHEM 213 : Organic Chemistry II
Continuation of CHEM 211 with emphasis on the biochemically important alcohol, amine, carbonyl and aromatic functional groups. Structure elucidation by spectroscopic methods is also explored. Prerequisites: CHEM 211. Credits: 3(3-0) Offered every spring   Credits: 3

CHEM 216 : Organic Chemistry Laboratory
Laboratory practices in representative organic preparations and procedures. Prerequisites: /Corequisite: CHEM 211 or CHEM 223. Offered every fall and spring   Credits: 2

CHEM 223 : Principles of Organic Chem I
An introduction to modern organic chemistry using a functional group approach. Topics to be covered include structure/reactivity relationship, reaction mechanisms, stereochemsistry and spectroscopy. Prerequisites: CHEM 204. Offeed second half semester, evey spring   Credits: 2

CHEM 224 : Principles of Organic Chem II
Continuation of CHEM 223 with emphasis on the biochemically important alcohol, amine, carbonyl and aromatic fuctional groups. Structure elucidation by spectroscopic methods is also explored. Prerequisites: CHEM 211 or CHEM 223. Offered every fall.   Credits: 4

CHEM 288 : Experimental:
  Credits: 0-9

CHEM 299 : Directed Study
  Credits: 1-6

CHEM 300 : Principles of Biochemistry
A one-semester survey of the chemistry of living organisms. Topics studied include enzymes and enzyme kinetics, proteins, nucleic acids and protein synthesis, oxidative phosphorylation, photosynthesis, metabolism of carbohydrates, lipids, and nitrogen-containing compounds. Prerequisites: CHEM 213 or CHEM 224 and CHEM 216. Offered every spring   Credits: 3

CHEM 301 : Biochemistry Laboratory
Students will be introduced to a selection of standard biochemical procedures such as DNA and protein purification, chromatographic separation, gel electrophoresis, dialysis, enzyme assay, and DNA analysis techniques. Prerequisites: CHEM 216 and CHEM 213 or CHEM 224. Co-requisites: CHEM 300 or CHEM 302.   Credits: 2

CHEM 302 : Biochemistry I
Introduction to the chemistry of living organisms. Structure-to-function relationships of proteins, nucleic acids, carbohydrates, and lipids are explored, with an emphasis on molecular interactions. Other topics include enzyme kinetics, catalytic mechanism, and modes of regulation, as well as, application of protein function such as oxygen transport, muscle contraction, the immune response, membrane transport, and biological signaling. Credit cannot be received for both this course and CHEM 300. Preference for enrollment given to Biochemistry and Chemistry majors. Prerequisites: CHEM 213 or CHEM 224. Offered every fall   Credits: 3

CHEM 304 : Biochemistry II
Continuation of the chemistry of living organisms. The chemistry of nucleic acids is explored in depth and these principles are applied to understanding the tools that biochemists use in the laboratory. Regulation of genes and the molecular interactions of protein-DNA complexes are also investigated. The last part of the course focuses on the chemistry of metabolism and biosynthesis, along with the mechanisms of regulation of these processes. Prerequisites: CHEM 302. Offered every spring   Credits: 3

CHEM 313 : Lab Tech in Organic Chem I
A laboratory course devoted to the synthesis, separation, and identification of organic compounds, utilizing modern instrumental methods. Prerequisites: CHEM 216 and CHEM 213 or CHEM 224. Offered every spring   Credits: 2

CHEM 315 : Bioorganic Chemistry
This course will survey several main classes of natural products (secondary metabolites), their biosynthesis, typical structures, biological properties, and structural elucidation. Special attention will be paid to mechanistic aspects of biosynthesis. The social and historical uses of natural products will also be considered. Prerequisites: 1 year of organic chemistry and 1 semester of biochemistry. Not offered on a regular basis.   Credits: 3

CHEM 318 : Advanced Organic Chemistry
Organic synthesis: Introduction to retrosynthetic analysis including a detailed study of methods of introducing stereo control. Mechanistic organic chemistry: conformational analysis, transition state theory, kinetics and reaction mechanism, computer modeling, and other topics of contemporary interest. Prerequisites: CHEM 213 or CHEM 224. Co-requisites: CHEM 324 or CHEM 320 or permission of the instructor. Not offered on a regular basis   Credits: 3

CHEM 320 : Physical Chemistry I
An introduction to the principles of chemical thermodynamics and the application of these principles to ideal and non-ideal chemical systems. Topics include the properties of gases and gas mixtures, thermochemistry, the laws of thermodynamics, entropy and free energy functions, chemical and phase equilibria, properties of solutions of nonelectrolytes and electrolytes, and electrochemistry. Computer software and/or programming will be used in this course. Prerequisites: CHEM 213, MATH 222, (PHYS 125 or PHYS 115) and (PHYS 126 or PHYS 116) or permission of the instructor. Offered every fall   Credits: 3

