College Senate Bulletin

Bulletin No. 6
November 4th 2002

Contents

Agenda: 2002-2003 College Senate Meeting, 12 November 2002
Announcements:                      
Fall Senate Meeting Listing
Fall elections
Minutes of the Undergraduate Curriculum Committee, 22 October 2002
Minutes of Faculty Affairs Committee, 22 Oct 2002                 

Minutes of the Executive Committee, 29 October 2002
Minutes of the Undergraduate Curriculum Committee, 29 October 2002
UCC Proposal Summaries

 

                          

Correspondence:  Terence Bazzett, Department of Psychology,

Sturges 34; e-mail: bazzett@geneseo.edu; phone: (245)-5248

 

College Senate Meeting Agenda

November 12th, 2002

Call to Order

Adoption of the Agenda

Approval of the Minutes of the Previous Meetings

pp. 43-45, Senate Bulletin #5

Senate Reports

President                    Christopher Dahl

Provost                       Barbara Dixon

Chair                           Terence Bazzett           

Vice Chair                  Charles Freeman

Treasurer                   Maryellen Schmidt

University Senator     William Gohlman

Central Council          Joshua Lieberman

 

Reports of the Standing Committees of the Senate

Undergraduate Curricula                   Judith Bushnell

Second Reading: (summaries in bulletin 4)

     Revision of a Minor Program

Asian Study Minor - Add ANTH 301 to possible electives (p.32)

      Course Revision

                COMN368 (p.32)

                ENGL222 (p.32)

                MATH213 (p.32)

First Reading: (summaries in this bulletin)

    Revision of a Major Program

Program revision - B.A. in Computer Science (p.56)

Program revision - B.A. in Biology and B.S. in Biology (p.56)

Program Revision: B.A. in Chemistry (p. 58)

Program Revision: B.S. in Chemistry: American Chemical Society Certified (p. 58)

Program Revision: B.S. in Chemistry: American Chem. Soc. Certified; Biochem Option (p. 59)

Program Revision: B.S. Adolescence Certification (7-12) in Chemistry & General Science (p. 59)

    New Course

New course: BCHM 393 (p.56)

New course: BIOL 128 (p.57)

New course: BIOL 302 (p. 57)

New course: ENGL 406/306 (p. 57)

New Course: ENGL 318 (p. 57)

New Course: CHEM 100 (p. 57)

New Course: CHEM 352 (p. 57)

     Course Revision

Course Revision: CHEM340 (p. 58)

Course Revision: CHEM 351 (p. 58)

Undergraduate Policies                     Edward Gillin

Graduate Academic Affairs   Dale Metz

Student Affairs                                   Michael Lynch

Faculty Affairs                                   Rosanne Hartman

 

Old Business

New Business

Adjournment

Announcements:

Fall 2002 College Senate Meeting Schedule:
November 12
December 3

Fall Elections:

Fall elections will be conducted electronically using e-mail and a voting link set up by CIT.  A list of candidates for the College Personnel Committee and for the Committee on Nominations will be sent to each member of the teaching faculty.  Included with those lists will be instructions for voting.  The election web site will close at 4 P.M. on November 22nd.  Thank you Maryann Stopha for the terrific job putting this site together. 

Minutes:

Minutes of the Undergraduate Curriculum Committee

October 22, 2002

 

The meeting was called to order at 4:00 in Sturges 114.

Members attending: Judy Bushnell, Gary Towsley,  Kathleen O’Neill, Pei Lin Wong, Joseph Cope, Barbara Welker, Amy Stanley, Darrell Norris, Teresa Zollo, Rose McEwan, Joan Zook

Visitors:  Ed Spicka, Ming-Mei Chang, Harold Hoops, Celia Easton

 

Minutes of meeting #1 were approved as printed.

 

1. Revision of the Major: B.A. Computer Science

      Passed unanimously.

2. Revision of the Majors: B.A. and B.S. in Biology

A question was raised as to the adequacy of the rationale offered for the change. The change was to allow either BIOL 302 or BIOL 322  but not both to count as electives in the majors. 

It was moved and seconded to vote to approve the revision with the stipulation that an amended rationale be attached.  Carried.

   Main motion passed unanimously.

3. New Course BCHM 393

   Passed unanimously.

