KnightWeb Help Page

Welcome to the Dean's Office KnightWeb Help Page. Clicking on the Help Topics link below will open the Help Topics window. Once inside the window, you can click on a topic to troubleshoot registration or drop/add, or to learn more about registration procedures and policies.

In addition to linking you to KnightWeb Help Topics, this KnightWeb Help Page will also carry important announcements and updates concerning registration and drop/add.

The KnightWeb window you're currently working in has remained open so that you can switch back and forth between KnightWeb and KnightWeb Help. Once you've opened the Help Topics window, you can close the Help Page window. Before you do, however, take note of the many useful links on this page. When you have a chance, return to the Dean's Office website to explore a wealth of information related to curriculum, advisement, policies, and more.

 

Academic Load

The maximum number of credit hours that you may take each semester will depend upon your class standing and grade point average.
The table below will help you figure out both your recommended and your maximum load.
top

Auditing a Course

When you audit a course, you attend the course but neither enroll in nor receive credit for it.
To audit a course, you must obtain permission from the instructor and the chair of the department offering the course.
Audited courses do not appear on your transcript or receive any other formal documentation or recognition from the College.
top

Course Overloads

When a course reaches its maximum enrollment, it is closed, and you will not be able to add it on KnightWeb. A course instructor may grant you permission to take the instructor's course as an overloaded student. You may bring a signed statement of permission to the Records Office, where the overload permission will be processed.
Once the permission has been processed, you must still log on to KnighWeb and add the course. Only under unusual circumstances will the Dean's Office overload you into a course without the instructor's written permission. If a closed course is a "must have" for you because of degree requirements, you may file a petition to be overloaded in the Dean's Office, Erwin 106. However, please keep in mind that students are expected to plan their academic careers with an awareness of course availability. (To see how often a given course is typically offered, consult the Undergraduate Bulletin.) You are not likely to be overloaded into a course merely because you are due to graduate soon. In reaching a decision about an overload petition, the Dean's Office will consider whether the course would have been available to you earlier or might be available to you later than the semester in question.
top

Directed Study and Internships

You may arrange with a faculty member to undertake directed study of a topic not offered as a class, or to undertake a credit-bearing internship on or off campus. Forms for both are available in the Dean's Office (Erwin 106) and must be filled in, signed by the faculty member, and submitted to the Records Office before the end of the first week of the semester in which the project takes place.
top

Dropping and Adding Courses

During the first week of the semester, you may drop and add courses according to the published schedule. Once your scheduled drop/add time arrives, you may log in any time to drop and add courses until the drop/add period ends. Directed studies and Internships require permission and cannot be added on KnightWeb. The forms must be processed at the Records Office, Erwin 102.
top
Education Blocks

Courses in the School of Education's certification programs are arranged in blocks--that is, combinations of courses that a student must take concurrently as she or he moves through the program. For example, Block III of the certification program in Early Childhood Education consists of Curr 213, Curr 316, and Eced 352. A student enrolled in the Early Childhood program must take these courses together in a single semester. When signing up for an Education block, be sure to take note of additional hours that you may be required to keep free (e.g., TR 8 a.m. - 12 p.m). Also, be sure to note which sections of blocked courses have been grouped together, and to choose only sections that belong to the same group. Do not, for example, register for the section of the Curr 213 in one group and the section of Eced 352 in another group. KnightWeb will not display Education courses in their blocks and groups. You can find this information in the printed Master Schedule.
top

First-Week Attendance

At the beginning of the semester, you establish your intent to pursue a course for which you have registered by attending the first two scheduled class meetings of the course. If you do not attend class by the date specified in the Master Schedule under "Attendance Policies for Beginning of a Semester," the course instructor or the instructor's department may ask that the Records Office drop you from the course. If you know before the semester begins that you must miss the first two scheduled meetings of a course, you should so notify the instructor and the Dean of Students. If the absence is not owing to a religious holiday, the instructor will determine whether the absence is excusable.
top


GENERAL EDUCATION

The Dean's Office website can give you complete information about the General Education Curriculum, including answers to frequently asked questions.

