College Senate Bulletin

State University of New York at Geneseo

College of Arts and Sciences

 

Correspondence to Dennis Showers, School of Education, South 222C, showers@geneseo.edu, 245-5264

Note: Page numbers indicate pages as per the paper copy of the Bulletins.

 

Bulletin No. 4

 

 

 

 

Bulletin No.4

Pages 33-62

November 13, 2007

 

34 Agenda: Senate Meeting of November 20, 2007

36 UCC: Descriptions of Proposed Course and Program Changes for Senate Consideration

41 FAC: Proposal on Department Guidelines for Form H Categories

41 Minutes of the Undergraduate Curriculum Committee Meeting of October 30, 2007

44 Minutes of the Faculty Affairs Committee Meeting of October 30, 2007

45 Minutes of the All College Meeting of October 23, 2007

48 Minutes of the College Senate Meeting of October 23, 2007

51 Minutes of the Executive Committee Meeting of October 16, 2007

55 University Faculty Senator’s Report

61 Results of Fall 2007 Special Election

61 Call for Honors Course Proposals


 

 

 

Agenda for Senate Meeting on November 20, 2007

Call to Order

Adoption of the Agenda

Adoption of All College Minutes of October 23 (Bulletin #4, pages 45-48)

Adoption of the Senate Minutes of October 23 (Bulletin #4, pages 48-51)

Senate Reports

President Christopher Dahl

Provost Kate Conway-Turner

Chair David Granger

Vice Chair Dennis Showers

Past-Chair Dennis Showers

Treasurer Linda Ware

University Faculty Senator Maria Lima

Vice President, Student Assoc. Jarah Magan


Nomination Committee Report: Bill Gohlman

Presentation of Nominees for Faculty Personnel Committee

Presentation of Nominees for Committee on Nominations

Call for additional Nominations for Committee on Nominations


Reports of the Standing Committees of the Senate

Undergraduate Curricula Robert Owens

UCC Proposes For First Reading:

New courses (Listed on pages 36-37)

ARBC 101, Elementary Arabic I

ARBC 102, Elementary Arabic II

ARBC 201, Intermediate Arabic I

BIOL 116, N/General Biology Laboratory

BIOL 204, Ecology Laboratory

ENGL 336, Native American Literature

PHYS 387, Gravity

PLSC 227, Civil War and Conflict Resolution

PLSC 241, Politics of Genocide


Course revisions (Listed on pages 37-39)

ANTH 100, S/M/Introduction to Cultural Anthropology

ANTH 105, S/Introduction to Physical Anthropology

ANTH 110, Introduction to Archaeology

ANTH 120, S/Language and Culture

ANTH 201, Human Evolution

ANTH 202, Health, Culture, and Society

ANTH 203, Human Osteology

ANTH 204, Human Adaptation and Variation

ANTH 215, The Ancient Civilization in the Old World

ANTH 216, The African Diaspora

ANTH 220, Linguistic Analysis

ANTH 232, S/M/China and Issues of Modernization

ANTH 233, Primate Behavior

ANTH 243, Women in Cross-Cultural Perspective

ANTH 301, M/Religion, Society, and Culture

ANTH 305, Field Methods and Techniques in Linguistics

ANTH 307, Third World Development

ANTH 313, Global health Issues

ANTH 320, Archaic and Woodland Archaeology

ANTH 328, Language Acquisition

ANTH 323, Primate Behavioral Field methods

ANTH 324, Primate Behavior Lab Methods

BIOL 117, General Biology I: Cells, Genetics, Evolution

BIOL 119, General Biology II: Diversity, Physiology, Ecology

GEOG 366, The Orient and Oceania

GSCI 332, Glacial Geology

MATH 113, R/Finite Mathematics for Society

MATH 160, Elements of Chance

MATH 213, Applied Calculus

MATH 345, Numerical Analysis I

MATH 319, Theory of Numbers

MATH 348, Oral Presentation and Research Seminar

MATH 371, Introduction to Complex Analysis

MATH 383, Biomathematics Seminar

PHYS 311, Advanced Mechanics

PHYS 352, Quantum Mechanics

PHYS 353, Advanced Quantum Mechanics

PLSC 217, Public Administration and Bureaucracy

PLSC 251, Modern Political Analysis

PLSC 291, Enduring Issues in Comparative and International Politics

PLSC 324, Human Rights


Course deletions (Listed on page 39)

