College Senate Bulletin

Bulletin No. 18
May 20th, 2003

Contents
 

Announcements:                      
Spring Election Results
End of the Year Thanks
Minutes Student Affairs Committee - 15 April, 2003
Committee Summaries 2002-2003
       
Graduate Academic Affairs
Vice-Chair
Policy Committee
Faculty Affairs Committee
Curriculum Committee
Student Affairs Committee

 


Correspondence:  Terence Bazzett, Department of Psychology,

Sturges 34; e-mail: bazzett@geneseo.edu; phone: (245)-5248

 

Announcements:

Spring Election Results

Results of the Spring elections are as follows:

General Education Committee - Fine Arts: Amy Stanley

General Education Committee - Humanities: William Gohlman

General Education Committee - Social Sciences: Ken Kallio

Professional Leave Review Committee - Educ/Comm Dis: Linda House

Professional Leave Review Committee - Fine Arts: Carl Shanahan

Professional Leave Review Committee - Professional Studies: Avan Jassawalla

 

End of the Year Thanks from the Chair

I have tried to make it a point to personally thank people throughout the year for their efforts, advice, encouragement, etc.  A few individuals who I would like to thank publicly include Casey Bickle for her endless administrative efforts in keeping the Senate running smoothly behind the scenes.  Maryann Stopha also deserves many thanks for her patience in helping the Senate develop what should be an effective electronic voting system that will run with ease and independence for future Senate leaders.  Special thanks also, to those who served on the Executive Committee this past year.  Working closely with this committee, I have newfound respect for several members, and continued respect for the rest.

 

Minutes

Minutes of Student Affairs Committee

April 15, 2003

Committee Members  Present: M. Lynch, C. Rowley, M. Fratto, B. Nash, M. Esch, K. Davies, C. Tang, W. Freed, C. Annala, J. Tang, J. Principe, J. Sergio, L. Zoller

Committee Members Absent:  R. Holthaus, D. McPherson, P. Simmons, T. Zollo

 

The meeting was called to order at 4:00 pm.

Old Business

Pledging Proposal:

C. Tang proposed that other aspects of pledging that negatively effect student's academic work should be considered in addition to the use of alcohol.   After some discussion it was agreed that SAC may want to continue to monitor this issue.  M. Lynch will draft a letter to Tom Rodgers, Director of Campus Activities, requesting that all student organizations be reminded at the beginning of each academic year about college-wide policies concerning the use of alcohol and hazing. 

 

Budget advocacy:

J. Sergio reported that SAC could access a listserv of Geneseo alumni.  This listserv could be used to promote a letter writing campaign.  J. Sergio volunteered to draft 2 letters, one aimed to the NYC region (CUNY) and another targeted to the remainder of the state.  Drafts will be forwarded to remainder of SAC for evaluation with the goals of sending the letters out before the end of the semester.

 

Student Health and Safety:

M. Lynch reported that 10 people participated in a brainstorming meeting that took place April 15.  The group -- consisting of members of SAC, SHAC, SVAC, as well as personnel from the admissions office and orientation office -- discussed specific issues related to health and safety that need to be addressed, what strategies could be used for meeting these identified needs, how these strategies could be implemented in order to promote continuity with current health and safety activities, and how a maximum number of students could be impacted.  A tentative plan was made to develop a proposal for a first year seminar.  M. Lynch expressed concern about a loss of momentum for this initiative due to the fact that we are nearing the end of the semester.

 

 

 

 

Students with disabilities:

J. Tang reported that she spoke to Becky Glass from the Learning Center who expressed interest in setting up a seminar/workshop.  B.Glass agreed to speak to David Gordon about making the seminar/workshop available to new faculty.  It was agreed that SAC continue to discuss this issue next semester.

 

CAS Update:

M. Lynch reported that CAS got back to him.  After reviewing the results of the survey taken last semester, the three areas that CAS will concentrate on next year are menu variety, pricing and food quality.  The Tavern will continue to be available only to customers over 21. This is a liability and a service issue. Customers under 21 can order the lunch menu in the dining rooms during the lunch period. The lunch menu is very similar to the tavern menu.  In order to keep the Big Tree fine dining (which is part of CAS's mission there) they will not be able to offer the tavern menu in the dining rooms.  CAS is looking into keeping Books and Bytes open later for next year, and they will run extended hours for finals this year to help students study.

 

Student Printing Accounts:

K. Davies explained that students from particular majors and classes seem to be required to print more than other students in order to complete their written assignments, and as a result they must incur additional printing costs.  K. Davies will draft a letter to Sue Chichester regarding possible adjustments in the printing allotment for some students.

