College Senate Bulletin

Bulletin No. 13
March 3rd, 2003

Contents

 
Agenda All College Meeting -11 March, 2003
Agenda College Senate Meeting -11 March, 2003
Announcements:                      
Spring Senate Meeting Dates
Call for Nominations for Senate Officers
Faculty Referendum Vote
Senate Small Grant Recipients - Spring 2003

Minutes of Student Affairs Committee - 18 February, 2003
Minutes of the Senate Executive Committee Meeting - 25 February 2003
Minutes of
Graduate Academic Affairs Committee - 18 February, 2003
GAAC Proposal Summaries

 

 

Correspondence:  Terence Bazzett, Department of Psychology,

Sturges 34; e-mail: bazzett@geneseo.edu; phone: (245)-5248

All College Meeting Agenda

March 11th, 2003

Call to Order

Adoption of the Agenda

Nominations Committee call for Nominations from the Floor

Senate Vice Chair

Senate Secretary

Senate Treasurer

Senator at Large-over 6 years

Senator at Large-under 6 years

Old Business

New Business

Adjournment

 

College Senate Meeting Agenda

March 11th, 2003

Call to Order

Adoption of the Agenda

Approval of the Minutes of the Previous Meetings

pp. 108-115, Senate Bulletin #12

Senate Reports

President                    Christopher Dahl

Provost                       Barbara Dixon

Chair                           Terence Bazzett           

Vice Chair                  Charles Freeman

Treasurer                   Maryellen Schmidt

University Senator     William Gohlman

Central Council          Joshua Lieberman

 

Reports of the Standing Committees of the Senate

Undergraduate Curricula                   Joan Zook

Second Reading (summaries in this bulletin #11)

   New Course

New Course – MATH 380 (p. 100)

   Course Deletion

Course Deletion – SOCL 285 (p. 100)

   Concentration Revision

Concentration Revision - SOCL Concentration (p. 100)

   Course Revisions

                Course Revision - ANTH 202 (p. 100­)

                Course Revision - ANTH 207 (p. 100­)

                Course Revision - ANTH 211 (p. 100­)

                Course Revision - ANTH 215 (p. 100­)

                Course Revision - ANTH 229 (p. 100­)

                Course Revision - ANTH 310 (p. 101)

                Course Revision - ANTH 321 (p. 101)

                Course Revision - EDUC 215 (p. 101)

                Course Revision - ECED 333 (p. 101)

                Course Revision - ECED 331 (p. 101)

                Course Revision - COMN 363 (p. 101)

                Course Revision - THEA 225 (p. 101)

Course Revision - THEA 320 (p. 101)

Course Revision - THEA 333 (p. 101)

Course Revision - THEA 342 (p. 101)

Course Revision - THEA 344 (p. 101)

Course Revision - THEA 346 (p. 101)

Course Revision - THEA 311 (p. 101)

Course Revision - THEA 340 (p. 101)

                Course Revision - THEA 330 (p. 101)

 

Undergraduate Policies                     Edward Gillin

 

Graduate Academic Affairs   Dale Metz

First Reading: (summaries in bulletins #12 & current bulletin).

  Course Revisions/Modifications

SPED 503: Special Education: Foundation and Legal Issues  (p. 115)

SPED 504: Assessment and Program Evaluation (p. 116)

EDUC 504: Educational Research Methodology (p. 116)

SPED 505: Transition in Educational and Community Settings (p. 116)

SPED 506: Applied Behavior Analysis (p. 116)

SPED 507: Seminar in Special Education (p. 116)

SPED 515: Emotional Disturbance/Behavioral Disorders: Characteristics (p. 116)

SPED 516: Emotional Disturbance/Behavioral Disorders: Interventions (p. 116)

SPED 525: Academic Strategies (p. 117)

SPED 541 Learning Disabilities: Characteristics (p. 117)

SPED 542: Learning Disabilities: Interventions (p. 117)

  New Courses

SPED 525: Academic Strategies (p. 117)

                SPED 590: Master’s Project: Design and Implementation (p. 117)

                SPED591: Master’s Project: Dissemination (p. 117)

  Program Revision

Revised M.S. in Education: Special Education program (p. 115)

 

  Revised Course Descriptions

Curr 436: Teaching Young Adult Literature (p.129)

Curr 438: Teaching Literature, Birth Through Sixth Grade (p.130)

Curr 440: Content Area Reading/Literacy in the Secondary School (p.130)

Curr 479: Computers and Technology in Reading/Language Arts: Workshop (p.130)

Curr 510: Foundations of Literacy Education (p.130)

Curr 511: Materials and Methods in Reading/Literacy (p.130)

Curr 512: Diagnosis and Assess in Reading and Literacy: Early Childhood and Childhood (p.130)