4. New Course BIOL 128

 The word “potential “ in “potential resources” was found to be unnecessary. It was moved and seconded to strike it from the description of the course. This motion passed.

A discussion ensued on the clientele for the course. Could it be taken by non-freshmen? It was moved and seconded that the following be added to the description:

“This course is designed for freshmen. Other students may be able to enroll if space permits.” This motion passed.

The main motion passed unanimously.

5. New Course BIOL 302

 Passed unanimously.

6. New Course ENGL 306/406

 It was asked if it made sense for a student to take a high level course like this one without English 200. The response was that English 200 is not a basic skills course that this course would build upon. All students will have taken INTD 105 which should be an adequate preparation. Also, theoretically a student could take ENGL 306 nas an undergraduate and then take ENGL 406 as a graduate student.

The motion to accept this course passed unanimously.

 

UCC will meet again next week.

Repectfully submitted by Gary Towsley

 

Minutes of the Faculty Affairs Committee

22 October, 2002

 

Present: J. Bearden, T. Book, J. Colosi, W. Cook, B. Glass, K. Hannam, R. Hartman, A. Herman, K. Mapes, E. Savellos, A. Weibel, C. Whalen, C. Woidat, R. Young

 

Meeting was called to order at 4:00 p.m.

 

Old Business:

Task Force on Faculty Roles and Rewards

 

R. Hartman provided the draft of the charge to “The Task Force on Faculty Roles and Reward” in response to questions raised about the Task Force and its charge.  Members of FAC questioned if the Chairperson of the Task Force would discuss progress of the Task Force with members of FAC.  Hartman stated at this point the Task Force is still identifying and discussing issues. Her understanding is the Task Force will report to President Dahl and the College Senate.

 

New Business:

1.                    Faculty responsibility for students with disabilities.

            Guest: Tabitha Buggie-Hunt

Tabitha Buggie-Hunt informed the committee of student and faculty responsibilities. Questions, examples and discussion continued concerning:

a.                    Space allocation for exams: Members suggested a dedicated space on campus for students taking exams outside of class. There is a problem with finding a quiet place for students to take the exams.

b.                   Time allotment for exams: How is the extra time configured?

c.                    Extra time demands placed on faculty when accommodating students taking exams with extended time.

d.                    Might a person from The Office of Disability Services serve as a proctor/scribe for students taking exams outside of class.

Buggie-Hunt said she would try to find rooms on campus where students would be able to take exams. She discussed the difficulty of having someone in the Disabilities office proctor exams, i.e., lack of staff, inability to answer questions about the exam. Tabitha will follow up with concerns of the Committee and the Chairperson will inform the members of the committee of her findings.

 

All members were given a new brochure from the Office of Disability Services.

 

2.             Meetings will be held on an “as needed” basis.

 

Meeting adjourned at 5:15p.m.

 

Respectfully submitted,

Terry Book

Member, FAC

 

Executive Committee Meeting

President’s Conference Room, Erwin

29 October  2002

 

Present: T. Bazzett, J. Bushnell, B. Dixon, G. Drake, E. Gillin, W. Gohlman, R. Hartman, J. Lieberman, M. Lynch, D. Metz, M. Schmidt.

 

Chair Bazzett called the meeting to order at  2.54PM

 

Approval of Minutes

 

The minutes of the previous meeting (3 October 2002, Bulletin 5, pp. 38-42) were approved unanimously without corrections.

 

Reports

Chair's Report

1. T. Bazzett said there would be electronic elections for the fall and spring. He had printed out all off the user names and passwords and would send these off to faculty soon. Since the new offices would begin on 1 December, Bazzett hoped to start elections by 15 November and end by 4PM on 22 November.

 

2. The University Senate’s Plenary Meeting met at SUNY Purchase recently. Bazzett reported a lot of work and great hosting from Purchase. He said Geneseo would host the Plenary Meeting in January. Bazzett referred the Executive Committee to the lengthy report on the meeting in the Bulletin. SUNY’s budget was the main concern; the outlook was very dim. Trustee Randy Daniels spoke to the University Senate, and Bazzett got the impression that the Board of Trustees was becoming a better advocate for SUNY. SUNY was doing well, but the State’s finances were abysmal.

