College Senate Bulletin

Bulletin No. 14
February 19, 2004
Contents


Agenda for All College Meeting on February 24, 2004
Agenda for Senate Meeting on February 24, 2004
Announcements
Spring 2004 Senate Meeting Schedule
Message from the Chair
Correction to Minutes of January 27, 2004 College Senate Meeting
Senate Small Grant Recipient Named
Minutes of the Faculty Affairs Committee Meeting, February 10, 2004
Minutes of the Executive Committee Meeting, February 10, 2004
Minutes of the UCC Meeting, February 17, 2004
UCC Proposal Summaries

Correspondence: Charlie Freeman, Department of Physics,

Greene 202; e-mail: freeman@geneseo.edu; phone: 245-5286


Agenda: All College Meeting, February 24, 2004

Call to Order

Nominations Committee Report

 

Presentation of Nominees for Senate Vice-Chair

  • Maria Lima, English

Presentation of Nominees for Senate Secretary

  • Savitri Iyer, Physics

Presentation of Nominees for Senate Treasurer

  • Ming-Mei Chang, Biology

Presentation of Nominees for Senator at Large - over 6 years (5 open positions)

  • Sharon Bossung, School of Business
  • Walter Freed, English
  • Edward Gillin, English
  • Darrell Norris, Geography
  • D. Jeffrey Over, Geology
  • Margaret Stolee, History
  • Michael Teres, Art
  • Edward Wallace, Mathematics

Presentation of Nominees for Senator at Large - under 6 years (3 open positions)

  • Anne Eisenberg - Sociology
  • H. Christina Geiger - Chemistry
  • Rosemary McEwen - Foreign Languages
  • Alice Rutkowski - English
  • Teresa Zollo - Computer Science

Call for additional nominations for Vice Chair, Secretary, Treasurer, and Senators at Large (additional nominations for these positions may be made from the floor).

Presentation of Nominees for NatSci/Math/CompSci Rep on General Education Committee

  • Kurtis Fletcher, Physics
  • Jeff Johannes, Math
  • Olympia Nicodemi, Math

Presentation of Nominees for Professional Programs Rep on General Education Committee

  • Kathleen Jones, Communicative Disorders and Sciences
  • Jane Fowler Morse, School of Education

Presentation of Nominees for NatSci/Math/CompSci Rep on Professional Leave Review Committee

  • Isidro Bosch, Biology
  • David Johnson, Chemistry

Presentation of Nominees for Humanities Rep on Professional Leave Review Committee

  • Rachel Hall, English
  • David Tamarin, History

Presentation of Nominees for Social Sciences Rep on Professional Leave Review Committee

  • Joseph Bulsys, Communication
  • Steve Derne, Sociology
  • Daniel Repinski, Psychology

Adjournment

Agenda: Senate Meeting on February 24, 2004

Call to Order

Adoption of the Agenda

Approval of the Minutes of the Previous Meeting

p. 134, Senate Bulletin 13, with corrections on page 145 of this bulletin

Senate Reports

President Christopher Dahl

Provost David Gordon

Chair Charles Freeman

Vice Chair Gregg Hartvigsen

Treasurer Errol Putman

University Senator William Gohlman

Central Council Liz Dance

Reports of the Standing Committees of the Senate

Undergraduate Curricula Cynthia Klima

First Readings

New Courses:

COMN 391, Seminar: Issues in Communication (p. 150)

Course Revisions:

CDSC 310 Literacy Development (p. 149)

CDSC 330 Clinical Intervention I (p. 149)

CDSC 331 Clinical Intervention II (p. 149)

GEOG 371 Synoptic Climatology (p. 151)

GEOG 250 American Landscapes, add U/ Core (p. 151)

Course Deletions:

COMN 301 Topics in Journalism: (subtitle) (p. 151)

COMN 351 Issues in Political Communication: (subtitle) (p. 151)

COMN 364 Seminar: Issues & Problems in Broadcasting (p. 151)

Major Revisions:

Communication BA (p. 150)