Curr 517: Advanced Clinical Experience in Reading/Literacy (p.131)

Curr 520: Teaching of Reading for Secondary, College and Adult Students (p.131)

Educ 522: Diagnosis and Assess. in Reading and Literacy: Middle Childhood and Adolesc (p.131)

Curr 530: Language Arts Methods for the Elementary School (p.131)

Curr 535: Action Research in Reading and Literacy (p.131)

  New Courses

Curr 513: Practicum: Meeting the Needs of Diverse Readers: (Early Childhood OR Childhood

  OR Middle Childhood OR Adolescent) (p.131)

Curr 514: Reading and Literacy Learning in a Diverse Society (p.132)

  New Programs

M.S. in Education: Teaching of Reading and Literacy, Birth through Grade 6 (p.127)

M.S. in Education: Teacher of Reading and Literacy, Grade 5 to Adult (p.128)

 

Student Affairs                                   Michael Lynch

 

Faculty Affairs                                   Rosanne Hartman

 

Old Business

New Business

Adjournment

 

Announcements:

Spring 2003 College Senate Meeting Schedule: All meetings will begin at 4:00 P.M. and will be held in Newton 204.

·        March 11th - Preceded by the All College Meeting

·        April 8th

·         May 6th

 

Nominations for Senate Offices

The Nominations Committee is seeking nominations for Senate Officers and is required by the Constitution of the Faculty to present a slate consisting of at least two nominees for each position. Please, consider running for Senate office positions.  To nominate yourself or a colleague, contact Anne Eisenberg, Chair of the Nominations Committee (Sociology Department, eisenber @geneseo.edu).

 

Faculty Referendum

Voting on the resolution opposing the President's plan to engage in war with Iraq concluded with 188 votes cast by 449 eligible faculty members who received ballots.  The vote tally was 119 in favor of the resolution and 69 opposed to the resolution.  Thank you to all faculty members who took the time to discuss and vote on this important issue.

 

Senate Small Grant Recipients

Congratulations to the following recipients of Senate Small Grants for the Spring 2003:

Emilye Crosby - History

African American Freedom Struggle in Clairborne County, MS

Anne Eisenberg - Sociology

Tracing the Roots of a Social Movement - Data Collection

Helen Myers - School of Performing Arts

National/International Film Festivals

Michael Oberg - History

The Short but Ironic Live of Sylvester Long

Barbara Welker - Anthropology

Proximate Mechanisms Involved in Male Howling Behavior, Alouatta Palliata

 

Minutes:

Minutes of Student Affairs Committee

February 18, 2003

 

Committee Members Present: M. Lynch, J. Sergio, L. Zoller, J. Principe, C, Rowley, J. Tang, W. Freed, C. Tang, M. Esch, B. Nash, K. Davies, M. Fratto

Guests: J. Van Remmen, J. Remy

Committee Members Absent:  C. Annala, R. Holthaus, D. McPherson, P. Simmons, T. Zollo

 

The meeting was called to order at 4:02 pm.

 

Old Business

CAS Update

M. Lynch reported that at the end of the fall semester, there were two suggestions that SAC made to CAS – consider a later closing time for the Books and Bytes Café in Milne Library and review appropriate service and availability of less expensive Tavern food for students at the Big Tree Inn.  Both points were communicated to Ed Abbott of CAS at the end of the fall semester, but a follow-up conversation will be necessary to confirm the status of each suggestion.

 

During the 2/18 meeting, an additional CAS issue was raised concerning changes in meal plan pricing which now seems to restrict students from eating 2 full meals/day.  There was also some discussion on availability of dining halls during evening/night hours. 

 

SAC has made some progress with CAS.  It is unclear whether the committee will pursue further food service issues this semester.

 

University Police Website Update

Joe Van Remmen from University Police joined the meeting to discuss progress being made with the UP website.  Joe said that there has always been a link on their site for anonymous crime reporting, but asked for ideas on other locations on Geneseo’s web pages where the link might attract more attention and use.  Websites for the Sexual Violence Awareness Committee, Lauderdale Health Center, and the Current Students page were among the suggestions for a more prominent location.  The goal of a UP reporting link is anonymous, clear, and easy access for reporting crimes on campus.  One concern is that it may be difficult to determine if the same crime has been reported multiple times.

 

New Business

Discussion of Possible Agenda Items for Spring 2003

SAC members began talking about issues they would like to concentrate on during the spring semester.  The first topic focused on student safety on campus.  It was agreed that this is a constant problem that cannot be easily resolved in one semester.  J. Sergio pointed out that there are other committees and services on campus to handle this issue and already have plans in place for tackling the problem.  One idea that the SAC discussed was providing better and more available education to students on topics like alcohol, sexual assault, harassment, and other issues related to health and safety.  SAC members would like to see seminars offered to all new students on topics related to health and safety.  Typical freshman seminars only allow for 20 students to register, but there could be multiple sections to allow a greater number of students to participate.  Another idea would include a multitude of workshops offered throughout the year, on the topics discussed above, where incoming freshmen would be required to attend a specific number of classes.  Members of SAC agreed to form a small group to discuss the options available for greater education on health and safety.  They will contact representatives from appropriate departments on campus to attempt to put some of these options into place.

