Greek Task Force Report Appendix

 

Appendix A

Greek Articles

Appendix B

Alumni Giving

Appendix C

Greek Grades

Table 1. Grades of Greek Chapters and Comparison Groups for the Last 3 Semesters

Table 2. Comparison of Grades for all Students Who Pledged in the Spring '96 Semester

Table 3. Comparison of Grades for Freshmen Students Who Pledged in the Spring '96 Semester

Table 4. Comparison of Grades for Upperclass Students Who Pledged in the Spring '96 Semester

Table 5. Comparison of Grades for All Students Who Pledged in the Fall '96 Semester

Table 6. Comparison of Grades for All Upperclass Students Who Pledged in the Fall '96 Semester

Appendix D

Examples of Community Service and Order of Omega

Appendix E

Alternatives to Hazing

Appendix F

Advisors

The Officer-Advisor Relationship

The Role of the Chapter Advisor

The Role of the Faculty/Staff Advisor

Appendix G

Coordinator of Greek Affairs - Example Job Description

 

Appendix A

Greek Articles

References


Ackerman, J. (1990). The survival of Greek Life: Concerns and solutions. NASPA Journal, 28, 78-81.

American Council on Education. (1990). Greek organizations on the college campus: Guidelines for institutional action. Office of Self-Regulation Initiatives.

Anderson, J. W. (1987). Roles and responsibilities of greek advisors. In Winston Jr., R. B., Nettles III, W. R., and Opper Jr., J. H. (Eds.). Fraternities and sororities on the contemporary college campus. (New Directions for Student Services, 40, 75-86). San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Anson, J. L., & Marchensani, R. F. (editors). (1991). Baird's Manual of American College Fraternities. Baird's Manual Foundation, Inc.: Indianapolis, Indiana.

Baier, J. L., & Whipple, E.G. (1990). Greek values and attitudes: A comparison with independents. NASPA Journal, 28, 43-53.

Bernstein, N. (May 5, 1996). Behind some fraternity walls, Brothers in crime. NY Times, A1.

Bryan, W. A. (1987). Contemporary fraternity and sorority issues. In Winston Jr., R. B., Nettles III, W. R., and Opper Jr., J. H. (Eds.). Fraternities and sororities on the contemporary college campus. (New Directions for Student Services, 40, 37-56). San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Colgan, S., & Opper Jr., J. H. (1987). Using organization development techniques to enhance chapter functioning. In Winston Jr., R. B., Nettles III, W. R., and Opper Jr., J. H. (Eds.). Fraternities and sororities on the contemporary college campus. (New Directions for Student Services, 40, 87-104). San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Cufaude, J. (1990). Strategies from a greek advisor: Maximizing the greek cocurriculum's potential. NASPA Journal, 28, 82-90

East Stroudsburg University. Overview and Charge: The Greek Life Committee.

Eddy, W. (1990). Greek and non-greek affiliation: Relationship to levels of autonomy. NASPA Journal, 28, 54-59.

Ferguson, J. (1996). Pledging: female bonding or sorority abuse? Lamron, SUNY-Geneseo, 75(15), 8.

Fraternity Executives Association, Inc. FEA Position on Alcohol.

Fraternity Executives Association, Inc. FEA Position on Campus Conferences and Workshops.

Fraternity Executives Association, Inc. FEA Position on Campus Recognition.

Fraternity Executives Association, Inc. FEA Position on Dry Rush.

Fraternity Executives Association, Inc. FEA Position on Expansion Presentations.

Fraternity Executives Association, Inc. FEA Position on the Fundamentals of Rushing.

Fraternity Executives Association, Inc. FEA Position on Hazing and Pre-Initiation Activities.

Goodwin, L. (1989). Explaining alcohol consumptionand related experiences among fraternity and sorority members. Journal of College Student Development, 30, 448-458.

Gulland, E. D., & Powell, M. E. (1989). Colleges, Fraternities, and Sororities: A White Paper on Tort Liability Issues. American Council on Education.

Harvey, J. C. (9189). Fraternities and the constitution: University-imposed relationship statements may violate student associational rights. The Journal of College and University Law, 17 (1), 11-42.

Heida, D. (1990). Greek affirs in higher education: Dilemmas in philosophy and practice. NASPA Journal, 28, 3-7

Hughes, M., & Winston, R. (1987). Effects of fraternity membership on interpersonal values. Journal of College Student Personnel, 28, 405-411.

Kilgannon, S., & Erwin, T. (1992). A longitudinal study about the identity and moral development of greek students. Journal of College Student Development, 33, 253-259.

Kuh, G. D., & Arnold, J. C. (1993). Liquid bonding: A cultural analysis of the role of alcohol in fraternity pledgeship. Journal of College Student Development, 34, 327-334.

Kuh, G. D., & Lyons, J. W. (1990). Fraternities and sororities: Lessons from the College Experience Study. NASPA Journal, 28, 20-29.

Kuh, G.,D., Pascarella, E. T., & Wechsler, H. (1996). The questionable value of fratenities. The Chronicle of Higher Education.

Maddison, J., & Sullivan, M. (Feb. 24, 1996). Greek risk management: How fast are you driving. Residence Life Conference, SUNY-Cortland.