ACCT 311, Advanced Tax Accounting I

ACCT 321, Auditing II

BIOL 107, Human Fertility

BIOL 108, Age, Immunity, & Cancer

BIOL 374, Wildlife management

MATH 110, College Algebra

MATH 260, A Survey of Applied Statistics


New minor (Listed on pages 39-40)

Biomathematics

Central and Eastern European Studies


Revised major (Listed on page 40)

B.A. in Biology

B.S. in Biology

B.A. in International Relations


Revised minor (Listed on pages 40-41)

International Relations

Linguistics

Mathematics

Native American Studies

Physics

Religious Studies


UCC Proposes For Second Reading:

New Courses (Bulletin #3, pages 30-31)

AMST/HIST 262, American Indian Law and Public Policy

ANTH 392, Undergraduate Research Seminar in Anthropology

ECON 350, Law and Economics

ENGL 232, Topics in Pre-1700 British Literature (Slot course)

ENGL 233, Topics in Post-1700 British Literature (Slot course)

ENGL 320, Irish Literature

ENGL 359, Film Authors

GSCI 201, Geology of Alien Worlds

PLSC 326, Government and Politics of South America


Revised Courses (Bulletin #3, page 31)

ENGL 285, Film Classics

Changes are title to Introduction to Film Studies

Change in syllabus/requirements and course description

Change in hours 3 (2-2)

ENGL 317, Contemporary British Literature

Change is description

MGMT 370, International Business

Change is prerequisite


Deleted Course (Bulletin #3, page 31)

ENGL 362, Structure of English


Revised Major (Bulletin #3, page 31)

BA in Mathematics w/Certification in Adolescent Education

Proposed change in course requirements

BA in Psychology

Proposed changes include additional course and minimum grade requirement.

BS in Biochemistry

Proposed changes include courses, addition of coordinator position, and writing requirement


Revised Concentration (Bulletin #3, page 31)

English concentration

Proposed change updates course listings


Deletion of Minor (Bulletin #3, page 31)

Organizational and Occupational Behavior


Detailed proposals for all courses and programs can be found at

\\files.geneseo.edu\OutBox\DeanOfCollege\doc\ucc\Undergraduate Proposals/

 


Undergraduate Policies Ed Wallace

Graduate Academic Affairs Susan Salmon

Student Affairs Denise Scott

Faculty Affairs Joan Zook

FAC Proposal on Department Guidelines for Form H Categories (page 41)


Old Business

New Business

Adjournment


UCC Course and Program Descriptions


New courses

ARBC 101, Elementary Arabic I

Introduces the structure and sound of the target language. Develops the four language skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Culture-based readings and collateral laboratory assignments. This course is designed for students who have never studied the language before. In general, students who have a one-year high school equivalency may repeat this course, but for no credit. 3 (3-0).


ARBC 102, Elementary Arabic II

A continuation of 101. Prerequisite: 101 or its equivalent. 3 (3-0)


ARBC 201, Intermediate Arabic I

Reviews the fundamentals of structure and continues to develop the four language skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing. Oral and written exercises are included. Reading materials emphasize cultural and contemporary topics. Prerequisite: 102 or its equivalent. 3 (3-0)


BIOL 116, N/General Biology Laboratory

An introductory experience which develops laboratory and analytical skills in the biological sciences. Prerequisite or Co-requisite: either Biol. 117 or 119. Credits 2 (1-3). Offered every semester.


BIOL 204, Ecology Laboratory

Selected laboratory research projects in levels of ecological organization from organisms to populations, communities, and ecosystems. Prerequisite or corequisite: Biol 203. Credits 1(0-3).


ENGL 336, Native American Literature

A study of representative Native American literature written in English. Prerequisites: Engl 170 or permission of the instructor. Credits: 3 (3-0). Offered when demand is sufficient.