 

The next possible agenda item concerned the proposed tuition hike.  Students would certainly prefer a more gradual raise in tuition on a yearly basis, rather than facing a jump in tuition prices as has been proposed.  Combined with a rise in tuition is a reduction in TAP funds, making it very difficult for students to benefit from an affordable, quality college education.  SAC is interested in exploring advocacy opportunities connected to this issue.

 

There was some discussion on the proposed elimination of Intersession.  Nobody on SAC was opposed to this idea.

 

Proposal on Pledging

J. Remy (student guest) was asked to elaborate on his proposal regarding pledging policies.  The proposal contains three primary points – (1) dry pledging, (2) deferring pledging until second semester, and (3) allowing a maximum six week pledging period – and is intended to cover some student organizations on campus that may not be covered by existing policy.  M. Lynch has been in communication with Dean Sancilio to determine whether or not certain non-IGC organizations are covered under current policies.  Some question still remains if these organizations are indeed covered and J. Remy plans to talk with Dr, Sancilio again (as will M. Lynch) to confirm these details.  Some members of SAC raised concerns about the wide-spread coverage of the proposed resolution and whether or not the rules would also apply to sports organizations or any other non-greek student organization.  J. Remy stated that the goal of his proposal was to protect the health and safety of students in all organizations, as well as the liability of the college.  There was some discussion about the possibility of dividing the proposal into parts.  J. Remy agreed that it might be fruitful to focus initially on the issue of dry pledging, and perhaps tackle points 2 and 3 (deferring pledging until second semester and following a six week pledging period) in a subsequent separate proposal.  SAC will wait for an update at their next scheduled meeting.

 

The meeting was adjourned at 5:05 pm.

 

Respectfully submitted,

 

Michael Lynch, Ph.D.

Chair, SAC

 

Minutes of the Senate Executive Committee Meeting

25 February 2003

Present: T. Bazzett; C. Dahl; G. Drake; C. Freeman; E. Gillin; R. Hartman; J. Lieberman; M. Lynch; J. Lovett; D. Metz; M. Schmidt; J. Zook.

 

Call to Order

Chair Bazzett called the meeting to order at 12.50PM.

 

Approval of Minutes

The Committee approved the minutes of its previous meeting (4 February 2003, Bulletin 12, pp. 103-08) without corrections.

 

Reports

Chair's Report

1. T. Bazzett reported the results of the recent Faculty referendum on the impending war in Iraq: 119 votes in favor and 69 against, from a total of 449 ballots sent out. Lovett pointed out that this was a less than 50% response. Bazzett further noted that voters did not have an opportunity to abstain.

2. The Nominations Committee was behind in the nominations process. Until recently, the Committee had no Chair, but A. Eisenberg (Sociology) would now take charge. Bazzett asked Executive Committee members to seek out colleagues who might have interest (for instance, for Vice-Chair). Faculty were allowed to self-nominate. Bazzett thought this was a particularly difficult time since we were changing term appointments for Committees, such as the Personal Leave Review Committee.

 

President's Report

President Dahl said that he was working hard with State Legislators to maintain funding for the College, to keep from eliminating TAP funds, etc. We would be asking Legislators to keep tax dollar funding if tuition was not increased.  Every reduction of tuition by $100 meant $32 million less for SUNY. At a meeting of Western New York Presidents recently, Dahl got the sense that the TAP proposal would not stick, since it hit lower-income students hardest and eliminated access. Moreover, he noted that TAP was both a public and private college benefit program. Real danger remained for TAP, of course, and we were still adjusting to the $1.5 million we had to cut from our State Operations Budget this year.

 

Dahl called again for a rational tuition policy. In regard to that, Lovett wanted to know whether the upcoming Student Advocacy Day was focused uniquely on rolling back tuition. Was the message coordinated with the President’s message? Lieberman replied that the biggest message at this point was to fight the tuition hike.

 

Dahl also noted that the New York State Budget (as opposed to TAP) puts SUNY into the lowest five of all States in per capita funding and in other measures, according to outside monitors of higher education. Higher education systems in this State should provide a greater vision for higher education and argue for  its value in the culture of the State and its economy.

 

Finally, Dahl reported that the College was working hard on a second capital appropriation to fund the second phase of the new Science Building. We would be making case to local State Senators shortly.

 

Provost's Report

No report.