Maisel, J. (1990). Social fraternities and sororities are not conducive to the educational process. NASPA Journal, 28, 8-12.

Malaney, G. D. (1990). Student attitudes toward fraternities and soroities. NASPA Journal, 28, 37-42.

Marlowe, A., & Auvenshine, C. (1982). Greek membership: It's impact on the moral development of college freshmen. Journal of College Student Personnel, 23, 53-57.

McCabe, D. L., & Bowers, W. J. (1996). The relation between student cheating and college fraternity or sorority membership. NASPA Journal, 33, 280-291.

McKee, C. W. (1987). Understanding the diversity of the greek world. In Winston Jr., R. B., Nettles III, W. R., and Opper Jr., J. H. (Eds.). Fraternities and sororities on the contemporary college campus. (New Directions for Student Services, 40, 21-36). San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

McKenzie, A. (1990). Community service and social action: Using the past to guide the future of black greek -letter fraternities. NASPA Journal, 28, 30-36.

Milani, T. E., & Nettles III, W. R. (1987). Defining the relationship between fraternities and soroities and the host institution. In Winston Jr., R. B., Nettles III, W. R., and Opper Jr., J. H. (Eds.). Fraternities and sororities on the contemporary college campus. (New Directions for Student Services, 40, 57-74). San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Neuberger, C. G., & Hanson, G. S. (1997). The Greek Life Self-Study: A Powerful Process for Change on Campus, NASPA Journal, 34, 91-100.

Ohio University. TOWARD 2000: The future of greek life at Ohio University. Greek Strategic Plan: The Final Draft.

Pascarella, E., Edison, M., Whitt, E. J., Nora, A., Hagedorn, L. S., & Terenzini, P. (1996). Cognitive effects of greek affiliation during the first year of college. NASPA Journal, 33, 242-259.

Pavela, G. (Ed.). (Summer, 1995). Synthesis: Law and Policy in Higher Education. Fraternities: Part I, 7, 489-508.

Pavela, G. (Ed.). (Fall, 1995). Synthesis: Law and Policy in Higher Education. Fraternities: Part II, 7, 509-528.

Pike, G, & Askew, J. (1990). The impact of fraternity or sorority membership on academic involvement and learning outcomes. NASPA Journal, 28, 13-19.

Robson, J. (ed.). (1968). Baird's manual of American college fraternities. 18th edition. The Collegiate Press.

San Diego State University. Definition of Hazing.

Shaw, D. L., & Morgan, T. E. (1990). Greek advisors' perceptions of sorority hazing. NASPA Journal, 28, 60-64.

Southeast Missouri State University. (1995) Hazing education audit: 3-15-95 Review of Progress.

State University of New York at Geneseo. Allied Greek Community Mission.

State University of New York at Geneseo. A quest for excellence: Geneseo's plan for a decade 1990-2000. Mission and Goals.

State University of New York at Geneseo. InterGreek Council Constitution.

State University of New York at Geneseo. (Spring, 1996). InterGreek Council Greek Rush.

State University of New York at Geneseo. (Spring, 1996). InterSorority Council Greek Rush.

State University of New York at Geneseo. (April, 1989). Greek Affairs at Geneseo: Final Report of the Task Force and Agreement Between Inter Greek Council and SUNY Geneseo.

State University of New York at Geneseo. Mission/purpose statements of numerous Geneseo fraternities and sororities.

State University of New York at Plattsburgh. Greek standards manual.

State University of New York at Plattsburgh. Rush handbook and guide to greek life.

State University of New York at Potsdam. Recommendations for greek life at SUNY Potsdam.

State University of New York at Potsdam. (1992). The relationship between SUNY Potsdam and sororities and fraternities.

Strange, C. (1986). Greek affiliation and goals of the academy: A commentary. Journal of College Student Personnel, 27, 519-523.

Stump, R. J., & Sullivan, M. A. (1990). Clarifying the university-student relationship: Contracted independent organizations. NASPA Journal, 28, 91-96

Tampke, D. (1990). Alcohol behavior, risk perception, and fraternity and sorority membership. NASPA Journal, 28, 71-77

University of Arkansas. (1994). Minimum standards of operstion for greek organizations.

University of Maryland at College Park. (1995). Greek leadership resource manual.

University of Maryland at College Park. (1995). Greek life: A foundation for the future.

University of Maryland at College Park. (1995). Greek Scholarship Manual.

University of Maryland at College Park. (1995). Standards Implementation Manual.

University of Pennsylvania. (1996). Twenty-first century report on an Ivy league greek system. Almanac Supplement.

Walton, S. (1996). Social Host Responsibility: Risks for fraternities and Student Hosts. NASPA Journal, 34, 29-35.

Wechsler, H., Kuh, G., Davenport, A. E. (1996). Fraternities, sororities, and binge drinking, NASPA Journal, 33, 260-279.

Weschler et. al., (1995). Binge drinking on American college campuses: A new look at an old problem. Harvard School of Public Health, College Alcohol Study, Depatment of Health and Social Behavior.

Wilder, D. H., Hoyt, A. E., Surbeck, B. S., Wilder, J. C., & Carney, P. I. (1986). Greek affiliation and attitude change in college students. Journal of College Student Personnel, 27, 510-519.