 

Another important topic at the University Senate was the Provost’s Advisory Committee on General Education (PACGE), a group selected by the SUNY Provost to review General Education decisions. Many Faculty had opposed the fact that the SUNY Provost had selected his own watchdog committee.

 

Geneseo’s Provost, Barbara Dixon said that every year Faculty and Campus Governance had pressed the SUNY Provost to get rid of PACGE, and Bazzett said this was (apparently) going to happen. The SUNY Provost’s new Advisory Committee on General Education (ACGE) would be composed of a majority of active faculty members.  He also noted that it was the impression of the SUNY administration that "99%" of new curriculum proposals would not be controversial and thus would not have to go through ACGE.

 

Dixon said for that 99% to be a reality, Chief academic officers had been told each campus would have to pass a resolution to adopt SUNY guidelines for learning outcomes as their own—we could have more, but we had to accept SUNY’s minimum. If campuses did that, then most curriculum proposals would go straight through.

 

Bazzett said that one University Senator had asked for criteria for a “red flag” on a general education proposal at the SUNY Provost’s office and was told there are no criteria.

 

Dixon did note one criteria example of not meeting the guidelines for stated learning outcomes. For instance an anatomy course had once been proposed stating a learning outcome of  "a knowledge of scientific inquiry and method".  However, the syllabus suggested the course required only content knowledge without an understanding of science method, and so could not be approved under these guidelines.

 

Bazzett noted finally that Geneseo had a very good reputation in SUNY. Professors want to get their kids to come here, and people admire Geneseo’s academic quality and beautiful location.

 

President's Report

No report.

 

Provost's Report

  1. Provost Dixon said that Geneseo’s Assessment Plan for General Education had been approved without difficulty. In fact, SUNY Purchase would be using our Plan as a model. Some other campuses had had their plans rejected outright. So Dixon thought our Faculty had done a great job of taking ownership of this project, providing the least amount of obtrusiveness with maximum benefit.
  2. The Task Force on Faculty Roles, Rewards, and Evaluation was continuing its work. On Friday, Leo Lambert, President of Elon College and an expert on Faculty Roles and Rewards, would meet with the Committee and some selected others for lunch. The Chancellor would also be here on Saturday.

 

Vice Chair’s Report.

C. Freeman had sent word that the Excellence Committee had been assembled.

 

Past Chair ‘s Report

No report.

 

Treasurer’s Report

M. Schmidt said that the problem with unwanted mail on the Faculty listserve seemed to have disappeared. She had sent a question about the matter to CIT’s Help Desk, and this seemed to have done the trick. Bazzett said that he would speak with CIT about helping individuals who had the same spamming problem.

 

University Faculty Senator’s Report

W. Gohlman had a cluster of emergencies at the last minute that kept him from attending the University Senate. But he remembered how other Senators found it hard to get things done with their own administrators compared to here.

 

Bazzett added that, in a recent survey of campus governance in SUNY, Geneseo scored very high on cooperation between campus governance and administration. Some other campuses also did not receive release time, secretarial help, or even a budget.

 

Central Council Report

  1. J. Lieberman reported that the annual Intercultural Night Dinner was held this past Saturday. Lieberman called it a great success; all the tables in the CU Ballroom were full.
  2. Elections were being held for freshman class officers and a student representative for the College Council.
  3. This semester’s State Student Assembly was held in Albany recently. The Assembly passed a resolution that would add a 25-cent fee for every SUNY student giving the State Assembly an operating budget of $260,000. Some student representatives, including those from Geneseo, spoke against the resolution since no one provided a budget detailing how the money would be spent.

 

Committee Reports

Faculty Affairs Committee

R. Hartman had met last Tuesday with T. Buggie-Hunt, Geneseo’s Director of Disability Services. They discussed how to allocate space for students to take exams, as well as scheduling times for Faculty to be present for accommodated exams. Hartman and Buggie-Hunt are trying to find appropriate spaces on campus.

 

Provost Dixon said that S. Spring was the main resource person for allocating space on campus; Associate Provost Padalino might be able to help, too.