 

Vice Chair’s Report

C. Freeman was pleased with two opportunities to use electronic voting during the most recent Senate meeting. One Senator had been concerned that there was no easy way to get the vote totals until after the meeting. For this reason, Freeman gave the vote totals to the Senate Secretary to be published in the minutes. Freeman said that there was a way to close the voting session and determine the vote count. While this would take a few mouse clicks, Bazzett thought this would still be easier than dealing with paper ballots.

 

Bazzett asked Freeman if we had given official notice to Excellence Awards nominees. Freeman said the materials were in Albany, said Freeman; Dahl did not think they would be ready till May. Freeman added that each of the nominees have received notification; Dahl said his office could send an interim letter confirming that we have sent the materials to Albany on a certain date. The Executive Committee thought this practice would be a good idea.

 

The Committee also discussed the practice of sending consolation letters to those not receiving further consideration (and when it would be appropriate to send them out.)

 

Past Chair’s Report

J. Lovett reported that the Ad Hoc Committee on Governance met several times. They were gathering materials to study and would consult (through the mail) with the Executive Committee about the process. They would also discuss with the President and the Provost what shared governance means. The Committee wants to avoid foisting a huge amount of governance decisions on the Faculty.

 

Treasurer’s Report

As usual, M. Schmidt was monitoring the listserve and sending flowers out to the bereaved on behalf of the Senate.

 

University Faculty Senator’s Report

No report.

 

Central Council Report

1.  J. Lieberman reported that the Student Association’s Budget Advocacy Day would take place on Thursday, 6 March from 11AM-4PM in the College Union Lobby. Everyone was inverted and welcome to participate.

2.  The Student Association would be taking a delegation of students to the Budget rally in Albany on Tuesday, 11 March.

 

M. Schmidt asked Lieberman how Students understood the Budget issues. Schmidt said there was a core group—Democratic Socialists, HUG, BSU—that understand the complexity of the issues, while the periphery understood the tuition hike.

 

Dahl urged that when students asked for a tuition decrease, they should also ask the legislators to replace tuition dollars with tax dollars. The President pointed out that the community in general was not concerned with a tuition increase; they were seeing their property taxes going up while school aid was decreasing by 10%—and they also knew that tuition had not risen in seven years. Dahl recommended focusing advocacy on TAP restoration and on social justice issues.

 

Committee Reports

Faculty Affairs Committee Report

R. Hartman contacted people on the Committee to remind them of the referendum vote. She has asked for issues to discuss but has received no response so far.

 

Graduate Affairs Committee Report 

D. Metz said that GAAC approved three new proposals from the School of Education; these would appear at Senate. School of Education Director D. Showers has requested skipping the first reading in order to get the new version of the Special Education program implemented within State deadlines. Showers had discussed the matter with Bazzett and with Associate Provost D. Gordon. Bazzett said he had asked Showers whether Senate could not skip the first reading. His explained that one of the School of Education Faculty had submitted a grant hat depended on the program being in place by this summer.  The State would take about two months to approve the program after we did. So if we waited until April to start the process with the State, it would approve the program later than the grant proposal deadline.

 

According to the Constitution, Bazzett observed, curricular items—excluding program changes—could skip the first reading. So where did that leave us? Dahl thought the matter was constitutionally pretty clear. The Committee also aired the concern: the Special Education programs were in the agenda for the last meeting but not in the Bulletin. Showers did say that the Special Education program was the only one we needed to waive, not the Reading and Literacy program.

 

Lovett wanted to know if this would be controversial. Bazzett said that Showers claimed it would not be. Lovett then recalled that when the Assessment Plan program needed to go to Albany with local approval, we actually did the second reading after it left campus with the understanding that approval would likely come at that second reading. So could the School of Education proposal follow this precedent? Bazzett said he would ask. Bazzett said that, ultimately, the Senate was making a recommendation to the President.

 

Dahl thought that the smallest possible exception is the best move. Also, by comparison, the main controversy the School of Education’s Early Childhood Program dealt with excessively large numbers of credit hours that would not leave enough room for electives. But here we were only tinkering with a master’s professional program, not an undergraduate program that included general education issues. 

 

Bazzett admitted that, if it were not for the clause in the Constitution, he would be fine with this issue, but could we make a specific motion? E. Gillin did not believe we had the authority to suspend the Constitution. The Committee decided that we could run this matter through its regular course, with communication between Dennis showers and the President. The President said he would not be comfortable making an exception for a wholly new program, but in this case we were only changing a few components of the existing program mandated by the State. The President might have to make the changes, anyway, because of State mandates.

 

Dahl reminded Bazzett to send him memos of courses adopted on second readings for required Presidential approval. It would be best to do this on a rolling basis rather than all at once.

 

Policy Committee Report

No report.