Williams, L. B. (1996). Campus Commons - Waging Peace on Frarternities. About Campus, 1(5), 24-26.

Winston Jr., R. B., & Hughes, M. J. (1987). Resources and emerging issues. In Winston Jr., R. B., Nettles III, W. R., and Opper Jr., J. H. (Eds.). Fraternities and sororities on the contemporary college campus. (New Directions for Student Services, 40, 105-118). San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Winston Jr., R. B., & Saunders, S. (1987). The greek experience: Friend or foe of student development. In R. Winston, W. Nettles, & J. Opper. (Eds.), Fraternities and sororities on the contemporary college campus (New Directions for Student Services, No. 40, pp. 5-20).

 

Appendix B


Alumni Giving


Comparison of Alumni Giving Participation Rates for Greek-Affiliated Alumni and Other Alumni

Table 1. By Class Era

  Greek OtherDifferenceAll
Era Affiliated Alumni(Greek - Other)Alumni
      
Pre-60s# constituents1,1421,499 2,641
 # donors445436 881
 participation rate39%29%10%33%
 total gifts$46,576$30,726 $77,302
 average$105$70$34$88
      
60s/70s# constituents2,2229,609 11,831
 # donors7512,270 3,021
 participation rate34%24%10%26%
 total gifts$53,592$122,379 $175,971
 average$71$54$17$58
      
80s/90s# constituents1,65915,141 16,800
 # donors4173,356 3,773
 participation rate25%22%3%22%
 total gifts$17,640$151,974 $169,614
 average$42$45-$3$45
      
All classes# constituents5,02326,249 31,272
 # donors1,6136,062 7,675
 participation rate32%23%9%25%
 total gifts$117, 808$305, 079 $422, 888
 average$73$50$23$55

Total gifts includes gifts from living donors received in FY 1996
Greek affiliation based on alumni data base information
Includes active alumni with undergraduate degree from SUNY Geneseo prior to 1996

Submitted by R. Rosati.


Appendix C: Greek Grades*

* In order to try to maintain the privacy of individual grades, organization names have been removed and replaced with an individual letter.

Grades of Greek Chapters and Comparison Groups for the Last 3 Semesters.

 

 Fall, 1995Spring, 1996Fall, 1996
A2.79 (36)3.13 (33)3.11 (34)
B2.81 (11)2.77 (25)2.89 (26)
C2.83 (19)2.84 (18)2.73 (13)
D2.84 (40)3.04 (50)3.01 (41)
E2.89 (53)3.17 (49)3.21 (53)
F2.90 (36)3.12 (46)3.11 (35)
G2.91 (37) 2.96 (30)
H2.94 (17)3.07 (23)3.10 (27)
I2.98 (41)3.14 (35)3.20 (46)
J3.07 (46)3.12 (74)3.32 (47)
IGC Sorority GPA2.91 (336)
(weighted)
2.90
(unweighted)
3.08 (353)
(weighted)
3.04
(unweighted)
3.11 (352)
(weighted)
3.06
(unweighted)
All College Female GPA2.952.972.95
    
A  2.71 (30)
B2.45 (11) 2.33 (13)
C2.70 (23) 2.78 (20)
D2.72 (26)2.77 (28)2.95 (32)
E2.74 (28)2.78 (32)3.03 (27)
F2.75 (34)2.89 (36)2.89 (23)
G2.89 (26)2.97 (29)2.90 (21)
H2.90 (42)3.01 (41)2.98 (25)
      
IGC Fraternity GPA2.77 (190)
(weighted)
2.74
(unweighted)
2.89 (166)
(weighted)
2.88
(unweighted)
2.86 (191)
(weighted)
2.82
(unweighted)
All College Male GPA2.832.842.83

Numbers in parentheses represent the number of members in the organization.
Weighted GPA includes the number of members in each organization.
Unweighted GPA treats all organizations as the same size.

 

 Fall, 1995Spring, 1996Fall, 1996
A1.69 (4)2.20 (3)2.26 (4)
B2.4 (3)2.48 (5)1.66 (5)
C2.79 (5)2.18 (5)2.52 (5)
    
AGC Sorority GPA2.33
(weighted)
2.29
(unweighted)
2.30
(weighted)
2.29
(unweighted)
2.14
(weighted)
2.15
(unweighted)
All College Minority Female GPA2.682.532.66

 


Table 2. Comparison of Grades for all Students Who Pledged in the Spring '96 Semester

 

SororitiesFall, 1995Spring, 1996Fall, 1996Spring'96-Fall'95
A    
B    
C    
D2.85 (22)
.5566
2.47 (22)
.5260
3.07 (22)
.3337
-0.38
E2.88 (10)
.5180
2.65 (10)
.6545
2.72 (10)
.9438
-0.23
F2.93 (10)
.3884
2.59 (10)
.3893
2.94 (10)
.4426
-0.34
G2.96 (3)
.4819
2.88 (3)
.2967
2.77 (3)
.7371
-0.09
H3.02 (12)
.6463
2.74 (12)
.7172
3.12 (12)
.6110
-0.28
I3.02 (6)
.7244
3.16 (6)
.5252
3.11 (5)
.5482
+0.14
J3.10 (12)
.5276
2.74 (12)
.7495
2.95 (12)
.6520
-0.05
   