 

New Business

Intercession:

Positive and negative repercussions connected to the ending of intercession were discussed.

 

The meeting was adjourned at 5:10 pm.

 

Respectfully submitted,

Michael Lynch, Ph.D.

Chair, SAC

 

Year End Summaries from Committee Chairs

 

Graduate Academic Affairs

Summary if 2002-2003 Actions

 

GAAC unanimously approved the following new and revised courses and new and revised programs.  All course and program changes were subsequently approved by the Senate.

 

New Course (summaries in bulletin 3)

                CDSC 436: Communicative Disorders Research            

New Course (summaries in bulletin 7)

New Course ACCT 502: Advanced Financial Accounting (p. 70)

New Course ACCT 503: Strategic Management Accounting (p. 70)

New Course ACCT 520: Advanced Auditing Theory (p. 71)

New Course ACCT 530: Accounting Theory and Research (p. 71)

New Course ECON 525: Managerial Economic Analysis (p. 71)

New Course MGMT 500: Leadership in Organizations (p. 71)

New Course MGMT 511: Financial Management (p. 71)

New Course MGMT 522: Quantitative Analysis (p. 71)

New Course MGMT 550: Information Systems Theory and Practice  (p. 71)

New Course ENGL 406/306 Writing for Teachers (p. 72)

New Program

MS in Accounting (p. 70)

Course Revisions

Course Revision: CDSc 541  Adult Language Disorders (p. 72)

Course Revision: CDSc 522  Neurogenic Speech Disorders (p. 72)

Course Revision: CDSc 445 Language Intervention w/ Persons w/ Severe Impairment (p. 72)

  Program Revision

Program Revision: Communicative Disorders and Sciences Program (p. 72)

Course Revisions/Modifications  (summaries in bulletins 12 & 13)

SPED 503: Special Education: Foundation and Legal Issues  (p. 115)

SPED 504: Assessment and Program Evaluation (p. 116)

EDUC 504: Educational Research Methodology (p. 116)

SPED 505: Transition in Educational and Community Settings (p. 116)

SPED 506: Applied Behavior Analysis (p. 116)

SPED 507: Seminar in Special Education (p. 116)

SPED 515: Emotional Disturbance/Behavioral Disorders: Characteristics (p. 116)

SPED 516: Emotional Disturbance/Behavioral Disorders: Interventions (p. 116)

SPED 525: Academic Strategies (p. 117)

SPED 541 Learning Disabilities: Characteristics (p. 117)

SPED 542: Learning Disabilities: Interventions (p. 117)

 New Courses

SPED 525: Academic Strategies (p. 117)

                SPED 590: Master’s Project: Design and Implementation (p. 117)

                SPED591: Master’s Project: Dissemination (p. 117)

Program Revision

Revised M.S. in Education: Special Education program (p. 115)

  Revised Course Descriptions

Curr 436: Teaching Young Adult Literature (p.129)

Curr 438: Teaching Literature, Birth Through Sixth Grade (p.130)

Curr 440: Content Area Reading/Literacy in the Secondary School (p.130)

Curr 479: Computers and Technology in Reading/Language Arts: Workshop (p.130)

Curr 510: Foundations of Literacy Education (p.130)

Curr 511: Materials and Methods in Reading/Literacy (p.130)

Curr 512: Diagnosis and Assess in Reading and Literacy: Early Child and Child (p.130)

Curr 517: Advanced Clinical Experience in Reading/Literacy (p.131)

Curr 520: Teaching of Reading for Secondary, College and Adult Students (p.131)

Educ 522: Diagnosis and Assess. in Reading and Literacy: Middle Child and Adolesc (p.131)

Curr 530: Language Arts Methods for the Elementary School (p.131)

Curr 535: Action Research in Reading and Literacy (p.131)

 New Courses

Curr 513: Practicum: Meeting the Needs of Diverse Readers: (Early Childhood OR Childhood

  OR Middle Childhood OR Adolescent) (p.131)

Curr 514: Reading and Literacy Learning in a Diverse Society (p.132)

 New Program

                M.S. in Education: Teaching of Reading and Literacy, Birth through Grade 6 (p.127)

 Revised Course Descriptions

                CURR 436: Teaching Young Adult Literature (p. 129)

                CURR 438: Teaching Literature, Birth Through Sixth Grade (p. 130)

                CURR 440: Content Area Reading/Literacy in the Secondary School (p. 130)

                CURR 479: Computers and Technology in Reading/Language Arts: Workshop (p. 130)

                CURR 510: Foundations of Literacy Education (p. 130)

                CURR 512: Diagnosis and Assessment in Reading and Literacy: Early Child and Child (p. 130)