 

Undergraduate Curriculum Committee Report 

J. Zook said that her Committee had a stack of proposals to present at the next Senate meeting.

 

Student Affairs Committee Report

M. Lynch said that SAC had met last week. This semester they would be working on ideas about student safety and health beyond what Freshman Orientation offered—perhaps through freshman seminars or some other seminar mechanism. The Committee would consul with several other constituencies on campus.

 

Lynch was also concerned about informed advocacy about the proposed tuition hike, and he said that he wanted to discuss this with J. Lieberman.

 

Finally, SAC was dealing with the proposal on pledging activities that might, including a dry pledging policy. Lynch was not sure there really was a policy gap, but the Committee would try to figure this out. J. Zook asked what the current policy was. Lynch said that he understood there was a dry-pledging policy that covered all student organizations; the student submitting the proposal believed that the policy did not cover all of them. Lieberman thought the student wanted to have consistencies with the existing IGC policies; concerns had been raised about how this would be enforced. Lynch said they would try to resolve this thoroughly.

 

Old Business

There was no Old Business.

 

New Business

Chair Bazzett presented a motion forwarded to the Executive Committee from B. Glass, Director of the Teaching Learning Center (TLC):

 

Addition of Standing Committee of the College to Constitution

Article X, Section 4

Teaching /Learning Council

 

 

Bazzett inquired about the procedure for this addition. Lovett said that Standing Committees of the College German not fall under the Senate’s responsibilities. President Dahl explained that it was his function to approve such a proposal. It would then become part of the Constitution, and the President would inform the Executive Committee of the change. Dahl endorsed codifying this proposal into the Constitution.

 

Bazzett asked Lovett to look at the proposal. He and Lovett would also update the Constitution so that the Senate’s website would contain the latest version. In reference to this ongoing need, Dahl lamented loss of archivist/librarian J. Bushnell (who retired in December).

 

Lovett said that we had previously talked about adding the Assessment Committee to the Constitution. In reference to the proposal at hand, however, she wondered whether it should be a Committee elected through Senate as opposed to a strictly appointed body. The TLC was something that affected curriculum issues. This kind of distinction was something that the Ad Hoc Governance Committee had been discussing. Bazzett stressed getting the Committee into the Constitution first. Lovett then reminded the Executive Committee that there were some Committees that belonged in the Constitution.

 

Dahl observed that there were also interesting archival questions that come from additions and changes in technology, such as the introduction of websites.

 

Adjourned at 1.50PM.

 

Respectfully submitted,

 

Graham N Drake

College Senate Secretary

GAAC Minutes

February 18, 2003

 

Members Present:  R. Gifford, J. Kirkwood, C. Klima, D. Metz (Chair), S. Salmon, M. Sutherland.  Guests: E. Balajthy, D. Gordon, D. Showers.

 

D. Metz called the meeting to order at 12:45 pm on Tuesday, February 18, 2003.  E. Balajthy (School of Education) gave a presentation regarding the two proposals under GAAC’s consideration: (1) New major, M.S. in Teaching of Reading and Literacy, Birth Through Grade Six that replaces the M.S. in Education Reading Teacher, and (2) New Major, M.S. in Teaching Reading and Literacy, Grade 5 through Adult that also replaces the M.S. in Education Reading Teacher.  These two new programs are consistent with the new New York State Education requirements for teacher certification.  Following a brief question and answer session, GAAC unanimously approved both new degree programs and the associated course listed below. 

 

S. Salmon and D. Showers requested that consideration be given to dispensing with the first reading of the above new programs and courses.  The rationale for this request was predicated on the time constraints the School of Education is under regarding state approval and program implementation target dates.  D. Metz will discuss the proposal with T. Bazzett and the Executive Committee at their February 25th meeting.

 

New Program Information:
Title: M.S. in Education: Teaching of Reading and Literacy, Birth through Grade 6

New bulletin description:
This master's program is open to applicants who have the initial classroom teaching certificate for teaching either at the Early Childhood or Childhood levels, or both. The program prepares students to teach and administer literacy education efforts, birth through grade 6. Emphasis is placed on knowledge of research methods and findings in the field. Emphasis is also placed on diagnosis and instruction in meeting the needs of diverse learners. Culminating experiences include both planning and implementing an action research project and conducting intensive diagnostic/instructional clinical experiences with Early Childhood and Childhood students who have severe reading/literacy difficulties.