Sorority GPA2.95 (75)2.67 (75)2.99 (74)-0.28
Pooled Variance.30916814.35914916.34611566 
Fraternities    
A    
B    
C2.34 (5)
.7317
2.5 (5)
.6423
2.52 (4)
.6352
+0.16
D2.53 (5)
.5103
2.57 (5)
.4767
2.50 (5)
.8135
+0.04
E2.69 (8)
.6284
2.44 (8)
.9670
2.85 (8)
.4124
-0.25
F2.72 (12)
.6991
2.22 (12)
.7297
2.75 (12)
.5355
-0.50
G2.86 (7)
.6285
2.41 (7)
.6468
2.84 (7)
.8745
-0.45
H3.00 (7)
.6124
2.73 (7)
.4581
2.74 (7)
.3655
-0.27
   
Fraternity GPA2.72 (44)2.44 (44)2.73 (43)-0.28
Pooled Variance.41957355.49292394.36831493 

Cells: Mean (Number of Pledges)
Standard Deviation

 Spring, 1995Fall, 1995Spring, 1996Fall, 1996
Female - Freshmen2.40 (129)2.68 (635)2.46 (122)2.81 (761)
Female - Sophomores2.90 (675)2.89 (699)2.87 (681)2.92 (722)
Male - Freshmen2.43 (94)2.60 (329)2.27 (96)2.74 (375)
Male - Sophomores2.85 (400)2.79 (406)2.76 (358)2.81 (393)
     
 Spring, 1995Fall, 1995Spring, 1996Fall, 1996
Female-Fresh. & Soph.2.83 (804) 2.81 (803) 
Male-Fresh. & Soph.2.77 (494) 2.66 (454) 

Cells: Mean (Number of Students)


 

Table 3. Comparison of Grades for Freshmen Students Who Pledged in the Spring '96 Semester

 

SororitiesFall, 1995Spring, 1996Fall, 1996Spring'96-Fall'95
A    
B    
C----
D----
E2.69 (5)
.4093
2.54 (5)
.3229
3.11 (5)
.2430
-0.15
F2.75 (7)
.4838
2.65 (7)
.7792
2.62 (7)
1.1188
-0.10
G2.78 (10)
.5238
2.47 (10)
.3310
3.02 (10)
.3512
-0.31
H2.79 (6)
.4721
2.34 (6)
.7489
2.68 (6)
.7470
-0.45
I2.93 (10)
.3884
2.59 (10)
.3893
2.94 (10)
.4426
-0.34
Jxxxx
   
Sorority GPA2.80 (38)2.52 (38)2.88 (38)-0.28
Pooled Variance.21260187.27922027.40635295 
Fraternities    
A    
B    
C2.14 (4)
.6171
2.31 (4)
.6508
2.34 (3)
.6409
+0.17
D2.39 (4)
.4693
2.56 (4)
.5504
2.37 (4)
.8702
+0.17
E2.62 (6)
.6101
2.28 (6)
1.0770
2.81 (6)
.3442
-0.34
F2.72 (12)
.6991
2.22 (12)
.7297
2.75 (12)
.5355
-0.50
G2.77 (6)
.6423
2.26 (6)
.5633
2.71 (6)
.8883
-0.51
H2.94 (6)
.6402
2.75 (6)
.4993
2.76 (6)
.3978
-0.19
   
Fraternity GPA2.65 (38)2.36 (38)2.68 (37)-0.29
Pooled Variance.41101407.52091273.37343837 

Cells: Mean (Number of Pledges)
Standard Deviation

 Spring, 1995Fall, 1995Spring, 1996Fall, 1996
Female - Freshmen2.40 (129)2.68 (635)2.46 (122)2.81 (761)
Female - Sophomores2.90 (675)2.89 (699)2.87 (681)2.92 (722)
Male - Freshmen2.43 (94)2.60 (329)2.27 (96)2.74 (375)
Male - Sophomores2.85 (400)2.79 (406)2.76 (358)2.81 (393)
     
 Spring, 1995Fall, 1995Spring, 1996Fall, 1996
Female-Fresh. & Soph.2.83 (804) 2.81 (803) 
Male-Fresh. & Soph.2.77 (494) 2.66 (454) 

Cells: Mean (Number of Students)


 

Table 4. Comparison of Grades for Upperclass Students Who Pledged in the Spring '96 Semester

SororitiesFall, 1995Spring, 1996Fall, 1996Spring'96-Fall'95
A    
B    
C    
D----
E2.90 (12)
.5993
2.48 (12)
.6622
3.13 (10)
.3243
-0.42
F2.96 (3)
.4819
2.88 (3)
.2967
2.77 (3)
.7371
-0.09
G3.02 (6)
.7244
3.16 (6)
.5252
3.11 (5)
.5482
+0.14
H3.17 (3)
.5622
2.65 (3)
.3259
2.96 (3)
.3600
-0.52
I3.25 (7)
.7094
2.88 (7)
.9041
3.13 (7)
.8030
-0.37
J3.42 (6)
.3874
3.13 (6)
.5424
3.29 (5)
.3303
-0.29
   