PHYS 387, Gravity

This course will cover Newtonian gravity, special and general relativity and cosmology.  Some of the topics include Newton's law of gravitation, Keplerian orbits, special relativity with spacetime diagrams and metrics, generalization to accelerated frames, the Equivalence Principle, curvature of spacetime, classical tests of GR, stationary and spinning black holes, large scale structure of the universe, big bang theory and the cosmological model. Prerequisite: PHYS 311 or permission of the department. Credits: 3(3-0)


PLSC 227, Civil War and Conflict Resolution

This course examines the phenomenon of civil war using a range of philosophical and theoretical approaches, as well as an abundance of empirical data about the incidence, characteristics, causes, duration, and cessation of civil war. We will focus our analysis on a few key questions: What are the major causes of civil war today? What comparative approaches best help us explain the prevalence of civil war? What special obstacles do civil wars present for conflict resolution? What means exist for countries caught in civil war to reach acceptable resolutions, re-assert the rule of law and accountability, and allow their societies to overcome divisions and reconcile? Credits: 3(3-0)


PLSC 241, Politics of Genocide

This course investigates the main causes and roots of evil and cruelty that are examined through learning about genocide in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Students will use the case method to study genocides and mass murders including the Armenian Genocide, the Holocaust, the Cambodian “killing fields”, Bosnia, Kosovo, Rwanda, and Darfur. While the primary emphasis will be on comparative political analysis of various genocides, the overall approach is interdisciplinary, drawing especially upon psychology, history, and religion. Credits: 3(3-0)


Course revisions

ANTH 100, S/M/Introduction to Cultural Anthropology

 

 

Description change.

ANTH 105, S/Introduction to Physical Anthropology

Description change.

ANTH 110, Introduction to Archaeology

Description change.

ANTH 120, S/Language and Culture

Description change.

ANTH 201, Human Evolution

Description change.

ANTH 202, Health, Culture, and Society

Description change.

ANTH 203, Human Osteology

Description change.

ANTH 204, Human Adaptation and Variation

Description change.

Title change to Human Ecology

ANTH 215, The Ancient Civilization in the Old World

Description change.

Title change to Ancient Civilizations of the Old World

ANTH 216, The African Diaspora

Description change.

ANTH 220, Linguistic Analysis

Description change.

ANTH 232, S/M/China and Issues of Modernization

Description change.

Title change to S/M/China and Modernization

ANTH 233, Primate Behavior

Description change.

Title change to Primates

ANTH 243, Women in Cross-Cultural Perspective

Description change.

ANTH 301, M/Religion, Society, and Culture

Description change.

ANTH 305, Field Methods and Techniques in Linguistics

Description change.

ANTH 307, Third World Development

Description change.

ANTH 313, Global Health Issues

Description change.

ANTH 320, Archaic and Woodland Archaeology

Description change.

Title change to Archaeology Field School

ANTH 328, Language Acquisition

Description change.

ANTH 323, Primate Behavioral Field methods

Offering change to conform to Study Abroad

Title change to Primate Field School

ANTH 324, Primate Behavior Lab Methods

Description change.

Title change to Research Methods in Primatology

BIOL 117, General Biology I: Cells, Genetics, Evolution

Incorporating the new BIOL 116

BIOL 119, General Biology II: Diversity, Physiology, Ecology

Incorporating the new BIOL 116

GEOG 366, The Orient and Oceania

Title change to Geography of the Western Pacific Rim

GSCI 332, Glacial Geology

Description and credit changes

MATH 113, R/Finite Mathematics for Society

Prerequisite change removes MATH 110

MATH 160, Elements of Chance

Prerequisite change removes MATH 110

MATH 213, Applied Calculus

Prerequisite change removes MATH 110

MATH 345, Numerical Analysis I

Prerequisite change adds “permission of instructor”

MATH 319, Theory of Numbers

Prerequisite change

MATH 348, Oral Presentation and Research Seminar

Prerequisite change

MATH 371, Introduction to Complex Analysis

Prerequisite change

MATH 383, Biomathematics Seminar

Description change to allow it to be taken multiple times with permission

PHYS 311, Advanced Mechanics

Title change to Classical Mechanics

PHYS 352, Quantum Mechanics

Title change to Quantum Mechanics I

PHYS 353, Advanced Quantum Mechanics

Title change to Quantum Mechanics II

PLSC 217, Public Administration and Bureaucracy

Title change to Public Administration

PLSC 251, Modern Political Analysis

Prerequisite change

PLSC 291, Enduring Issues in Comparative and International Politics

Description change drops “Designed primarily for the non-majoring student.”