Revised or new typical pattern of courses to fulfill requirements of program :
Curr 510: Foundations of Literacy Education; Curr 511: Materials and Methods in Reading/Literacy; Curr 512: Diagnosis and Assessment in Reading and Literacy: Early Childhood and Childhood; Curr 513: Practicum: Meeting the Needs of Diverse Readers: (student must take two sections, one at the Early Childhood level and the second at the Childhood level); Curr 535: Action Research in Reading and Literacy; Educ 504; 12 hrs. of electives under advisement; final evaluation consisting of a field-centered action research project (see Curr 535: Action Research in Reading and Literacy) and 6 credits of clinical practica (see Curr 513: Practicum: Meeting the Special Needs of Readers: Early Childhood AND Childhood)

 

Rationale for Proposal:
The faculty of the Reading and Literacy Center at State University College at Geneseo are committed to the creation of graduate programs that function to serve four central purposes: knowledge - to guide students in developing a comprehensive understanding of the reading process and of other literacy processes, and of the research upon which our field's understandings of these processes is based; pedagogy - to provide students with the opportunity to study and engage in using a variety of methods, technologies, and materials useful in meeting the literacy needs of diverse children, young people, and adults; personal and professional attributes - to help students develop the personal and professional traits necessary for teachers to work effectively with children in a variety of settings ranging from teamed situations to self-contained classrooms to individualized clinical settings, and to grow as lifelong learners and reflective decision makers; leadership - to establish students as proactive participants in a local, state, national, and worldwide effort to improve reading and literacy--and an appreciation of reading and literacy--as of criticalimportance to the affirmation of the dignity and worth of every human being. Recent educational policy initiatives or changes have also influenced the content of the revised program. Changes in the New York State Regulations for Teacher Education programs have placed more demands on teacher education programs to integrate the New York State Learning Standards into the pedagogical components of their programs and to develop linkages with schools and communities.

   

 

New Program Information:
Title: M.S. in Education: Teacher of Reading and Literacy, Grade 5 to Adult

New bulletin description:
This master's program is open to applicants who have the initial classroom teaching certificate for teaching either at the Middle Childhood or Adolescence levels, or both. The program prepares students to teach and administer literacy education efforts, grades five through twelve, as well as for college developmental reading and adult literacy. Emphasis is placed on knowledge of research methods and findings in the field. Emphasis is also placed on diagnosis and instruction in meeting the needs of diverse learners. Culminating experiences include both planning and implementing an action research project and conducting intensive diagnostic/instructional clinical experiences with Middle Childhood and Adolescent students who have severe reading/literacy difficulties.

Revised or new typical pattern of courses to fulfill requirements of program :
Curr 510: Foundations of Literacy Education; Curr 511: Methods and Materials in Reading and Literacy, Preschool--Grade 6; Curr 522: Diagnosis and Assessment in Reading and Literacy: Middle Childhood and Adolescence; Curr 513: Meeting the Needs of Diverse Readers: (student must take two sections, one at the Middle Childhood level and the second at the Adolescence level); Curr 520: Teaching Reading for Secondary, College, and Adult Students; Curr 535: Action Research in Reading and Literacy; Curr 436: Teaching Young Adult Literature; Curr 440: Content Area Reading/Literacy in the Secondary School; Educ 504; final evaluation consisting of a field-centered action research project (see Curr 535: Action Research in Reading and Literacy) and 6 credits of clinical practica (see Curr 513: Practicum: Meeting the Special Needs of Readers (Middle Childhood AND Adolescence)

Rationale for Proposal:
The faculty of the Reading and Literacy Center at State University College at Geneseo are committed to the creation of graduate programs that function to serve four central purposes: knowledge - to guide students in developing a comprehensive understanding of the reading process and of other literacy processes, and of the research upon which our field's understandings of these processes is based; pedagogy - to provide students with the opportunity to study and engage in using a variety of methods, technologies, and materials useful in meeting the literacy needs of diverse children, young people, and adults; personal and professional attributes - to help students develop the personal and professional traits necessary for teachers to work effectively with children in a variety of settings ranging from teamed situations to self-contained classrooms to individualized clinical settings, and to grow as lifelong learners and reflective decision makers; leadership - to establish students as proactive participants in a local, state, national, and worldwide effort to improve reading and literacy--and an appreciation of reading and literacy--as of critical importance to the affirmation of the dignity and worth of every human being. Recent educational policy initiatives or changes have also influenced the content of the revised program. Changes in the New York State Regulations for Teacher Education programs have placed more demands on teacher education programs to integrate the New York State Learning Standards into the pedagogical components of their programs and to develop linkages with schools and communities.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Course Descriptions:

Old Program

 

 

New Program

 

New Program

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reading Teacher

 

R&L B-6

 

 

R&L 5-A

 

 

 

 

 

 

Educ

510

3

 

Curr

510

3

Curr

510

3

 

 

 

 

Educ

511

3

 

Curr

511

3

Curr

511

3

 

 

 

 

Educ

512

3

 

Curr

512

3

Curr

522

3

 

 

 

 

Educ

513

3

 

Curr

513

6

Curr

513

6

 

 

 