Listed below are the courses that currently fulfill general education requirements at Geneseo.
HUMANITIES

Humn. 220 Western Humanities I
Humn. 221 Western Humanities II

NATURAL SCIENCE

Astr. 100-101 N/Introduction to Astronomy
Biol. 100 N/Contemporary Biology
Biol. 103-104 N/Human Biology
Biol. 117-118 N/General BiologyI
Chem. 103 N/Chemistry and Society
Chem. 116-117 N/Chemistry I
Chem. 120-121 N/General Chemistry I
Geog. 110 N/Physical Geography
GSci. 100 N/Our Geologic Environment
GSci. 101 N/Geological History of Life
GSci. 105 N/Environmental Science
GSci. 111 N/Geological Science I
Phys. 101 N/Science of Sound
Phys. 105 N/Nature of Light and Color
Phys. 111 N/General Physics I
Phys. 123-124 N/Analytical Physics I

SOCIAL SCIENCE


Anth. 100 S/Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
Anth. 101 S/Exploration of Human Diversity
Anth. 105 S/Introduction to Physical Anthropology
Anth. 110 S/Prehistoric Archeology
Anth. 120 S/Language and Culture
Anth. 207 S/Prehistoric Cultures of North America
Anth. 208 S/Classics of Ethnography
Anth. 215 S/Ancient Civilization in the Old World
Anth. 216 S/Ethnography and Film
Anth. 231 S/Sociolinguistics
Anth. 232 S/Chinese Ethnography
Anth. 235 S/Ancient Civilization in the Americas
Anth. 243 S/Women in Cross-Cultural Perspective
Comn. 103 S/Introduction to Interpersonal Communication
Comn. 160 S/Introduction to Mass Communication
Econ. 105 S/Government and Economy
Envr. 124 S/Environmental Issues
Geog. 102 S/Human Geography
Geog. 123 S/The Developing World
Hist. 102 S/Revolutions
Hist. 105 S/Western Civilization to 1600
Hist. 106 S/Europe Since 1600
Hist. 150 S/History of U.S. I
Hist. 151 S/History of U.S. II
Hist. 155 S/Politics and Power in the U.S.
Hist. 161 S/Issues in American History I
Hist. 162 S/Issues in American History II
Hist. 166 S/African-American History
Hist. 204 S/U.S. Since 1945
Hist. 250 S/Work and Workers in Modern America
Hist. 258 S/The American Presidency: A Survey
Hist. 260 S/Women in U.S. History
Hist. 263 S/Civil War and Reconstruction
Hist. 264 S/U.S. Immigration History
Hist. 266 S/Civil Rights Movement in America
Hist. 270 S/Latin America to 1825
Hist. 271 S/Latin America After 1825
Honr. 210 S/Honors Seminar in the Social Sciences
PlSc. 110 S/American Politics
PlSc. 120 S/Comparative Politics
PlSc. 140 S/International Politics
PlSc. 228 S/Politics in the Third World
PlSc. 246 S/U.S. Foreign Policy
Psyc. 215 S/Child Development
Psyc. 216 S/Adolescent Development
Psyc. 275 S/Environmental Psychology
Socl. 100 S/Introduction to Sociology
Socl. 102 S/Introduction to Social Problems and Public Policy
Socl. 105 S/Sociology of the Third World
Socl. 230 S/Race and Ethnicity
Socl. 240 S/Religion in American Society
Socl. 241 S/The Individual and Society

FINE ARTS
Studio courses in bold.

ArtH. 171 F/History of Western Art, Prehistoric through Gothic
ArtH. 172 F/History of Western Art, Renaissance through Contemporary
ArtH. 180 F/Non-Western Art: Africa, Oceania, the Americas, & Asia
ArtH. 278 F/Nineteenth-Century Art of the Western World
ArtH. 280 F/History of Art in U.S.
ArtH. 287 F/History of Modern Painting
ArtS. 100 F/Two-Dimensional Design
ArtS. 102 F/Introduction to the Visual Arts
ArtS. 205 F/Calligraphy
ArtS. 210 F/Drawing I
ArtS. 225 F/Watercolor
ArtS. 235 F/Photography I
Danc. 100 F/Introduction to Dance
Danc. 221 F/Dance History Through the 19th Century
Danc. 222 F/Dance History Since 1900
Engl. 285 F/Film Classics
Honr. 301 F/The Roots of 20th-Century Art
Musc. 100 F/Understanding Music
Musc. 104 F/Great Composers
Musc. 105 F/Popular Music in America
Musc. 106 F/Jazz
Musc. 107 F/Romantic Spirit in Music
Musc. 110 F/Basic Musicianship
Musc. 120 F/Introduction to Music History
Musc. 123 F/Music of the World's Peoples
Musc. 222 F/Stage Musicals
Musc. 226 F/Music in Western Civilization to 1750
Musc. 227 F/Music in Western Civilization Since 1750
Musc. 232 F/Folk Music in America
Thea. 100 F/Introduction to Theater
Thea. 130 F/Introduction to Technical Theater
Thea. 140 F/Play Analysis for the Theater
Thea. 200 F/The American Theater
Thea. 202 F/Theater History I
Thea. 203 F/Theater History II
Thea. 204 F/Asian Theater Survey
Thea. 234 F/Stage Costume History