Sorority GPA3.10 (37)2.82 (37)3.10 (33)-0.28
Pooled Variance.36906513.41827824.28887802 
Fraternities    
A    
B    
C----
D2.91 (2)
.8839
2.93 (2)
.3253
2.99 (2)
.7425
+0.02
E3.08 (1)2.57 (1)3.05 (1)-0.51
F3.26 (1)3.25 (1)3.06 (1)-0.01
G3.34 (1)2.63 (1)2.65 (1)-0.71
H3.37 (1)3.30 (1)3.58 (1)-0.07
   
Fraternity GPA3.15 (6)2.94 (6)3.05 (6)-0.21

Cells: Mean (Number of Pledges)
Standard Deviation

 Spring, 1995Fall, 1995Spring, 1996Fall, 1996
Female - Freshmen2.40 (129)2.68 (635)2.46 (122)2.81 (761)
Female - Sophomores2.90 (675)2.89 (699)2.87 (681)2.92 (722)
Male - Freshmen2.43 (94)2.60 (329)2.27 (96)2.74 (375)
Male - Sophomores2.85 (400)2.79 (406)2.76 (358)2.81 (393)
     
 Spring, 1995Fall, 1995Spring, 1996Fall, 1996
Female-Fresh. & Soph.2.83 (804) 2.81 (803) 
Male-Fresh. & Soph.2.77 (494) 2.66 (454) 

Cells: Mean (Number of Students)


 

Table 5. Comparison of Grades for All Students Who Pledged in the Fall '96 Semester

SororitiesFall, 1995Spring, 1996Fall, 1996Spring'96-Fall'95
A    
B    
C----
D----
E2.67 (9)
.6001
2.69 (9)
.4108
2.87 (9)
.4814
+0.18
F2.73 (7)
.8513
3.23 (6)
.6809
2.80 (7)
.5621
-0.43
G2.84 (7)
.2999
3.05 (7)
.4863
2.67 (8)
.5181
-0.38
H2.86 (1)3.12 (1)2.72 (1)-0.40
I2.98 (2)
.8132
2.87 (2)
1.3647
2.98 (2)
.5586
+0.11
J3.06 (8)
.3998
2.77 (8)
1.0746
2.67 (11)
.6025
-0.10
   
Sorority GPA2.83 (34)2.92 (33)2.76 (38)-0.16
Fraternities    
A    
B--- 
C2.52 (3)
1.1029
2.78 (3)
.7277
2.74 (3)
.9603
-0.04
D2.59 (6)
.2786
2.64 (6)
1.1096
2.64 (8)
.6227
0
E2.69 (2)
.4596
3.0 (2)
.4243
2.32 (7)
.6888
-0.68
F2.90 (3)
.5030
2.88 (3)
.4417
3.21 (3)
.4765
+0.33
G3.01 (3)
.5829
2.78 (3)
.2469
3.14 (3)
.1858
+0.36
H3.89 (1)3.80 (1)2.6 (1)-1.20
   
Fraternity GPA2.78 (18)2.83 (18)2.69 (25)-0.14

Cells: Mean (Number of Pledges)
Standard Deviation

 Spring, 1995Fall, 1995Spring, 1996Fall, 1996
Female - Freshmen2.40 (129)2.68 (635)2.46 (122)2.81 (761)
Female - Sophomores2.90 (675)2.89 (699)2.87 (681)2.92 (722)
Male - Freshmen2.43 (94)2.60 (329)2.27 (96)2.74 (375)
Male - Sophomores2.85 (400)2.79 (406)2.76 (358)2.81 (393)
     
 Spring, 1995Fall, 1995Spring, 1996Fall, 1996
Female-Fresh. & Soph.2.83 (804) 2.81 (803) 
Male-Fresh. & Soph.2.77 (494) 2.66 (454) 

Cells: Mean (Number of Students)


 

Table 6. Comparison of Grades for All Upperclass Students Who Pledged in the Fall '96 Semester

SororitiesFall, 1995Spring, 1996Fall, 1996Spring'96-Fall'95
A    
B    
C    
D----
E2.67 (9)
.6001
2.69 (9)
.4108
2.87 (9)
.4814
+0.18
F2.73 (7)
.8513
3.23 (6)
.6809
2.80 (7)
.5621
-0.43
G2.84 (7)
.2999
3.05 (7)
.4863
2.67 (8)
.5181
-0.38
H2.86 (1)3.12 (1)2.72 (1)-0.40
I2.98 (2)
.8132
2.87 (2)
1.3647
2.98 (2)
.5586
+0.11
J3.06 (8)
.3998
2.77 (8)
1.0746
2.67 (11)
.6025
-0.10
   
Sorority GPA2.83 (34)2.92 (33)2.76 (38)-0.16
Fraternities    
A    
B----
C2.52 (3)
1.1029
2.78 (3)
.7277
2.74 (3)
.9603
-0.04
D2.59 (6)
.2786
2.64 (6)
1.1096
2.78 (6)
.6261
+0.14
E2.69 (2)
.4596
3.0 (2)
.4243
2.68 (4)
.4300
-0.32
F2.90 (3)
.5030
2.88 (3)
.4417
3.21 (3)
.4765
+0.33
G3.01 (3)
.5829
2.78 (3)
.2469
3.14 (3)
.1858
+0.36
H3.89 (1)3.80 (1)2.6 (1)-1.20
   