 

Graduate Affairs Committee Report

D. Metz said that in the last two days his Committee had received a proposal for the new Masters Degree in Accounting and modest changes to the program in Communicative Disorders and Sciences. Bazzett asked if there would be a first reading this semester. Metz said there would be nothing before the December meeting. Bazzett also wanted to know if the Masters in Accounting proposal was extensive? Metz confirmed it was.

 

Dixon asked if the Dean’s Office had seen the proposals and signed off on them. Metz said the Dean’s Office had.  Then the Provost asked if one of her own staff had seen it yet; Metz replied that D. Gordon had. Dixon noted that  occasionally a program change came through claiming no resource implication, and it could look that way on the surface. But on closer scrutiny, course rotation needs would suggest otherwise.

 

Policy Committee Report

No report.

 

Undergraduate Curriculum Committee

Bushnell said her Committee had met last Tuesday and would hold a meeting today. UCC would present first readings in Biology, Chemistry, Computer Science, etc., soon.

 

Student Affairs Committee

M. Lynch’s Committee met last week. The Committee first focused on meal plan issues. Students were concerned about the convenience of the new meal plan. The dining halls were not open for dinner on Friday and Saturday nights. The Committee will speak with CAS about revising service hours.

 

Old Business

Governance Committee

Bazzett asked J. Lieberman if he had sent in names of student members for the Governance Committee. Lieberman said he had. The Provost added that she had two names to send in.

 

University Senate Meeting Discussion

M. Lynch inquired further about SUNY Budget discussion at the University senate Meeting. Had they discussed whether Faculty lines would be affected? Bazzett replied that no one had suggested cuts. There was a hold on filling lines, and even that hadn’t been too bad.

 

Provost Dixon reminded the Executive Committee that the SUNY System does not control lines. Geneseo makes its own decisions on Faculty lines. We were leaving lines open, and, when possible, filled with temporaries and adjuncts. Dixon said we had flexibility were staying away from the notion of retrenchment. She said we had some lines open here, but that was either because we had not found suitable people to fill them or because some departments had very good adjuncts in certain areas for the time being.

 

Bazzett noted that $2 billion of SUNY’s budget was coming from taxpayer money, but that was much less than SUNY generated—less than a third of our own budget. He noted that Chancellor King had been very calming and optimistic about the Budget at the University Senate Meeting. SUNY was in a tough time; the State had lost much taxpayer income from September 11; but we would get through it. We could maintain for a while until things got better.

 

Minutes of the Undergraduate Curriculum Committee

October 29, 2002

 

Members present: S. Brainard, J. Bushnell, J. Cope, A. Kline, R. McEwen, D. Norris, K. O'Neill, A. Stanley, B. Welker, P. Wong, T. Zollo, J. Zook. Visitors: J. Boiani, M. Lima, E. Spicka.

 

Chair J. Bushnell called the meeting to order at 4:02 p.m.

 

The first item of business was the new course, Engl 318, Black British Literature and Culture. J. Bushnell asked if the course has been taught as a slot course. M. Lima replied that she has taught the course since 1997 as a slot for various courses. The English Department agrees that the course should be offered as a permanent course. J. Zook asked if M. Lima is the only faculty member who can teach the course. M. Lima replied that she is presently the only person who could teach the course, adding that she spent her sabbatical researching and learning about this emerging area. She noted that adding this course to the English curriculum will diversify the department's course offerings and will make Geneseo a trend-setter since very few colleges offer a course with this same emphasis. B. Welker asked about past enrollment for the slot courses. M. Lima said enrollment has consistently been strong, with 35 students in the slot course this semester, and the course attracts a diverse student population. The proposal passed unanimously.

 

J. Zook suggested modifying the agenda by considering the Chemistry program revisions next. J. Bushnell suggested considering those four proposals as a single package. Committee members agreed with both suggestions. E. Spicka clarified the total number of credit hours involved in some of the proposals. The totals are correct but appear to be off by three credits in places where the credit hours are not listed after the menu of advanced courses from which students must select one. B. Welker asked about the related proposals to change Chem 240 to 340 and revise Chem 351. J. Boiani noted that dividing the Senior Seminar into two courses will allow students more time to develop skill in using information resources, critically reading scientific papers, attending seminars, preparing papers, and presenting an oral report. The restructured Senior Seminar courses will provide a capstone experience. The proposed changes also address departmental concern over whether there is too much discussion of analytical chemistry in the major. The proposal passed unanimously.