 

Educ

520

3

 

 

 

 

Curr

520

3

 

 

 

 

Educ

535

3

 

Curr

535

3

Curr

535

3

 

 

 

 

Educ

504

3

 

Educ

504

3

Educ

504

3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Curr

436

3

 

 

 

 

Educ

517

3

 

 

 

 

Curr

440

3

 

 

 

 

or SPED

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Educ

501

3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

or

502

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

or

503

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Read Elects

6

 

Electives

 

12

Electives

 

3

 

 

 

 

Other Elect

3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total

 

36

 

 

 

33

 

 

33

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Curr 436

 

Teaching Young Adult Literature

 

 

 

 

 

Required

 

 

Curr 438

Teaching Literature, Birth Through Sixth Grade

 

 

 

 

 

Curr 440

Content Area Reading/Literacy in the Secondary School

Required

 

 

Curr 479

Computers & Technology in Reading/Language Arts: Workshop

 

 

 

Curr 510

Foundations of Literacy Education

 

 

 

Required

 

 

Curr 511

Methods and Materials in Reading/Literacy: Preschool-Gr 6

Required

 

 

Curr 512

Diagnosis and Assessment in Reading and Literacy: EC&C

Required

 

 

Curr 513

Practicum: Meeting the Needs of Diverse Readers: EC,C,MC,A

Required

 

 

Curr 514

Reading and Literacy Learning in a Diverse Society

 

 

 

 

Curr 517

Advanced Clinical Experience in Reading/Literacy

 

 

 

 

Curr 520

Teaching of Reading for Secondary, College, & Adult Students

Required

 

 

Curr 522

Diagnosis and Assessment in Reading and Literacy: MC to A

Required

 

 

Curr 530

Language Arts Methods for the Elementary School

 

 

 

 

Curr 535

Action Research in Reading and Literacy

 

 

 

Required

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

                                 

Revised Courses

Revised Course Description
Course number, Title: Curr 436: Teaching Young Adult Literature

Description (include prerequisites and number of credit hours):
This course is designed to assist teachers in understanding and applying current theory in educational curriculum and in literary criticism to teaching and integrating young adult literature in grades 7-12. It will also provide the opportunity for students to read and evaluate recent adolescent literature from a variety of perspectives, including those relating to literary technique and gender and cultural differences. 3(3-0)

Revised Course Description
Course number, Title: Curr 438: Teaching Literature, Birth Through Sixth Grade
Description (include prerequisites and number of credit hours):
Stresses the importance of literature in all areas of children's (birth through sixth grade) learning and development for both typical and atypical learners. The course is designed to use literature to develop critical reading skills and to foster the appreciation of the contributions of literature to various areas of the curriculum. 3(3-0)

Revised Course Description
Course number, Title: Curr 440: Content Area Reading/Literacy in the Secondary School
Description (include prerequisites and number of credit hours):
The course serves as an introduction to learning from text and study/learning strategies in grades 7-12. The major purpose is to better inform content area teachers about ways to use textbooks, supplementary readings, and writing/speaking/listening more effectively. Special focus is placed on differentiating text-based instruction in content subjects for diverse learners and on the role of the content area teacher in adolescents' reading and literacy development. 3(3-0)

Revised Course Description
Course number, Title: Curr 479: Computers and Technology in Reading/Language Arts: Workshop
Description (include prerequisites and number of credit hours):
Serves as a comprehensive survey of the use of computers and technology for teaching and managing instruction in reading and language arts. The course content includes studies of the history of computer applications in reading, as well as purpose and design of software, use of the Internet, and research on computer applications in education. Emphasis is placed on evaluation and use of software. This course is designed primarily for elementary teachers and reading specialists. 3(3-0
)

 

Revised Course Description
Course number, Title: Curr 510: Foundations of Literacy Education

Description (include prerequisites and number of credit hours):
The purpose of this course is to acquaint teachers with current theory and research in reading and writing instruction. As several large-scale research studies support the position that children can learn to read from a variety of materials and methods, this course is designed to investigate the range of theories, past and present, that have shaped reading and writing pedagogy. Prerequisite: a minimum of 6 credits of undergraduate coursework in reading/literacy education or its equivalent. 3(3-0)

 

Revised Course Description
Course number, Title: Curr 511: Materials and Methods in Reading/Literacy
Description (include prerequisites and number of credit hours):
The course deals with key approaches to the teaching of literacy, with particular attention to methods and materials useful in teaching struggling readers. Emphasis is placed both on contemporary approaches and on those of importance in the history of American literacy instruction. The course will typically provide additional detailed focus on one or two methods or curricula of contemporary interest. Pre- or Co-requisite: Curr 510 (Foundations of Literacy Education). 3(3-0)

 