Geography BA (p. 151)

International Relations BA proposal 1 (p. 152)

International Relations BA proposal 2 (p. 152)

Second Readings:

New Courses:

ANTH 234 Social Anthropology (p. 120)

MATH 239 Introduction to Mathematical Proof (p. 120)

ECON 365 International Macroeconomics (p. 122)

ECON 293 Honors Seminar in Economics I (p. 122)

Course Revisions:

ACCT 211 Intermediate Financial Accounting II (p. 121)

ACCT 310 Introduction to Federal Income Taxation (p. 122)

CSCI 242 Analysis of Algorithms (p. 121)

ECON 364 International Trade and Economic Policy (p. 122)

ECON 393 Honors Seminar n Economics II (p. 122)

GEOG 365 Geography of Islam, add M/core, (p. 122)

MATH 237 Introduction to Discrete Mathematics (p. 121)

Major Revisions:

B.A. in Mathematics (p. 121)

B.A. in Mathematics with Adolescent Certification (p. 121)

B.A. in Theater (p. 120)

B.S. in Accounting (p. 121)

Minor Revisions:

Asian Studies Minor (p. 122)

Minor in Mathematics (p. 121)

 

Undergraduate Policies Harold Hoops

First Reading: Proposed Faculty-Option Attendance Policy (please see proposal in Policy minutes in Senate Bulletin 13, page 130)

Graduate Academic Affairs Dale Metz

Second Reading:

New Course: ACCT 510 (p. 125)

Student Affairs Michael Lynch

Faculty Affairs Rosanne Hartman

Old Business

New Business

Resolution on Senate Response to Swastikas found on Campus (see Executive Committee Minutes, this bulletin, p. 147)

Adjournment

Spring 2004 College Senate Meeting Schedule

All Senate Meetings: 4:00 pm, Newton 204
February 24 (preceded by the All-College Meeting at which the Committee on Nominations will report)
March 23
April 20

Message from the Chair

The All College Meeting on February 24, 2004 at 4 pm in Newton 204 will be held to:

  • present the slate of nominees for Senate officers (Vice-Chair, Treasurer, Secretary), Senators at Large, Professional Leave Review Committee, and General Education Committee members
  • accept nominations for Senate officers and Senators at Large from the floor. Additional nominations for Professional Leave Review Committee and General Education Committee members cannot be made from the floor, since the process for deciding these nominees has already been completed by the nominations committee.

The current slate of nominees for these positions is published in the All College Meeting Agenda on page 143. Sincere thanks to the nominations committee: Melissa Sutherland (chair), Jane Fowler Morse, Rachel Hall, Duane McPherson, Amy Sheldon, and Jasmine Tang for their hard work on this committee.

Correction to Minutes of January 27, 2004 College Senate Meeting

The minutes of the January 27, 2004 College Senate Meeting, printed in Senate Bulletin 13, mistakenly indicated that a proposed revision to GEOG 250 passed a first reading. However, this course revision was removed from the agenda for the January 27, 2004 meeting and therefore was not brought up for a vote by the College Senate.

Senate Small Grant Recipient Named

Congratulations to Ren Vasiliev (Geography) on being named recipient of a Senate Small Grant for her proposal entitled "NAMES: A Journal of Onomastics"

Minutes of the Faculty Affairs Committee Meeting, February 10, 2004

Present: Bearden, J., Bicket, D., Esch, M., Everett, T., Fletcher, K., Hannam, K., Hartman, R., Johnson, D., Pretzer, R., Tze-Ki, H., Youssef, C.

1. Old Business:

A. Calendar Changes and Faculty Response

 

Members of the committee were presented with a written summary of faculty responses to the calendar changes. The same summary has been sent to Provost Gordon and President Dahl for consideration along with written faculty comments. In general, of the faculty who contacted R. Hartman, most were in favor of extending the semester break for another week. Reasons cited were pedagogy (e.g.: course preparation issues), research (e.g.: time needed to begin/complete research projects, answer conference calls for papers), and conflicts with conference attendance. Some student concerns were also included.