PLSC 324, Human Rights

Number and Title change to PLSC 342, “Human Rights in a Global Perspective”


Course deletions

ACCT 311, Advanced Tax Accounting I

ACCT 321, Auditing II

BIOL 107, Human Fertility

BIOL 108, Age, Immunity, & Cancer

BIOL 374, Wildlife management

MATH 110, College Algebra

MATH 260, A Survey of Applied Statistics


New minor

Biomathematics

The Minor in Biomathematics is designed to provide students with a broad introduction to the applications of mathematics in modern biology. Combining a background in biology with a background in mathematics, students completing a minor in biomathematics will be well-prepared to understand and contribute to current research questions in the field, ranging from molecular to population studies using both continuous and discrete modeling approaches.


Requirements:

Total hours to complete the minor: 30

 

 

Central and Eastern European Studies

Total required hours: 24

Requirements (15 hours):

PLSC 225, PLSC229/HIST229, HIST342

RUSS202 or GERM202

HIST 242, HIST 344 or PLSC 329

Electives (9 hours): Choose 1 course from the Social Sciences and 2 additional courses in Arts, Literature & Language. One of the 3 courses must be at 300-level. Note that slot courses may be used when offered with subtitles appropriate to Central Eastern Europe:

Social Sciences (Choose 1):

ANTH 325, COMN 317, COMN 362, COMN 368, HIST 203, HIST 247, HIST 349, HIST 39, INTD 250/350, PHIL 207, PLSC 248, PLSC 291, SOCL 378, SOCL 381

Arts, Literature, Languages (Choose 2):

ARTH 201, ARTH 287, ARTH 300, THEA 305, ENGL 241, ENGL 250, ENGL 267, ENGL 343, ENGL 348, ENGL 358, ENGL 394, GERM 313, GERM 325, GERM 335, INTD 250/350

No more than three courses from one department can be applied to the Central and Eastern European Studies minor.

No more than 9 hours submitted for the minor may overlap with the student’s major or other minor.

Directed Study, Slot, Experimental, or New Courses concerning Central and/or Eastern Europe may be applied to the minor with prior approval from the Coordinator.

Students should note that some 300-level courses have prerequisites.


Revised major

B.A. in Biology

BIOL 116 replaces 118 & 120

B.S. in Biology

BIOL 116 replaces 118 & 120

B.A. in International Relations

Deletion of PLSC 228

Deletion of PLSC 227 in War and Peace Studies Track

Addition of PLSC 241 and PLSC 342 in War and Peace Studies Track

Addition or PLSC 227, 326, and 342 in Developing World Track


Revised minor

International Relations

Students will now choose from among courses in tracks

Linguistics

Course substitutions

Changes in recommended courses

Mathematics

Removes MATH 260

Native American Studies

Specifies courses including new ENGL 336

Physics

Decreases requirement from 22 to 20 hours, removes PHYS 362, and adds note on MATH co-requisite and pre-requisite courses

Religious Studies

Replaces PHIL 118 with PHIL 202


Detailed proposals for all courses and programs can be found at

http://boxes.geneseo.edu/outboxes/DeanOfCollege/doc/ucc/Undergraduate%20Proposals/


FAC Proposal on Department Guidelines for Form H Categories


We recommend that departments review or create guidelines about which types of activities fall within each category on the H Form (Teaching, Contributions to the Discipline, and Service).


We also recommend that each department or school revise or create clear expectations identifying the types and levels of activities falling under each category of evaluation that are appropriate within that discipline’s culture. These expectations should be clearly defined for each of the various levels of evaluation: contract renewal, continuing appointment, and promotion to Associate and Full Professor. Information that would help evaluators outside the discipline regarding the relative significance of the different types of discipline-specific activities should be included.


These guidelines should be forwarded to the Provost’s Office for further refinement and approval by December 1, 2008, and thereafter publicized to candidates and provided to the Faculty Personnel Committee of the College with candidates’ materials.


Minutes of the Undergraduate Curriculum Committee

October 30, 2007


Present: Bob Owens (Chair), Paul Pacheco, Rick Coloccia, Chris Leary, Terry Bazzett, Douglas Baldwin, Cassie Brown, Sue Ann Brainard, Tracy Paradis, Jeff Johannes, Robert Doggett


Guests: Kurt Fletcher, Cynthia Klima, Lori Bernard, Jani Lewis, Ray Spear.