                CURR 517: Advanced Clinical Experience in Reading/Literacy (p. 131)

                CURR 520: Teaching of Reading for Secondary, College and Adult Students (p. 131)

                EDUC 522: Diagnosis and Assessment in Reading and Literacy: Middle Child &Adolesc (p. 131)

                CURR 530: Language Arts Methods for the Elementary School (p. 131)

                CURR 535: Action Research in Reading and Literacy (p. 131)

New Courses

                CURR 513: Practicum: Meeting the Needs of Diverse Readers: (Early Childhood OR Childhood          OR Middle Childhood OR Adolescent) (p. 131)

                CURR 514: Reading and Literacy Learning in a Diverse Society (p. 132)

New Program : M.S. in Education: Teacher of Reading and Literacy, Grade 5 to Adult (p. 128)

 

Vice-Chair

Annual Report from the 2002-2003:

Sincere thanks to all of the members of the 2002-2003 Excellence Committee for their dedication and their hard work in the review process. There were many highly qualified nominees for the Chancellor's Excellence Awards this year, and it was frustrating that the Excellence Committee was not allowed to extend awards to all of the deserving nominees. The winners for this year will be announced soon, when the process is complete.

 

Respectfully submitted,

Charlie Freeman

Policy Committee

2002-2003 Annual Report

It was a relatively quiet year for this committee.  Two significant items were brought to the committee’s attention, discussed, and forwarded to the Academic Senate for full consideration:

1.                    A proposal to revise academic policy governing the appeal and review of grades.  The revision attempted to clarify this policy, particularly by providing more specific language describing legitimate grounds for appealing course grades and by highlighting the course instructor’s ultimate authority for assigning grades.  [This revision is printed on pages 145-146 of Bulletin # 14.]

2.                    A proposal to revise School of Education requirements for admission and student teaching.  These changes were advocated by SOE to enhance the quality of teacher education candidates, to better align the program’s criteria with that of peer programs, and to limit enrollments in education programs that have outgrown current resources.  [The changed requirements are described on pages 146-147 of Bulletin #14.]

These proposals were approved by the College Senate in first and second readings at the meetings of April 8 and May 6.

 

Respectfully submitted,

Edward Gillin - Chair, Committee on Undergraduate Policy, Core, and Review

 

Faculty Affairs Committee

Annual Report, 2002-2003

The Faculty Affairs Committee discussed three issues during the academic year:

1.                    Faculty responsibility for students with disabilities. Specific issues were concerned with time allotment, space allocation for exams and the extra time demands placed on faculty. Tabitha Buggie-Hunt provided information, suggestions and solutions to faculty concerns (pgs. 52, 93 & 147 of the Bulletin).

2.                    Intersession. Provost Dixon provided members of FAC with the history of intersession, feedback from discussions about intersession and possible calendar changes for the academic year 2003-2004 (pgs. 147-148 of the Bulletin).

3.                    Registration issues and student attendance. R. Hartman provided FAC members with information from Dean Bailey concerning registration time changes for the spring semester registration process. It was noted the time changes were not a final version of the process and the Dean’s Office would like feedback from faculty and students about the timing of the registration process. (pg. 147 of the Bulletin).

R. Hartman would like to thank members of FAC for their time and effort during the academic year.

 

Respectfully submitted,

Rosanne Hartman, Chairperson FAC

 

Undergraduate Curriculum Committee

Annual Report of the 2002-2003

During the fall semester, the committee met 3 times and considered proposals for 8 new courses, 7 course revisions, and 8 program revisions.  The committee approved all proposals it considered and all were passed by the full senate.  Judy Bushnell stepped down as chair of UCC at the end of the fall semester when she announced her retirement.  The committee thanks Judy for her hard work and for doing a terrific job.

UCC met three times during the spring semester and considered proposals for 14 new courses, 31 course revisions, 4 course deletions, and 7 program revisions.  The committee approved all proposals and all were passed by the full senate. 

I thank the committee members for all their work during a busy year.  Special thanks to Ed Spicka and Julie King-Waite in the Dean’s office for their help in getting me on my feet after I took over as chair during the spring semester.

Respectfully submitted,

Joan Zook, Chair

2002-2003 Proposals Considered and Passed by U.C.C.