Members of the committee questioned the types of responses and if there were any positive comments received concerning calendar changes. R. Hartman noted the comments were mostly negative. However, if faculty felt positively or negatively towards the change, they could still contact her and that information would be forwarded to Provost Gordon. After some discussion, it was decided that the committee would wait to hear a response from the Provost Gordon and President Dahl before further consideration.

B. Fire Drills. Captain Ossont contacted R. Hartman about the fire drills this semester. The weather and staffing has not permitted any fire drills to occur in the academic areas this semester. Efforts will be made to complete as many as possible in one day.

2. No new business.

Respectfully submitted,

Rosanne Hartman,

Chairperson, Faculty Affairs

Minutes of the Executive Committee Meeting, February 10, 2004

Attending: C. Dahl, D. Gordon, C. Freeman, T. Bazzett, J. Boiani, E. Putman, W. Gohlman, L. Dance, R. Hartman, D. Metz, H. Hoops, C. Klima, C. Faulkner

Approval of Minutes

Last Meeting (January 13, 2004), p 118, Bulletin 12--approved

New Business:

Jim Boiani, Department of Chemistry and President, CAS Board of Directors will discuss guidelines for selecting faculty members on the CAS Board (see memo from Jim Boiani printed in Senate Bulletin 13 page 138)

Boiani: trustees specified that faculty reps to CAS should be selected by campus governance body, so we need to meet this resolution. Proposes that senate select the three faculty reps to CAS board. Suggests just adding these to other senate elections. CAS can continue to find nominees, or nominations committee can do it.

Bazzett: CAS should do nominees to make it easier—Nominations committee has trouble finding nominees as is.

Gohlman: but campus governance wouldn’t select in that case, would be whole campus. Campus governance could abdicate responsibility.

Bazzett: this would just be campus governance using CAS to select nominees

Boiani: it’s in the spirit of campus governance

Freeman: who is eligible to serve?

Boiani: teaching faculty

Freeman: voters would be teaching faculty?

Boiani: yes.

Bazzett: might have to be added to the constitution, and faculty would have to vote on new procedures going into constitution

Freeman: the key issue is whether nominees should be selected by nominations committee or CAS board

Gohlman: have CAS bring nominations to floor of senate and senate can accept

Bazzett: will integrate into process we already have

Freeman: will come up with new language to bring before senate. Bring to next executive committee meeting to approve.

Boiani: an amendment has to go on the ballot

Reports

… Chair's Report - Charles Freeman: Nominations committee getting nominations for officers and at-large senators. Please submit names or encourage people to volunteer. Thanks exec committee for coming to meet the Provost candidates. University Faculty Senate update: heard speech given by Chancellor King who discussed new tuition plan for a small increase in tuition each year. When students entered Geneseo they would be guaranteed locked in four year rate. If take 5 years to graduate would pay tuition set in second year of student’s undergraduate career. Chancellor also wanted UFS to come up with policy on faculty academic misbehavior (e.g. plagiarism). What is university’s responsibility for disclosure? Governance Committee of UFS passed resolution calling for increased support of faculty governance organizations at different SUNYs. All things they call for in this resolution we are already doing at Geneseo (release time for chair, secretarial support, etc). Freeman thinks Senate should make a statement about recent swastiskas on campus. Has draft. Central Council has already passed resolution.

Draft of Resolution on Swastikas found on Campus

WHEREAS: The swastika is a symbol of racial and religious oppression, used by the Nazi party as an emblem of anti-Semitism and

WHEREAS: The presence of these symbols on our campus may create a climate of insecurity and vulnerability for members of the Geneseo community

Be it RESOLVED THAT: the College Senate recognizes the rights of all members of this community to live and learn on a campus free from intimidation and harassment.

and FURTHER RESOLVED THAT: the College Senate denounces the recent actions taken by individuals which display hateful symbols across campus

and FURTHER RESOLVED THAT: the College Senate applauds the efforts of the students, faculty and staff who, in the wake of these incidents, have participated in activities designed to bring about constructive dialogue and a greater understanding of the issues pertaining to this matter.