 

The proposals to revise Chem 240 (renumbering it 340 and changing the description) and Chem 351 passed unanimously without discussion.The proposed new courses, Chem 100 and Chem 352, also passed unanimously without discussion.

 

Unfinished business: J. Bushnell announced that she had received the updated rationale for the Biology program revision approved by the committee on Oct. 22. Although she could not find it in her stack of U.C.C. papers at the time, she has since found it. The revised rationale for the revision in the B.A. and B.S. in Biology reads in full: "The rationale for the revised program (only Biol 302, DNA Technology, or Bio 322, Molecular Biology, can be used as a Biology elective for the Biology major) is that we would like to have our students be exposed to diverse courses for their electives and not just focus on the molecular biology related areas."

 

The meeting adjourned at 4:17 p.m.

Respectfully submitted,

Judith Bushnell

 

UCC Proposal Summaries:

(Full text proposals are available for review by contacting the Office of the Dean of the College)

 

Meeting of October 22nd

Program revision - B.A. in Computer Science. Add CSci 119, R/Object-Oriented Programming (Subtitle) to the list of courses requiring a grade of C- or better for minimum competency. Rationale: When CSci 119 became a prerequisite for CSci 141 in fall 1999, it became the course that establishes a foundation of programming skills for the rest of the major. Faculty have observed that students who do not achieve minimum competence in the skills presented in CSci 119 have considerable difficulty in subsequent courses. The proposed change communicates the importance of CSci 119 to students and requires them to attain the necessary skills before continuing in the major. Interdepartmental impact: none.

 

Program revision - B.A. in Biology and B.S. in Biology. Add to description: Basic requirements: Electives in Biology. Students may receive Biology elective credit for Biol 302 (DNA Technology) or Biol 332

(Molecular Biology), but not both. Rationale: The Biology department wants to ensure breadth in electives by limiting the number of courses in molecular biology students may take as electives. Interdepartmental

impact: none.

 

New course: BCHM 393 - Honors Research. Bulletin description: Individual research at the molecular level on a topic of biochemical interest with a member of the Biology or Chemistry Department. A thesis that includes a statement of the research goals, pertinent background information, experimental procedures, analysis of data, and a discussion of the results is submitted at the completion of the project. After the thesis is accepted the student gives an oral presentation in the department in which the research was done. Enrollment is by invitation of the Biochemistry Coordinating Committee. The student must have completed the biochemistry program through Biol 300 and Chem 302 with a GPA of 3.3, and have an overall GPA of 3.25. Prerequisite: 2 credits of BIOL 399 or CHEM 399, or equivalent research experience. 4(0-12). Offered by individual arrangement. Rationale: Bchm 393 will provide the most capable students with an opportunity to participate in the research process at a much more intensive level than is available in a 1 or 2 credit hour directed study, and will provide them firsthand experience with the development of a research plan, review of pertinent literature, modern experimental procedures, and reporting findings orally and in a thesis. Interdepartmental impact: none.

 

New course: BIOL 128 - Freshman Experience in Biology. Bulletin description: This course is intended for students considering a major in Biology or Biochemistry. It is meant to engage students in their academic program and the college. The goals of the course are to give students a sense of community, provide help with study skills and introduce students to resources available at the college. This course is designed for freshmen. Other students may be able to enroll if space permits. 1(1-0) (S/U). Rationale: The small class size will allow better opportunity for student-faculty interaction and may help freshmen deal with a challenging course load and two large lecture classes. Interdepartmental impact:

none.

 

New course: BIOL 302 - DNA Technology. Bulletin description: This course will provide students with the basic knowledge of DNA technology and its application and significant benefits to humanity. The topics include the foundation and methods of DNA technology, pharmaceutical application, DNA analysis and diagnosis, gene therapy, forensics, DNA investigation, transgenic research and the human genome project. The course will also provide the relevant background and understanding of basic molecular biology techniques used in DNA technology. Students may receive Biology credit for this course or Biol 322 but not both. Pre-requisite: Biol 222. 3(3-0). Offered only in fall. Rationale: The course will provide students with basic knowledge about DNA technology and its impact on human life, topics that are becoming increasingly important. Interdepartmental impact: none.