Revised Course Description
Course number, Title: Curr 512: Diagnosis and Assessment in Reading and Literacy: Early Childhood and Childhood
Description (include prerequisites and number of credit hours):
The course introduces students to principles of diagnosis and assessment in reading, writing, and literacy. Informal and formal assessment instruments are studied and administered. Attention is paid to patterns of reading disability, as well as implications for instruction. The course involves students in case studies at both the emergent literacy level and at the elementary level, in which children's literacy achievement is assessed. Students study how to implement district-wide and school-wide assessment programs. Prerequisites: Curr 5xx: Foundations of Literacy Education, and Curr 5xx: Methods and Materials in Reading and Writing, Preschool-Grade 6. Pre- or co-requisite: Educ 504. 3(3-0)

 

Revised Course Description
Course number, Title: Curr 517: Advanced Clinical Experience in Reading/Literacy
Description (include prerequisites and number of credit hours):
This course is designed to provide opportunities to develop proficiency in investigating the nature and cause of severe reading difficulties. A key element in the process will be an intensive experience in administering and interpreting a variety of assessment instruments in conjunction with the diagnostic evaluation of a reader with severe difficulties. Students will explore alternatives for remediation in a clinical setting. Prerequisite: Curr 513: (Practicum: Meeting the Needs of Diverse Readers) or permission of instructor. 3(2-2)

 

Revised Course Description
Course number, Title: Curr 520: Teaching of Reading for Secondary, College and Adult Students
Description (include prerequisites and number of credit hours):
For reading specialists and other teachers who are concerned with the reading/literacy problems of older students, as well as with the current sociocultural factors that have an impact on their educational lives. Primary focus is on the secondary school developmental and remedial reading programs. Attention is also given to the needs of at-risk college students and to adult literacy development. Prerequisite: Curr 510 (Foundations of Literacy Education). 3(3-0)

 

Revised Course Description
Course number, Title: Educ 522: Diagnosis and Assessment in Reading and Literacy: Middle Childhood and Adolescence
Description (include prerequisites and number of credit hours):
Students will investigate the nature and causes of reading and literacy difficulty in middle childhood and adolescence. Various formal and informal instruments designed for use with these age groups will be used to identify difficulties, interpret results, and plan remediation. Particular attention will be paid to policies of state and federal testing. Focused attention will be placed on specialized assessment formats. Prerequisite: Curr 520: Teaching Reading for Secondary, College and Adult Students. Pre- or co-requisite: Educ 504. 3(3-0)

 

Revised Course Description
Course number, Title: Curr 530: Language Arts Methods for the Elementary School
Description (include prerequisites and number of credit hours):
This course focuses on principles of developmentally appropriate instruction derived from research related to the language arts. Writing process approaches and children's literature are used to show how reading, writing, speaking and listening can be meaningfully integrated into the classroom curriculum. 3(3-0)

 

Revised Course Description
Course number, Title: Curr 535: Action Research in Reading and Literacy
Description (include prerequisites and number of credit hours):
This course is designed to help students synthesize information learned from other reading/literacy course work, generalize about issues in reading, critically analyze information heard and read, make judgments about the efficacy of policies and procedures in reading, and initiate change in reading instruction. The course is centered around the implementation and reporting of a significant action research project. Prerequisites: Curr 511 (Methods and Materials in Reading and Literacy, Preschool-Grade 6; Educ 504. 3(3-0)

 

New Courses

 

New Course Description
Course number, Title: Curr 513: Practicum: Meeting the Needs of Diverse Readers: (Early Childhood OR Childhood OR Middle Childhood OR Adolescent)
Description (include prerequisites and number of credit hours):
The course provides students a clinical, tutorial experience in assessment and instruction with a child who has a reading difficulty. Students will find this course a culminating experience for their graduate program, in which they bring together their studie in literacy theories and methods to examine one child in depth and to participate in discussions and decision-making about the other children in the clinic. This course may be repeated at different levels. Pre- or co-requisite for Early Childhood and Childhood sections: Curr 512 (Diagnosis and Assessment in Reading and Literacy: Early Childhood and Childhood). Pre- or co-requisite for Middle Childhood and Adolescence sections: Curr 522 (Diagnosis and Assessment in Reading and Literacy: Middle Childhood and Adolescence). 3(3-0)

 

New Course Description
Course number, Title: Curr 514: Reading and Literacy Learning in a Diverse Society
Description (include prerequisites and number of credit hours):
The course focuses on issues of concern to reading and literacy teachers in our increasingly multicultural society. Emphasis is placed upon research--both quantitative and qualitative--that has examined the characteristics and needs of children from diverse social, cultural and language backgrounds. Major perspectives offered in the course critically examine pedagogies that are particularly designed for such diverse students, including critical pedagogies and multiple literacies perspectives. 3(3-0)