Klima: do we know who did this?

Dahl: no, trying to find out. Don’t know what meaning symbols intended to have. There were three episodes in a week. College made its position clear in an all students memo. Some were magic markers on white boards, other was food stuff. After second incident, Sancilio and Bonfiglio made clear college didn’t condone. Nothing has happened since those three incidents. We have to take presence of symbol seriously. We are trying to build diverse community where everyone feels accepted. This incident particularly disturbed African American and Latino students b/c they had heard attacks on affirmative action. Would be useful for Senate to make clear its position. Senate already accepted without debate college’s statement on diversity. Dahl also concerned, wants to make a presidential statement that affirms college’s commitment to admission’s policy that encourages diversity but also speaks to symbolism and campus atmosphere. A diverse community is essential to excellence of public liberal arts college. Our diversity statement says we support vigorous expression of different views, as part of intellectual process that builds student minds. Don’t want to attack academic freedom or create uniformity. We need to create community where diverse opinions and backgrounds are accepted and included, and where we can move to more difficult task of trying to carry on conversations with disagreement without tearing community apart. Swastikas a wake up call to keep goals in mind—supporting diverse student body and a community with vibrant intellectual exchange.

Freeman: college council meeting got me thinking about these issues and how the College Senate should respond. It was moving to hear about freshman who put together discussion forum.

Dahl: Cindy Durand, freshperson in Niagara Hall, put together group of 175 people. Did ice breaking games, etc. Philosophy Club also sponsored discussion that night, moderated by students.

Bazzett: motion to accept resolution

Putman: amend second line to read “Nazi Party and other contemporary hate groups”

Dahl: Putman has worked on curriculum and holocaust awareness in schools

Freeman: accepted as friendly amendment. Resolution passes

… President's Report - Christopher Dahl: Also wanted to thank exec comm. for meeting with Provost candidates. Gave a rundown of content at last senate meeting, but want to offer updates and 6 point advocacy position for college. Chancellor has been quite direct in saying that we need at least $50 million lost through decreased tuition increase, we need it b/c SUNY system is hurting particularly in college sector b/c the tuition revenues went to graduate centers and statutory colleges. Chancellor has been quite explicit about this issue. As college we’ll have a clear position in keeping with system’s position: restore $50 million dollars in SUNY budget; restore 10% cut to EOP program; system is remaining quiet on TAP, but Geneseo will lobby against governor’s plan to have students loan TAP money to the state; want to insure second and final phase of science project be funded appropriately; support for new SUNY capital plan (1.8 billion, our share 32 million); lobby for amendments to strange matching capital program, which gives money to private colleges with few strings attached. Only graduate centers and private colleges will be the only ones who can come up with matching. State has obligation to SUNY first.

Metz: What are tuition increases linked to? Inflation?

Dahl: Unclear. If state continues to lower tax support, this will hurt campuses. Will be nightmare for campuses managing 8 different tuition rates. We should be able to set tuition based on Geneseo’s needs. It would work only if state agreed to pick up incremental costs. Budget not good, but not horrendous. Can’t produce something with no funding. Will lobby for Geneseo to receive different funding based on our mission. We won’t add students if we’re not funded to add students. Chancellor is finally realizing this.

… Provost's Report - David Gordon: As way of providing ongoing discussion of diversity issues, wants to establish series of faculty talks on various aspects of diversity, perhaps once a month. Draw upon local expertise to have academic discussion of issues. Diversity commission discussing something similar, perhaps could cosponsor.

Dahl: Lots of people doing interesting research. But people on campus also don’t know the facts about the college’s diversity programs like EOP. We need to be model for educating and understanding diversity.

Gordon: supplement Dahl’s annual lecture. Perhaps create video library.

… Vice Chair - Gregg Hartvigsen: absent

… Past Chair - Terence Bazzett: no report. Members of exec committee should try to come to provost candidate meeting this Thursday.