Fraternity GPA2.78 (18)2.83 (18)2.86 (20)+0.03

Cells: Mean (Number of Pledges)
Standard Deviation

 

 Spring, 1995Fall, 1995Spring, 1996Fall, 1996
Female - Freshmen2.40 (129)2.68 (635)2.46 (122)2.81 (761)
Female - Sophomores2.90 (675)2.89 (699)2.87 (681)2.92 (722)
Male - Freshmen2.43 (94)2.60 (329)2.27 (96)2.74 (375)
Male - Sophomores2.85 (400)2.79 (406)2.76 (358)2.81 (393)
     
 Spring, 1995Fall, 1995Spring, 1996Fall, 1996
Female-Fresh. & Soph.2.83 (804) 2.81 (803) 
Male-Fresh. & Soph.2.77 (494) 2.66 (454) 

Cells: Mean (Number of Students)

 


 

Appendix D


Examples of Community Service and Order of Omega


Many of the Geneseo fraternities and sororities have been participating in community service projects and philanthropies. These projects are one way Geneseo Greeks contribute to a positive environment on-campus and off-campus. Here are some examples from the Fall, 1996 semester.

Sigma KappaMemory Walk for Alzheimer's Disease
 Strides Against Breast Cancer for the American Cancer Society
 Donation to Maine Sea Coast Mission
 Week of Giving-Lollipop Sale for Alzheimer's Disease
 Nursing Home visit
 Thanksgiving Food Drive and others
  
Phi Kappa ChiHang Christmas Lights on Main Street in Geneseo
  
Alpha Epsilon PiAssisted in putting up the Homestead tree lights
  
Alpha Kappa PhiBowl for Breath for Cystic Fibrosis Foundation
  
Tau Kappa EpsilonBig Brother/Big Sister Softball Tournament
 Adopt-A-Highway
 Thanksgiving Food Drive to benefit St. Mary's Church in Geneseo
  
Omega Beta PsiHalloween Walk on Main Street in Geneseo
 Heart Association Walk in Geneseo
  
Alpha Chi RhoBig Brother/Big Sister Softball Tournament
 Thanksgiving Food Drive
 St. Mary's Soup Kitchen
 Interfaith Center Soup Kitchen
 Adopt-A-Highway
 Tutoring program for Geneseo Central School
  
Alpha Omega PiClothing Drive
 Big Brother/Big Sister Softball Tournament
 Bowl for Breath for Cystic Fibrosis Foundation
 Visited Pediatric Ward at Strong Memorial Hospital
 Penny Drive for American Heart Association
 Canned Goods Drive
  
Sigma Delta TauNational Council for the Prevention of Child Abuse
 American Cancer Society
 Thanksgiving Food Drive for Livingston County Soup Kitchens
 Heartside-aid professor in nurturing sick cats and finding suitable homes
  
Sigma Gamma PhiAdopt-A-Highway
 Fall decoration for the Children's Wing of Strong Memorial Hospital
Sigma Tau PsiSet-up and breakdown for the Boy Scouts¹ annual Western New York Farm Show


The Order of Omega is a national honor society which recognizes students for character, scholarship, intelligence, service and leadership in the Inter-Greek Affairs of their institution. On Thursday, November 21, 1996 the Geneseo Nu Alpha chapter inducted twenty-two new members into this society. These twenty-two students represent twelve chapters on this campus. The Geneseo chapter of National Order of Omega has inducted 90 members in its short-lived existence on our campus.

These students are excellent examples of how Greek Life can be a positive and contributing factor in our students' lives.

James AndersonTau Kappa Epsilon
Dan BarberPhi Kappa Chi
Scott BizubPhi Kappa Chi
Beth BorofskyAlpha Omega Pi
Elissa BuchtaAlpha Delta Epsilon
Thomas CondonSigma Tau Psi
Elizabeth ConlonAlpha Omega Pi
Joanna DiPasqualeDelta Phi Epsilon
Julie DuttonAlpha Kappa Phi
April FontaineAlpha Delta Epsilon
Michele GrabSigma Delta Tau
Lorna GreensladeAlpha Delta Epsilon
Bhagamshi KannegundlaAlpha Epsilon Pi
Michelle MacRoyAlpha Omega Pi
Natalie MooreAlpha Omega Pi
Matt MozianPhi Kappa Chi
Patrick MyersTau Kappa Epsilon
Megan O'ConnorPhi Lambda Chi
Michelle O'HareSigma Kappa
Shannon QuackenbushAlpha Delta Epsilon
Erin SheerinSigma Gamma Phi
Susan SmithPhi Lambda Chi

 

Appendix E


Alternatives to Hazing*


(*Sorority Hazing - A Researcher's Findings. Presentation at AFA Conference, 1991.)