CRITICAL WRITING AND READING

Intd. 105 Writing Seminar

NON-WESTERN TRADITIONS


Anth. 100 M/Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
Anth. 101 M/Exploration of Human Diversity
Anth. 202 M/Traditional Systems of Healing
Anth. 207 M/Prehistoric Cultures of North America
Anth. 208 M/Classics of Ethnography
Anth. 209 M/Iroquois Culture and Society
Anth. 211 M/Indians of North America
Anth. 214 M/Peoples of Southeast Asia
Anth. 215 M/Ancient Civilization in the Old World
Anth. 216 M/Native Voices: Africa and the Caribbean
Anth. 224 M/Women and Development in Latin America
Anth. 226 M/Native Voices: Mesoamerica and the Andes
Anth. 229 M/Ethnography and Film
Anth. 232 M/Chinese Ethnography
Anth. 235 M/Ancient Civilization in the Americas
Anth. 243 M/Women in Cross-Cultural Perspective
Anth. 260 M/Myths and Folktales of Native North America
Anth. 301 M/Religion, Culture, and Society
ArtH. 180 M/Non-Western Art: Africa, Oceania, the Americas, and Asia
ArtH. 281 M/Pre-Columbian and Latin American Art
ArtH. 284 M/Art of Asia
Danc. 211 M/Cultural Dance of Asian Peoples
Engl. 267 M/Non-Western Literature: (subtitle)
Engl. 360 M/Post-Colonial Literature
Fren. 326 M/The French-Speaking World Outside Europe
Geog. 123 M/The Developing World
Geog. 366 M/The Orient and Oceania
Hist. 103 M/Introduction to Non-Western History
Hist. 261 M/Native American History
Hist. 270 M/History of Latin America to 1825
Hist. 271 M/History of Latin America Since 1825
Hist. 281 M/Traditional East Asian History to 1840
Hist. 282 M/History of East Asia Since 1600
Hist. 291 M/The Islamic Middle East: 600-1800
Musc. 123 M/Music of the World's Peoples
Phil. 202 M/World Religions and Contemporary Issues
Phil. 214 M/Chinese Philosophy
Phil. 215 M/Eastern Philosophy
PlSc. 202 M/World Religions and Contemporary Issues
PlSc. 228 M/Politics in the Third World
PlSc. 240 M/Asia in the Global Setting
Psyc. 385 M/Cross-Cultural Psychology
Socl. 105 M/Introduction to Sociology of the Third World
Span. 326 M/Spanish-American Civilization
Thea. 204 M/Asian Theatre Survey

SUNY BOARD OF TRUSTEES REQUIREMENT IN U.S. HISTORY

Students who earned 85 or higher on the NYS U.S. History Regents Examination may choose from the following courses:

Hist. 150 U/U.S. History I
Hist. 151 U/U.S. History II
Hist. 155 U/Politics and Power in the U.S.
Hist. 161 U/Issues in American History I
Hist. 162 U/Issues in American History II
Hist. 166 U/African-American History
Hist. 204 U/U.S. Since 1945
Hist. 250 U/Work and Workers in Modern America
Hist. 251 U/Issues in the Social History of the U.S. 1800-1960
Hist. 258 U/The American Presidency: A Survey
Hist. 260 U/Issues in the History of American Women
Hist. 261 U/Native American History
Hist. 263 U/Civil War and Reconstruction: the U.S. 1848-1877
Hist. 264 U/U.S. Immigration History
Hist. 266 U/Civil Rights Movements in America
Intd. 203 U/Social Foundations of American Education
PlSc. 110 U/American Politics
PlSc. 211 U/Political Parties and Interest Groups
Socl. 217 U/Urban Sociology
Socl. 220 U/Inequality, Class, and Poverty
Socl. 230 U/Race and Ethnicity

Students who earned less than 85 on the NYS U.S. History Regents Examination may choose from the following courses:

Hist. 150 U/U.S. History I
Hist. 151 U/U.S. History II
Hist. 155 U/Politics and Power in the U.S.
Hist. 161 U/Issues in American History I
Hist. 162 U/Issues in American History II
Hist. 264 U/U.S. Immigration History
Intd. 203 U/Social Foundations of American Education

NUMERIC & SYMBOLIC REASONING REQUIREMENT
Students who earned 85 or higher on the Course III NYS Regents Exam in Mathematics or 550 or above on the Math SAT (=ACT 23) may choose from the following courses:

CSci 114 R/Survey of Computer Science
CSci 119 R/Object Oriented Programming
CSci 120 R/Procedural Programming
CSci 141 R/Introduction to Computer Science
Geog 378 R/Quantitative Research Methods
Math 104 R/Mathematical Ideas
Math 113 R/Finite Math for Social Sciences
Math 141 R/Mathematical Concepts for Elementary Education II
Math 160 R/Elements of Chance
Math 213 R/Applied Calculus I
Math 221 R/Calculus I
Math 242 R/Elements of Probability and Statistics
Phil 111 R/Introduction to Logic
PlSc 251 R/Modern Political Analysis
Psyc 250 R/Introduction to Behavioral Statistics
Socl 211 R/Statistics for Social Research

Students who earned less than 85 on the Course III NYS Regents Exam in Mathematics and less than 550 on the Math SAT (=ACT 23) may choose from the following courses:

Geog 378 R/Quantitative Research Methods
Math 113 R/Finite Math for Social Sciences
Math 141 R/ Mathematical Concepts for Elementary Education II
Math 160 R/Elements of Chance
Math 213 R/Applied Calculus I
Math 221 R/Calculus I
Math 242 R/Elements of Probability and Statistics
PlSc 251 R/Modern Political Analysis
Psyc 250 R/Introduction to Behavioral Statistics
Socl 211 R/Statistics for Social Research
top

Graduate Courses for Undergraduates

An advanced undergraduate student in the School of Education or the Department of Communicative Disorders and Sciences may apply to do up to six hours of 400-level graduate coursework related to the student's degree program. Application should be made to the Director of the School of Education or the Department Chair in Communicative Disorders and Sciences. A decision will be made based on (1) the student's academic progress, grade point average, and rationale for enrolling in graduate courses, and (2) the availability of space in the course. If the student is within 12 credit hours of graduation when enrolling in graduate courses, and if the student graduates within one calendar year of completing the courses, the graduate coursework will appear on a graduate transcript; otherwise, it will appear on the student's undergraduate transcript.
top
Lectures and Labs for N/ Courses

Every N/ course has a laboratory component. However, in some courses the lecture and the laboratory components carry different course numbers. For example, students in Human Biology sign up for both Biol 103, Human Biology-Lecture, and Biol 104, Human Biology-Laboratory. In other courses, such as Our Geologic Environment, both laboratory and lecture components carry the same number--in this case, GSci 100. When the lecture and laboratory components bear different numbers, you'll find the N/ prefix attached only to the laboratory component. Thus, on KnightWeb, you'll see Biol 103, Human Biology for the lecture, but Biol 104, N/Human Biology for the lab. When the lecture and the laboratory components bear the same number, you'll find the N/ prefixed attached to both the lecture and the lab: thus, GSci 100, N/Our Geologic Environment for both lecture and lab.

The important facts to remember are these:
  • When searching for N/ courses, remember that not every course that counts for Natural Science core credit will appear on your screen with an N/ in front of it. In some cases, such as Biol 103-104, the N/ appears only in front of the lab.
  • Whenever you take a course for Natural Science core credit, be sure to sign up for both the lecture and the laboratory components of the course.
top

Lectures and Studios in Music

If a lecture course in Music has an associated studio component, you must enroll in both lecture and studio sections. Examples include Musc 213, Musc 366, and Musc 388.
top

Music Lessons and Ensembles

The Music Faculty handle all registration for music lessons and ensembles. You must audition for a place in a music ensemble. If you are interested in auditioning for an ensemble, you should keep the scheduled rehearsal hours for that ensemble free from conflicts with other classes, work-study hours, and other commitments.
top

Pass/Fail Option

In any given semester, you may elect the pass/fail option for one course of five or fewer credit hours. Over the course of your undergraduate career, you may elect the pass/fail option for up to four courses. You may only elect this option if you are a sophomore, junior, or senior with a cumulative grade point average of 2.0 or higher.

You may not elect the pass/fail option for any of the following:
  • a course required for your major or minor,
  • a course in your major or minor department,
  • a course used to meet general education or concentration requirements.

You may choose the pass/fail option from the first day of the semester until the deadline listed in the Master Schedule. To elect pass/fail, you must submit the appropriate form to the Director of Records, Erwin 102. You must complete all required work in a course that you take pass/fail.
top

Summer Sessions Registration


You can register for Summer courses on KnightWeb at the same time that you register for Fall. KnightWeb usually remains open for Summer registration through the last week before Summer Session 1 begins. For exact dates and complete information on Summer Sessions, visit the Summer Sessions website.
top