 

New course: ENGL 406/306 - Writing for Teachers. Bulletin description: This course offers writing instruction to graduate students and advanced undergraduates who intend to teach. Students read writing theory, review English grammar, and write a series of essays over the course of the term. Graduate students in the course will be required to present their research findings on writing and pedagogy to the class. Prerequisite: graduate standing (for 406) or 60 completed credit hours (for 306). 3(3-0). Rationale: The course will supplement instruction in English Education and address the interests of teachers and teachers-in-training. Interdepartmental impact: none.

 

Meeting of October 29th

New Course: Engl 318 - Black British Literature and Culture. Bulletin description: A study of representative literature created and published in Britain by black writers, largely for a British audience. Those who were born in Britain are descendants of the wave of immigrants from Africa, Asia, and the Caribbean and offer a singularly black British account of their experience. 3(3-0). Offered spring even years.  Rationale: This course both enlarges the English Departments offerings in British literature and culture and fills in curricular gaps by introducing students to a new field in the discipline. Interdepartmental impact: none.

 

New Course: Chem 100 - Chemistry First Year Experience. Bulletin description: This course serves as an introduction to the chemistry and biochemistry programs at Geneseo and is intended for those considering a chemistry or biochemistry major. Topics include career opportunities, the literature of the chemist and biochemist, research opportunities, software used in the chemistry curriculum, and strategies for success. Graded on an S/U basis. Credits: 1(1-0). Rationale: It is hoped that the course will further the departments goal of increasing retention in the major by increasing student-student and faculty-student interaction and fostering the development of community. Interdepartmental impact: none.

 

New Course: Chem 352 - Chemistry Senior Seminar. Bulletin description: A seminar course designed to give students advanced scientific writing experience while preparing and formally presenting a scientific paper and demonstrating basic chemical knowledge. Prerequisite: Chemistry 351 or senior level status in the BS in Adolescence Certification (7-12) in Chemistry and General Science program. Only seniors should register. 1(1-0). Offered every spring. Rationale: The Chemistry Senior Seminar course has traditionally been a one credit hour course that spans two semesters. By dividing the current course into two separate courses (a revised Chemistry 351 and the new Chemistry 352), each semester will now focus on a different aspect of critically assessing and presenting scientific information. Separating the two courses will create extra time to read and evaluate information and enhance both courses with more experience in scientific information gathering and preparation. Interdepartmental impact: none.

 

Course Revision: Chem 340 - Modern Analytical Chemistry. Change course number and name from Chem 240 Analytical Chemistry to Chem 340 Modern Analytical Chemistry. Change from 3 credit hours to 4. New Bulletin description: A course to familiarize students with the theory and practice of analytical chemistry. Particular emphasis is given to the use of instrumental methods for quantitative analysis. Topics include calibration methods, error analysis, eletroanalytical chemistry, optical and mass spectroscopy, and separation methods. Rationale: Presently the advanced analytical chemistry component of the required courses for the B.S. programs in Chemistry is 6 credit hours (Chem 240 and 341) and for other Chemistry programs is 3 credit hours (Chem 240). The 6 credit hours limit the flexibility of the B.S. programs, and the 3 credit hours are insufficient to cover the basic important information in a rapidly growing area. The proposed 4-hour lecture/laboratory course provides sufficient time to cover the important topics during the lecture while maintaining the valuable laboratory experience now available in Chem 240. Also, the Department is proposing expanding the Senior Seminar requirement from one credit hour to two credit hours, and would like to avoid adding any more required hours to the B.S. program. The net effect for B.S. majors would be a decrease of one credit hour. Interdepartmental impact: none.

 

Course Revision: Chemistry 351 - Chemistry Seminar. Change title to Current Topics in Chemistry. New Bulletin description: Participants prepare for and attend seminars presented by visiting speakers. Short written and oral reports on topics related to the speaker's area of expertise will be developed from the current literature. Methods for chemistry information retrieval and effective reading of the chemical literature will be covered. Students will receive information about career choices in the field. Only seniors should register. 1(1-0). Offered every fall. Rationale: The department has determined that the current organization of the Chemistry Senior Seminar course does not allow sufficient time for students to develop fundamental skills such as the use of information resources and critical reading of scientific papers along with present requirements to attend seminars and prepare a paper including an oral report. The creation of a separate course focusing on teaching scientific writing and the modification of this course to concentrate on teaching scientific reading and literature searching skills will better serve the departments goals and provide a more active learning experience. Interdepartmental impact: none.