… Secretary - Carol Faulkner: no report

… Treasurer - Errol Putman: Contribute to senate fund!

… University Faculty Senator - William Gohlman: I think word finally getting to system administration that there is no support for intrusive assessment or standardized tests. Chancellor has also discovered this and is stepping back. Resolution on bulletin p. 141. UFS did similar thing to what we did at our senate meeting: We’re willing to keep talking, but we’re very dissatisfied with everything we’ve seen so far. UUP taking same position as college on budget, but also that salary increases be taken care of by state. Some positive movement in contract negotiations.

… Central Council - Liz Dance: last Thursday 15 senators met and discussed upcoming attendance policy change. Students divided on issue. More discussions to come. Also discussed system wide assessment resolution. Dance, Evelyn Rodriquez, and Kelly Clark planning a take back community day, to celebrate diversity and address racism and discrimination. Also planning a SUNY and budget advocacy day.

Committee Reports

… Faculty Affairs Committee - Rosanne Hartman: Meeting today at 4:00 in Welles. Will continue to discuss calendar.

… Graduate Affairs - Dale Metz: no report

… Policy Committee - Harold Hoops: Will be proposing to college senate a modification of current attendance policy, partly based on different kinds of students and different kinds of courses. Under certain conditions, restrictions on not using attendance in grading would be removed.

… UCC - Cynthia Klima: Will be meeting Feb. 17 at 4:00 to discuss 10 proposals

… Student Affairs Committee - Michael Lynch: student health and safety working group proposed a first semester seminar next fall. SAC working on statement addressing needs of students with disabilities for inclusion on syllabi.

Old Business

New Business

Minutes of the UCC Meeting, February 17, 2004

Present: Cynthia Klima-Chair, Olympia Nicodemi, Xiao Chen, Anna P. Kline, Zhiming Zhao, Kathleen Hursh, Sue Ann Brainard, Amy Stanley, Bob Owens, Denise Sullivan

Excused: Anneliese Weibel, Darrell Norris, Sid Bosch

Absent: Steve Swift, Joseph Cope

Guests: Ed Spicka, Ren Vasiliev

Meeting came to order at 4:05 pm. The Committee considered 16 proposals for first readings. Two Psychology proposals for PSYC 366 and PSYC 365 were tabled pending further clarification from the Psychology Dept. A future meeting will be scheduled when those clarifications are received.

Meeting adjourned at 4:25 pm.

Respectfully submitted,

Cynthia Klima – Foreign Languages

UCC Chair

UCC Proposal Summaries

Full versions of these proposals are available on the web at http://www.geneseo.edu/~doc/ucc/forms.shtml

CDSC 310 Literacy Development: Delete prerequisite CDSC 241 and add prerequisites CDSC 243 and CDSC 244.

Rationale: CDSC 241 Fluency and Voice Intervention is not being offered. CDSC 243 and CDSC 244 are new program requirements.

CDSC 330 Clinical Intervention I: Delete prerequisite CDSC 241 and add prerequisites CDSC 243 and CDSC 244.

Rationale: CDSC 241 Fluency and Voice Intervention is not being offered. CDSC 243 and CDSC 244 are new program requirements.

CDSC 331 Clinical Intervention II: Delete prerequisite CDSC 241 and add prerequisites CDSC 243 and CDSC 244.

Rationale: CDSC 241 Fluency and Voice Intervention is not being offered. CDSC 243 and CDSC 244 are new program requirements.

Communication BA Major: Deleting COMN 351 and COMN 354, adding COMN 391 Seminar: Issues in Communication.

Rationale:

This new, open-subtitled Communication seminar will allow faculty members greater flexibility to offer a seminar experience based more closely on their own areas of research. The idea is to expand the seminar principle and make it flexible enough to offer all faculty members the chance to helm a seminar course. This seminar could be offered multiple times, and students may take it up to two times, for COMN credit, provided each iteration is offered under a different heading.