 

1. Plan a weekend or overnight retreat away from your chapter room/house.

2. Encourage pledges to join a chapter committee.

3. Go to church.

4. Plan a cook-out with another sorority /fraternity pledge class, followed by a softball or football game.

5. Invite the IGC Advisor or President to answer questions about the Greek community.

6. Baby-sit children of area alumnae.

7. Visit your National headquarters, if nearby. Visit an area or national officer if they live nearby.

8. Invite a faculty member to dinner or a particular event.

9. Plan a project to improve the chapter room/house.

10. Encourage participation in campus activities.

11. Invite an international student to speak to the pledge class.

12. Inform pledges of cultural events on you campus.

13. Stress academics by offering seminars on study skills, test taking, time management, etc.

14. Familiarize pledges with National policies.

15. Encourage participation in leadership sessions on you campus (GOLD and Student Leadership Institute).

16. Get to know your Chapter Advisor!

17. Have a large "get-to-know each other" party, in which members and pledges swap signatures.

18. Sponsor a blood drive with the Red Cross. Invite other pledge classes to participate.

19. Offer a seminar on alcohol concerns.

20. Invite a lawyer to speak about alcohol liability.

21. "Adopt a mile" in your community to keep clean for a year.

22. If your university president has an open-door policy, go visit him/her.

23. Visit a nursing home.

24. Invite someone to speak on social skills and etiquette.

25. Conduct a canned food drive for Easter or Passover.

26. Invite an older alumnae to speak of her experiences as collegiate.

27. Have each pledge adopt a faculty member.

28. Conduct a seminar on student services and programs offered on you campus and their locations.

29. Coordinate a trick-or-treat event at Halloween for underprivileged children with other sororities.

30. Plan a dance-a-thon, swing-a-thon, or rock-a-thon- to raise money for your philanthropy.

31. Have a hand made craft sale and auction off items to the highest bidder from the sorority.

32. At the end of the term, gather clothing and other articles from pledges as they clean out their rooms. Give them to underprivileged children.

33. Do something special for your Chapter Advisor (baby-sit, clean their yard, send them flowers, etc.)

34. Hold a movie night in you chapter room/house.

35. Have a picnic with the local alumnae group.

36. Go roller skating or bowling.

37. Have a yogurt party.

38. Hold a "sisterhood circle" -sit in a circle in the dark, passing a lighted candle. Whoever holds the candle may express what the sorority means to her.

39. Go to a ropes course.

 

Appendix F


Advisors*


*(Material adapted from University of Maryland)

 

 

THE OFFICER-ADVISOR RELATIONSHIP*

 

Organization officers may expect an advisor to:


* Assist the group in formulating long range goals and in planning and initiating short term projects.

* Provide resource information pertaining to the goals and purpose of the organization.

* Suggest ways that meetings of the organization can be improved.

* Assist the officers in evaluating projects, performances and progress.

* Suggest ways that will increase the officer's leadership skills.

* Participate in social events.

* Be available when emergencies or problems arise.

* Attend meetings and programs.

 

An advisor may expect student officers to:


* Keep the advisor informed of all organizational activities, meetings, issues and agendas, and send the advisor minutes of all meetings.

* Meet regularly with the advisor to discuss organizational problems.

* Inform the advisor of any potential problems or concerns.

* Inform the advisor of programs and services sponsored by the organization.

 

Building an open and honest relationship between your chapter and an advisor requires considerable effort and time. How do you as a chapter leader build an open and honest relationship that affords you the opportunity to share ideas and receive feedback from your advisor? You may find the following statements helpful when building that relationship with your chapter advisor.


* The responsibility for building the relationship must be shared between advisor and student.

* The relationship must be based upon open, direct communication.

* Both must recognize their various roles and responsibilities in and outside of their activities position.

* Both advisor and student are human beings who make mistakes, follow their own value systems and work in individual professional and personal styles.

* Both advisor and student are continually growing, changing and learning, each within their own unique stages of development.

 


THE ROLE OF THE CHAPTER ADVISOR*

 

A chapter advisor can be an excellent form of support. Without reciprocal support from those being advised, however, nothing will be accomplished. Therefore, it is important to emphasize the significance of an advisor to the members of a chapter. Together, the advisor and the chapter members must strive to gain a better understanding of the relationship that exists between the chapter and the institution. It is also important to realize that having a committed chapter advisor can make a significant positive impact in all areas of chapter operation

Role of the Chapter Advisor

1. To assist the Faculty Advisor in the promotion of scholarship generally among the members of the chapter and promoting an atmosphere conducive for study conditions within the chapter house.
2. To assist the chapter officers, particularly the president and treasurer.
3. To advise the chapter in the understanding of electing and training competent chapter officers.
4. To work with the chapter officers in preparing the yearly Membership, Development Plan, Chapter Management Plan, Chapter Annual Report, and budgets and goals.
5. To speak with actives who are delinquent in their financial obligations to the chapter.
6. To interpret and explain alumni policies and actions to the chapter.
7. To express active chapter's feelings to alumni, when and where necessary.
8. To attend a majority of active chapter meetings.
9. To make every effort to attend each major chapter initiation event.
10. To ensure the chapter house is in proper condition (if applicable).
11. To attend national and regional meetings.
12. To give assistance and advice in rush planning and membership education functions.
13. To be familiar with, and advise the chapter on, the esoteric work.
14. To keep current with the University policies in general and, in particular, those pertaining to Greek chapters.
15. To discuss individual problems with members and try to give personal guidance.
16. To be an active participant in alumni groups.
17. To be familiar with Inter/National rules and regulations.
18. To assist with the implementation of a purposeful chapter retreat.