 

Program Revision: B.A. in Chemistry. Total credit hours required to complete the major will increase from 50 to 51, and basic requirements will increase from 34 semester hours to 35. Delete the following from the Basic Requirements: Chem 240, Chem 351 Senior Seminar, Chem 362 Advanced Laboratory II. Add the following to the Basic Requirements: Chem 340 Modern Analytical Chemistry (4 credits), Chem 351 Current Topics in Chemistry (1 credit), and Chem 352 Chemistry Senior Seminar (1 credit). Rationale: The Department is combining 6 credits of analytical chemistry offerings (Chem 240 and Chem 341) into one four credit hour course (Chem 340, which is a revision of Chem 240) for a more efficient presentation of the concepts and applications of analytical chemistry. The department is also revising its senior seminar program so that students will gain the added experience of reading and interpreting scientific literature while continuing the experience of preparing a research survey paper and presenting an oral summary of it. The extra work merits one more credit hour. In order to minimize the increase in credit hours the department has decided to delete Chemistry 362 Advanced Laboratory II from the program. Interdepartmental impact: none.

 

Program Revision: B.S. in Chemistry: American Chemical Society Certified. Total credit hours required to complete the major will decrease from 58 credit hours to 57, and the basic requirements will decrease from 42 semester hours to 41. Delete the following from the Basic Requirements: Chem 240, Chem 351 Senior Seminar. Add to Basic Requirements: Chem 340 Modern Analytical Chemistry (4 credits), Chem 351 Current Topcs in Chemistry (1 credit), and Chem 352 Chemistry Senior Seminar (1 credit); add Chem 341 to the list of advanced courses from which one must be selected. Rationale: The Department is combining 6 credits of analytical chemistry offerings (Chem 240 and Chem 341) into one four credit hour course (Chem 340, which is a revision of Chem 240) for a more efficient presentation of the concepts and applications of analytical chemistry. The combination reduces the required hours for the B.S. major by two, providing students more flexibility in their program and allowing the department to expand the Senior Seminar offering in a way that doesnt increase the required hours for the major. The extra work merits one more credit hour. Interdepartmental impact: none.

 

Program Revision: B.S. in Chemistry: American Chemical Society Certified; Biochemistry Option. Total credit hours required to complete the major will decrease from 72 to 70 or 71, and the basic requirements will decrease from 45 semester hours to 43 or 44. Delete the following from the Basic Requirements: Chem 240, Chem 341, Chem 351 Senior Seminar. Add to Basic Requirements: Chem 340 Modern Analytical Chemistry (4 credits), Chem 351 Current Topics in Chemistry and Chem 352 Chemistry Senior Seminar or Chem 385 Biochemistry Seminar (1 or 2 credits). Rationale: The Department is combining 6 credits of analytical chemistry offerings (Chem 240 and Chem 341) into one four credit hour course (Chem 340, which is a revision of Chem 240) for a more efficient presentation of the concepts and applications of analytical chemistry. The combination reduces the required hours for the B.S. major by two, providing students more flexibility in their program and allowing the department to expand the Senior Seminar offering in a way that doesnt increase the required hours for the major. The extra work merits one more credit hour. Interdepartmental impact: none.

 

Program Revision: B.S. Adolescence Certification (7-12) in Chemistry & General Science. Total credit hours required to complete the major will increase from 80 to 81, and basic requirements will increase from 29 semester hours to 30. Delete from Basic Requirements Chem 240. Add to Basic Requirements Chem 340 Modern Analytical Chemistry (4 credit hours). Rationale: The Department is combining 6 credits of analytical chemistry offerings (Chem 240 and Chem 341) into one four credit hour course (Chem 340, which is a revision of Chem 240) for a more efficient presentation of the concepts and applications of analytical chemistry. Chem 340 is a revision of Chem 240 which students must now take to meet their analytical chemistry requirement. Interdepartmental impact: none.