New course could also streamline the curriculum, by replacing the mish-mash of seminar-type courses that have emerged, especially on the journalism/media studies track, e.g.:

* COMN 301 Topics in Journalism: (subtitle/slot course)

* COMN 351 Issues in Political Communication: (subtitle/slot course)

* COMN 364 Issues and Problems in Broadcasting

(Note that course deletion forms for each of the above courses have been submitted in conjunction with this proposal).

The new course will be flexible enough to cover multiple subtitles, based on faculty members' interests. The first iteration will likely be in Fall 2004 (titled as a seminar on Globalization and International Communications). This will likely be offered as an experimental course pending finalization of the proposal.

Other examples of possible seminar offerings under this new course:

* Seminar on Globalization and International Communications: This examines issues and recent research relating to media's role in an emerging global society. Issues include historical context, culture/media imperialism vs. hybridity, global media trade issues, critical political economy of global media, contributions of scholars such as Hamelink, McChesney, Bagdikian, Tomlinson.

* Seminar on New Media Technologies and Society: This examines issues and recent research relating to the role of new media technology in our modern/postmodern society. It covers the rise of information theory, media/technological determinism vs. symptomatic technology, contributions of scholars such as McLuhan, Williams, Castells.

* Seminar on The Rhetorical Presidency: An in-depth examination of the interrelationship of the modern U.S. presidency, 1960-present, with rhetorical expression. This seminar will focus on the extant scholarship in political communication published in the field of Communication and the critical methods used to analyze the rhetorical dimensions of the presidency.

* Seminar on Rhetoric and Philosophy: Ways of Knowing: An examination of selected texts in philosophy and rhetorical theory that explore questions of epistemology. Attention will be focused upon the manner in which epistemology was divorced from rhetorical inquiry and practice by Plato and the impact of Plato's view on contemporary debate about rhetoric's role in the construction of knowledge.

* The Role and Influence of Communication in Community Activism: This course would examine the role of communication in the process of community activism. Issues to be considered include the role of interpersonal and organizational communication as well as broader issues of media effects and the role of journalism. The focus will be on how people's communication influences the success and/or failure of community initiatives. The role of communication in different community contexts will be explored.

COMN 391, Seminar: Issues in Communication (new course)

A seminar focusing on a topic or related group of topics in mass communication, journalism, rhetoric, or

interpersonal/organizational communication. The seminar will incorporate in-class discussion of relevant theory and topical issues as well as independent research related to the selected topics(s). May be taken no more than twice under different subtitles. Prerequisites: COMN 135 and one 300-level communication course or permission of the instructor. 3(3-0). Offered once yearly.

Rationale: This is a new course, and it is conceived as a course that will count as a trackrelated course for either the Journalism/Mass Communication or Interpersonal/Organizational track. However, it is not a required course. As explained below, the new course is designed to streamline the communication curriculum and replace certain upper-division courses that are currently offered under multiple course numbers and titles for the first time (i.e., COMN 301, COMN 351, COMN 364). The addition of the new course will thus result in a net reduction of two course titles from the curriculum. This is a positive outcome given the role of the new course. Furthermore, the seminar nature of the course, and its role within the curriculum, is flexible enough to enable it to be offered as often as other curriculum-related exigencies allow. In other words, it might be offered more than once during some semesters, and perhaps not at all in other semesters; it would depend on the needs of the department and the curriculum in any given semester. Having said that, it is expected that the seminar could be offered at least twice during the year, and possibly more often.

COMN 301, Topics in Journalism: (subtitle) (course deletion)

Rationale: This course deletion proposal is submitted in conjunction with two others - for COMN 351, Issues in Political Communication and COMN 364, Issues and Problems in Broadcasting - as well as a new course proposal for COMN 391, Issues in Communication. The three courses submitted for deletion are all upperdivision seminar-type courses that will be replaced by a single course: COMN 391, designed as an open-subtitled Communication seminar that will allow faculty members greater flexibility to offer a seminar experience based more closely on their own areas of research. The idea is to streamline the curriculum and make the new course flexible enough to offer all faculty members the chance to helm a seminar course. Thus COMN 301 becomes redundant, and it can be safely deleted.