CHEM 322 : Physical Chemistry II
A continuation of CHEM 320. Covers two areas of modern physical chemistry: quantum chemistry and chemical kinetics. Topics in quantum chemistry include waves and particles, postulates of quantum mechanics, Schroedinger equation, applications with exact solutions, approximation methods, atomic structure, molecular structure, and spectroscopy. Topics in chemical kinetics include empirical laws, reaction mechanisms, and reaction rate theories. Prerequisites: CHEM 320. Offered every spring   Credits: 3

CHEM 324 : Principles of Physical Chem
An introduction to physical chemistry. Topics include the gas laws, the laws of thermodynamics, chemical and physical equilibria, properties of solutions, electrolytes, electrochemical cells, chemical kinetics, enzyme kinetics, and transport processes. Prerequisites: (CHEM 118 or CHEM 204), CHEM 209, PHYS 125, PHYS 116 and (MATH 222 or MATH 228). Offered every spring.   Credits: 3

CHEM 329 : Topics in Physical Chemistry
An in depth study of one or more selected topics in advanced physical chemistry with emphasis on modern concepts and recent developments. Topics for this course could include chemical thermodynamics, statistical thermodynamics, physical chemistry of solutions, atomic spectroscopy and structure, molecular spectroscopy and structure, chemical applications of group theory, quantum chemistry, kinetic molecular theory, chemical kinetics, advanced instrumental techniques. This course may be repeated for credit whenever new topics are offered. Prerequisites: CHEM 322 and/or permission of the instructor. Not offered on a regular basis.   Credits: 3

CHEM 330 : Inorganic Chemistry I
An introduction to modern inorganic chemistry. Topics include current models used to describe periodicity, bonding, and structure, acid-base chemistry, coordination chemistry, inorganic reaction mechanisms, and an introduction to organometallic chemistry. Prerequisite: /Co-requisite: CHEM 322 or CHEM 324 or permission of instructor. Offered every spring   Credits: 3

CHEM 331 : Lab Tech in Inorganic Chem
This course serves to familiarize students with modern synthetic and instrumental techniques used in the preparation, characterization, and study of inorganic compounds. Prerequisite: /Co-requisite: CHEM 330. Offered every spring.   Credits: 2

CHEM 334 : Bioinorganic Chemistry
This course examines the chemistry of inorganic elements in biological systems. Topics include the role of metals in proteins and enzymes, the use of metals in drug catalytic sites or as probes for biomolecular study, metals in migration and direction sensing, minerals in nutrition and toxicity, and the biochemical effects of radioactive elements. Prerequisites: CHEM 300 or CHEM 302 or BIOL 300. Not offered on a regular basis.   Credits: 3

CHEM 338 : Inorganic Chemistry II
Areas of current interest in the field of inorganic chemistry are explored. Topics covered include an introduction to chemical applications of group theory, organometallic compounds and catalysis, metal-metal bonding, clusters, inorganic photochemistry, and bioinorganic chemistry. Prerequisites: CHEM 330 and CHEM 322 or CHEM 324. Not offered on a regular bais.   Credits: 3

CHEM 340 : Modern Analytical Chemistry
A course to familiarize students with the theory of analytical chemistry. Particular emphasis is given to the use of instrumental methods for quantitative analysis. Topics include calibration methods, error analysis, electroanalytical chemistry, optical and mass spectroscopy, and separation methods. Prerequisites: CHEM 216 and CHEM 213 or CHEM 224. Offered every fall.   Credits: 3

CHEM 341 : Modern Analytical Methods
A lecture course intended to acquaint the student with the theoretical and applied aspects of modern methods of instrumental analysis, and separation. Prerequisites: CHEM 213 or CHEM 224, CHEM 216, and CHEM 322 or CHEM 324 or permission of the instructor. Not offered on a regular basis   Credits: 3

CHEM 342 : Modern Analytical Chem Lab
A course to familiarize students with the practice of modern analytical chemistry. Particular emphasis is given experiments using instrumental methods for quantitative analysis. Experiments will include calibration methods, error analysis, and applications of electroanalytical chemistry, optical and mass spectroscopy, and separation methods. Prerequisites/Corequisite: CHEM 340. Offered every fall.   Credits: 2

CHEM 351 : Current Topics in Chemistry
Participants prepare for and attend seminars presented by visiting speakers. Short written and oral reports on topics related to the speaker's area of expertise will be developed from the current literature. Methods for chemistry information retrieval and effective reading of the chemical literature will be covered. Students will receive information about career choices in the field. Offered: every fall Prerequisites: Senior status in Chemistry. Prerequisites: Senior status in Chemistry. Offered every fall   Credits: 1

CHEM 352 : Chemistry Senior Seminar
A seminar course designed to give students advanced scientific writing experience while preparing and formally presenting a scientific paper and demonstrating basic chemical knowledge. Prerequisites: CHEM 351 or senior status in Adolescence Certification (7-12) in Chemistry and General Science program. Offered every spring.   Credits: 1

CHEM 361 : Modern Chemistry Laboratory
An introduction to, and application of a variety of physico-, electro- and spectro-chemical techniques currently used for the determination of physical and molecular properties and for chemical analysis. Use of modern instrumentation, including computerized data analysis, will be stressed. Prerequisites/Corequisites: CHEM 322 or CHEM 324 or permission of instructor. Offered every spring   Credits: 2