Where to find a Chapter Advisor

1. Inter/National or Regional Headquarters.
2. Campus advisors.
3. Housing corporations.
4. Alumni.
5. Other local chapters.
6. Use of a newsletter.


How do you know if the person is a "good fit?"

1. Can the person be depended upon for close and prompt cooperation?
2. Is the person on good terms with the members of the chapter?
3. Does the person have a healthy view of the chapter and the Greek system in general?
4. Does the person work well with college students?
5. Does the person have enough time to commit to the chapter?
6. Is the person fair-minded?
7. Is the person in good standing with the university administrators, the local chapter, the Inter/National chapter, the alumni, and the faculty?

 

Possible ways to honor the Chapter Advisor

1. Nominate him/her for an Inter/National chapter award.
2. Nominate him/her for a campus award.
3. Nominate him/her for a community service award.
4. Invite advisor to all chapter events.

 

THE ROLE OF THE FACULTY/STAFF ADVISOR*

 

A faculty/staff advisor can be an excellent form of support. Without reciprocal support from those being advised, however, nothing will be accomplished. Therefore, it is important to emphasize the significance of an advisor to the members of a chapter. Together, the advisor and the chapter members must strive to gain a better understanding of the relationship that exists between the chapter and the institution. It is also important to realize that having a committed faculty/staff advisor can make a significant positive impact in all areas of chapter operation, not scholarship alone.

The following points are suggested as a basis for obtaining and developing an effective faculty/staff advisor:

Possible Areas of Consideration for Advisory Assistance

* academic improvement
* study skills development
* new membership education
* leadership development programs*
* officer training*
* alumni development programs*
* relationships with other faculty and administration

* The advisor can serve as a source, assisting in locating relevant programs for chapter officers and members.


Role of the Faculty/Staff Advisor

1. The advisor's role is not static but dynamic. The advisor must continually adapt his/her activities to fit the ever-changing situations in the chapter.
2. A close working relationship between the chapter and the advisor is critical. Such a relationship will provide the opportunity for the advisor to serve as a teacher, counselor, mentor and friend.
3. The advisor should strive to continually help the chapter become as self-sufficient as possible.
4. The advisor should be interested in the individual and in the collective welfare of the chapter members, not just in the chapter's academic standing.
5. The advisor should recognize and accept the fact that there may be no direct results of his/her labors.
6. The advisor should work through the chapter officers and members in order to give them the opportunity to gain experience and self-confidence.


Who is most likely to be an effective faculty/staff advisor?

* someone who the chapter members and the college community respect and admire
* someone who can potentially develop positive, supportive relationships with chapter members

* someone who is willing to take the responsibility of maintaining some continual contact with chapter members

* someone who believes in the chapter's mission goals, and who is committed to helping chapter members accomplish those goals

* someone who receives respect, support, and recognition from the administration and from colleagues for his/her efforts


How to recruit a Faculty /Staff Advisor

* Ask each member to nominate his/her choice for a faculty/staff advisor and present list at chapter meeting for selection.

* Ask chapter members to identify individuals they feel may have the characteristics stated above.

* Invite these faculty or staff members to lunch, dinner, or a program to introduce them to the chapter.

* Provide nominees with a copy of the chapter's mission goals statement and a list of things the chapter is currently doing in regards to scholarship. In addition, the chapter should draft a description of the desired direction of the chapter, and the role that the faculty/staff advisor would play in accomplishing those goals.

* Use alumni as a resource.


Possible ways to honor a Faculty /Staff Advisor

1. Nominate him/her for a National chapter award.
2. Nominate him/her for a campus award.
3. Nominate him/her for a community service award.
4. Invite advisor to all scholarship banquets (If you do not currently have a scholarship banquet, implement one).
5. Take pride in the fact that you have a faculty/staff advisor and invite him/her to chapter events.

 

Appendix G


Coordinator of Greek Affairs - Example Job Description


Position Title: Coordinator of Greek Affairs

Percent of Full-time position: at least 25%; ideally 50%.

Responsible for the development, coordination, implementation and evaluation of a program to provide administrative support for fraternities and sororities.

 

* Advise Inter-Greek Council.
* Organize rush orientation.
* Collect Rush registration sheets.
* Check eligibility of rushees and notify those ineligible.
* Collect lists of individuals who accept bids.
* Aid in the production and distribution of Greek brochures.
* Coordinate pledge appeal process and notify students of status of appeals.
* Develop and coordinate Greek Educational and Leadership Workshop once a semester.
* Develop and coordinate skills workshops.
* Develop and coordinate time management workshops for new members.
* Tabulate individual chapter and all-Greek grade point averages.
* Assist in the organization of Greek Week once a semester.
* Maintain active membership lists, including lists of pledges initiated.
* Produce and distribute information regarding hazing.
* Provide positive team building alternatives to "traditional" pledge activities.
* Collect information on depledges.
* Advise and maintain Order of Omega.
* Coordinate excellence awards.
* Serve as campus liaison to inter/national headquarters.
* Communicate with inter/national headquarters on problems and successes with chapters.
* Hold membership in Association of Fraternity Advisors (AFA).
* Serve as a representative of the Division of Student and Campus Life.
* Serve in other capacities related to Greek Life at the discretion of the Vice President of Student and Campus Life.