COMN 351 Issues in Political Communication: (subtitle) (course deletion)

Rationale: This course deletion proposal is submitted in conjunction with two others -- for COMN 301, Topics in Journalism and COMN 364, Issues and Problems in Broadcasting - as well as a new course proposal for COMN 391, Issues in Communication. The three courses submitted for deletion are all upper-division seminar-type courses that will be replaced by a single course: COMN 391, designed as an open-subtitled Communication seminar that will allow faculty members greater flexibility to offer a seminar experience based more closely on their own areas of research. The idea is to streamline the curriculum and make the new course flexible enough to offer all faculty members the chance to helm a seminar course. Thus COMN 351 becomes redundant, and it can be safely deleted.

COMN 364 Seminar: Issues & Problems in Broadcasting (course deletion)

Rationale: This course deletion proposal is submitted in conjunction with two others -- for COMN 301, Topics in Journalism and COMN 351, Issues in Political Communication - as well as a new course proposal for COMN 391, Issues in Communication. The three courses submitted for deletion are all upper-division seminar-type courses that will be replaced by a single course: COMN 391, designed as an open-subtitled Communication seminar that will allow faculty members greater flexibility to offer a seminar experience based more closely on their own areas of research. The idea is to streamline the curriculum and make the new course flexible enough to offer all faculty members the chance to helm a seminar course. Thus COMN 364 becomes redundant, and it can be safely deleted.

GEOG 250 American Landscapes: This course is proposed for Core credit in U.S. History (U/ Core)

Rationale: GEOG 250, American Landscapes, is proposed as a course meeting the United States History College common core graduation requirement. The focus of the course is American material-cultural historical geography from the colonial period to the automobile age. The emphasis is consistently on the social, economic, and esthetic or ideological contexts of material-cultural forms, as well as their distribution, and spread. The student is, therefore, repeatedly asked to consider and absorb the rootedness of material culture and its landscape assemblages in the ground of shifting historical circumstance. American domestic-architectural practices are a case in point. Comparable contextual emphasis is given to gravestones, barns, fences, main street morphology, and several elements of the American roadside during the automobile era. American Landscapes was launched in the mid-1980s and has been a popular offering ever since. Education students, for example, appreciate the course's emphasis on field investigation that can be readily adapted to history/social studies in middle and high school grades.

GEOG 371, Synoptic Climatology: Add prerequisite of GEOG 110 or permission of instructor.

Rationale: A "prerequisite" should have been included in the course description for GEOG 371 when the course was proposed and approved as a new course in 1995. "GEOG 371 is adequately prepared for the upper-level course material.

Geography BA major: Add GEOG 382 Climate Change and Variability and GEOG 386 Application in Geography Information Science to fulfill the Advanced Physical and Elective components.

Rationale: Two new geography courses approved by Senate 12/2/03, GEOG 382--Climate Change and Variability and GEOG 386--Applications in Geographic Information Science (GIScience): subtitle (1 credit hour), are being recommended, respectively, to fulfill the Advanced Physical and Elective components of the major. Students taking GEOG 386 would need to take two additional geography electives, since the course is for only 1 credit hour.

International Relations BA major (proposal 1): ANTH 232 Native Voices: China (title change), ANTH 301 Religion, Society and Culture (title change), ANTH 208 Classics of Ethnography (ANTH 100 prerequisite, hence asterisk required in Catalog), GEOG 260 Deleted by Geography Department, ANTH 313 Global Health Issues (New course, add to Developing World Track), HIST 214 British Isles: Four Nations in Contact and Conflict (New course, add to European Track).

Rationale: The changes reflect changes already made by departments whose courses are included in the interdisciplinary major in International Relations.

International Relations BA major (proposal 2): Add ECON 365 International Macroeconomics) to Global Political Economy Track.

Rationale: The School of Business has altered its curriculum by dividing ECON 364 into two separate courses, ECON 364 and 365. Both courses are relevant for the International Relations major in the Global Political Economy track.