CHEM 385 : Biochemistry Seminar
A seminar focusing on a topic or related group of topics in biochemistry. Papers from current literature will be discussed. Participants will explore the research literature and report their findings to the seminar group in the form of a paper and oral report. Prerequisites: CHEM 302 and CHEM 304 or permission of instructor.   Credits: 1

CHEM 388 : Experimental:
  Credits: 1-3

CHEM 389 : Experimental:
  Credits: 1-3

CHEM 393 : Honors Research
Research with a member of the Chemistry Department. A thesis that includes a statement of the research goals, pertinent background information, experimental procedures, analysis of data, and a discussion of the results is submitted at the completion of the project. After the thesis is accepted, the student gives an oral presentation. Enrollment is by invitation of the Department. The student must have completed a minimum of 22 hours in chemistry with a GPA of 3.3 and an overall GPA of 3.0. Students registered for CHEM 393 are not required to register for CHEM 352. Prerequisites: CHEM 322. Offered by individual arrangment.   Credits: 0-4

CHEM 395 : Internship:
  Credits: 1-6

CHEM 399 : Directed Study
Prerequisites: permission of department chair. (1 to 3 semester hours). Offered by individual arrangement.   Credits: 1-6

CHEM 499 : Directed Study
  Credits: 1-6

CHEM 501 : Introduction to Biochemistry
The chemistry of colloids, proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, enzymes, vitamins, and hormones, and an introduction to principal metabolic pathways. Offered: when demand is sufficient   Credits: 3

CHEM 511 : Theoretical Organic Chemistry
A detailed study of reaction mechanisms and modern theoretical concepts. Includes introduction to Huckel molecular orbital theory, Woodward-Hoffman Rules, photo-chemistry, linear free energy relationships, reactive intermediates, and other topics of contemporary interest. Offered: when demand is sufficient   Credits: 3

CHEM 521 : Advanced Physical Chemistry
A study of the basic principles underlying atomic and molecular structure and spectra, and an introduction to the quantum mechanical theory of the chemical bond. Offered: when demand is sufficient Prerequisites: CHEM 322. Recommended MATH 326.   Credits: 3

CHEM 531 : Inorganic Chemistry II
Chemistry of the elements and selected inorganic compounds from a modern point of view. Offered: when demand is sufficient   Credits: 3

CHEM 588 : Experimental:
  Credits: 0-4

CHEM 590 : Graduate Seminar
Presentation and discussion of topics from the current research literature. Offered: every fall   Credits: 1

CHEM 596 : Research in Chemistry
Individual studies in inorganic, analytical, organic, and physical chemistry which require both literature and laboratory research. Hours to be arranged. (2-6 hours to be arranged.) Offered: by individual arrangement   Credits: 2-6

CHEM 599 : Directed Study
  Credits: 1-4

CHEM 601 : Topics in Biochemistry
Advanced lectures and/or laboratory in biochemistry stressing recent developments and the current literature. May include lectures reviewing current concepts in the chemistry and metabolism of carbohydrates, proteins, nucleic acids, lipids, vitamins, or enzymes; or current concepts in physical biochemistry; or may include laboratory exercises designed to acquaint the student with techniques for isolation and characterization of metabolic products. Topics will be varied to meet the needs of students majoring in biology or biochemistry. The course may be repeated for credit whenever a new topic is offered. (2 to 4 hours to be arranged). Offered: demand is sufficient Prerequisites: Introductory courses in organic chemistry and in biochemistry. Physical chemistry desirable.   Credits: 2-4

CHEM 611 : Topics in Organic Chemistry
An intensive study of a special topic in organic chemistry with emphasis on developments from the current literature. Possible topics for the course may include physical organic chemistry, natural products, stereochemistry, heterocycles, modern synthetic methods. The course may be repeated for credit whenever a new topic is offered. (2 to 4 hours to be arranged). Offered: when demand is sufficient   Credits: 2-4

CHEM 621 : Topics in Physical Chemistry
An intensive study of a selected topic in advanced physical chemistry with emphasis on modern concepts and recent developments. Topics for this course could include chemical thermodynamics, statistical thermodynamics, physical chemistry of solutions, atomic spectroscopy and structure, molecular spectroscopy and structure, chemical applications of group theory, quantum chemistry, kinetic molecular theory, chemical kinetics, advanced instrumental techniques. This course may be repeated for credit whenever a new topic is offered. (2 to 4 hours to be arranged.) Offered: when demand is sufficient   Credits: 2-4

CHEM 631 : Topics in Inorganic Chemistry
An intensive study of an advanced topic in inorganic chemistry. Topics, to be offered according to the interests of staff and students, may include chemical bonding, coordination compounds, inorganic syntheses, x-ray crystallography, radiochemistry. The course may be repeated for credit whenever a new topic is offered. (2 to 4 hours to be arranged). Offered: when demand is sufficient   Credits: 2-4