Course Revisions

Comn 368, 363

Engl 222

Math 213

Chem 340, 351

Psyc 380

Thea 260, 225, 320, 333, 342, 344, 346, 311, 330, 340

Educ 215

Eced 333, 331

Anth 202, 207, 211, 215, 229, 310, 321, 323

CDSC 100, 200, 300, 238, 240

CSCI 241, 242

Biol 306

Plsc 228

Dance 240

 

New Courses

Bchm 393

Biol 128, 302, 202, 264, 305

Engl 406/306, 318, 242, 332

Chem 100, 352

CDSC 243, 244, 201

Anth 396, 325

Mgmt 268

Geog 365

Math 228, 380

 

Course Deletions

CDSC 202, 368

Mgmt 261

Socl 285

 

 

 

Program Revisions

Asian Study Minor

Computer Science Major

B.A. in Chemistry

B.S. in Chemistry: American Chemical Society Certified

B.S. in Chemistry: American Chem. Soc. Certified; Biochem Option

B.S. Adolescence Certification (7-12) in Chemistry & General Science

B.A. in Biology and B.S. in Biology

Honors Program in Studio Art

Sociology concentration

Black Studies major

Africana Studies minor

History concentration

International Relations major

Business Administration major

Biology major

 

Student Affairs Committee

Summary Report for 2002-2003

During the past year, SAC focused its attention on the following four issues:

 

CAS

At the start of the year, students expressed concerns about a number of issues related to CAS.  The two primary concerns focussed on availability of services over the weekend and pricing.  SAC engaged Director of CAS, Ed Abbott, was initially very responsive to SAC requests and concerns.  As a result dining halls opened on Friday and Saturday nights, and CAS agreed to take on the additional cost incurred ($1.50 per student) to extend hours.  CAS conducted a survey regarding student and faculty satisfaction with campus dining services. After reviewing the results of the survey taken in the Fall, the three areas that CAS will concentrate on next year are menu variety, pricing and food quality.  At the end of the fall semester, there were two additional issues that were raised by SAC: (1) a later closing time for the Books and Bytes Café in Milne Library and (2) appropriate service and availability of cheaper food options at the Big Tree Inn. CAS informed SAC that the Tavern will continue to be available only to customers over 21. This is a liability and a service issue. Customers under 21 can order the lunch menu in the dining rooms during the lunch period.  In order to keep the Big Tree fine dining (which is part of CAS's mission there) they will not be able to offer the tavern menu in the dining rooms.  CAS is looking into keeping Books and Bytes open later for next year, and they will run extended hours for finals this year to help students study.

 

Student health and safety

SAC has had on-going interest in student health and safety.  In recent years, it has engaged in discussions about issues such as sexual assault and the use of alcohol by students.  These kinds of issues cannot be easily resolved in one semester.  There are a number of committees and services on campus already that have been attempting to tackle issues of related to health and safety.  One idea that the SAC discussed was providing extended education to students on topics related to health and safety.  SAC convened a brainstorming meeting that took place April 15 and included members of SAC, SHAC, SVAC, as well as personnel from the admissions office and orientation office.  The group discussed specific issues related to health and safety that needed to be addressed, strategies that could be used for meeting these identified needs, how these strategies could be implemented in order to promote continuity with current health and safety activities, and how a maximum number of students could be impacted.  A tentative plan was made to develop a proposal for a first year seminar. 

 

SUNY budget advocacy

SAC discussed opportunities on and around campus for students to get involved in budget advocacy activities.  The idea of getting alumni and people who have donated money to the college was also discussed.  A student member of SAC facilitated a letter being sent electronically to Geneseo alumni via a listserv set up for registered alumni.

 

Pledging and initiation activities for student organizations

A student presented for consideration by SAC regarding pledging activities by student organizations.  The proposal focussed on three issues: (1) the use of alcohol in pledging and initiation activities; (2) deferring pledging until the second semester of the academic year; and (3) limiting the pledging or orientation process to a maximum 6 (six) weeks.  Concerns were raised as to the wide-spread coverage of the proposed resolution and whether or not the rules would also apply to sports organizations or any other non-greek student organization.  Although there are occasional concerns about the pledging and initiation activities of some groups, there are relevant college policies in place pertaining to things like hazing and the use of alcohol by members of the college community.  There was discussion about whether or not policy is being enforced on a consistent basis.  Unauthorized use of alcohol seemed to be the primary concern behind the proposal.  College sponsored events have to be alcohol free. There are consequences for student groups that do not follow policy.  Rather than create new policy targeting a handful of student organizations, perhaps it would be better at the beginning of each semester to remind all student organizations that pledging and initiation activities are to be alcohol-free.  It was suggested that SAC send a letter to Tom Rodgers (Director of Campus Activities) asking him to contact all student organizations at the start of the year and remind them about college-wide policies concerning the use of alcohol and hazing.

 

Respectfully submitted,

Michael Lynch, Ph.D.

Chair, SAC