Call to Order


Chair Owens called the meeting to order at 4:01 p.m.

 

Approval of the Agenda

 

Announcements:

Many changes in course and programs are due to the new catalog deadline and are only minor changes.

Wouldn’t have received new courses proposals without prior approval from Provost, especially those requiring new faculty hires.

Motion and second. Unanimous.

Approval of the minutes of the October 2, 2007 meeting

Motion and second. Unanimous.

New courses

ARBC 101, Elementary Arabic I

ARBC 102, Elementary Arabic II

ARBC 201, Intermediate Arabic I

Motion to approve as block. Unanimous.


BIOL 116, N/General Biology Laboratory

BIOL 204, Ecology Laboratory

Motion to approve as block. Unanimous.


ENGL 336, Native American Literature

Motion to approve. Unanimous.


PHYS 387, Gravity

Clarification: Introduce physical ideas and build to math required.

Motion to approve. Unanimous.


PLSC 227, Civil War and Conflict Resolution

PLSC 241, Politics of Genocide

Review of PLSC 241 due to files not opening – compatibility issues. All members need Windows 2007 conversion or update.

Motion to approve. Unanimous.


Course revisions

ANTH 100, 105, 110, 120, 201, 202, 203, 204, 215, 216, 220, 232, 233, 243, 301, 305, 307, 313, 320, 328, 323, & 324

Discussion: ANTH232 syllabus needs name change.

305 title needs to read “Field methods”

Motion to approve as block. Unanimous.


BIOL 117, General Biology I: Cells, Genetics, Evolution

BIOL 119, General Biology II: Diversity, Physiology, Ecology

Motion to approve as block. Unanimous.


GEOG 366, The Orient and Oceania

Motion to approve as block. Unanimous.


GSCI 332, Glacial Geology

Motion to approve as block. Unanimous.


MATH 113, R/Finite Mathematics for Society

MATH 160, Elements of Chance

MATH 213, Applied Calculus

MATH 345, Numerical Analysis I

MATH 319, Theory of Numbers

MATH 348, Oral Presentation and Research Seminar

MATH 371, Introduction to Complex Analysis

MATH 383, Biomathematics Seminar

Motion to approve as block. Unanimous.


PHYS 311, Advanced Mechanics

PHYS 352, Quantum Mechanics

PHYS 353, Advanced Quantum Mechanics

Motion to approve as block. Unanimous.


PLSC 217, Public Administration and Bureaucracy

PLSC 251, Modern Political Analysis

PLSC 291, Enduring Issues in Comparative and International Politics

PLSC 324, Human Rights

Motion to approve as block. Unanimous.

Course deletions

ACCT 311, Advanced Tax Accounting I

ACCT 321, Auditing II

Motion to approve as block. Unanimous.


BIOL 107, Human Fertility

BIOL 108, Age, Immunity, & Cancer

BIOL 374, Wildlife management

Motion to approve as block. Unanimous.


MATH 110, College Algebra

MATH 260, A Survey of Applied Statistics

Motion to approve as block. Unanimous.

New minor

Biomathematics

Motion to approve. Unanimous.


Central and Eastern European Studies

Motion to approve. Unanimous.

Revised major

B.A. in Biology

Motion to approve. Unanimous.


B.S. in Biology

Motion to approve. Unanimous.


B.A. in International Relations

Motion to approve. Unanimous.

 

 

Revised minor

International Relations

Discussion: Where are tracks defined? Minor tracks are the same as the Major.

Discussion: There is no ANTH 261. Problem with interdisciplinary programs: when course is deleted, originating department is required to contact other departments. Electronic records will make this easier now.

Motion to approve. Unanimous.


Linguistics

Motion to approve. Unanimous.


Mathematics

Motion to approve. Unanimous.


Native American Studies

Discussion: Course names for ANTH 260 changed to Myths and Folktales; ANTH 320 to Archaeological Field School. As constructed, courses will still fit the minor.

Motion to approve. Unanimous.


Physics

Discussion: Decreases requirement from 22 to 20. Removed Physics 362. Current bulletin has misprint in total number of hours.

Motion to approve. Unanimous.


Religious Studies

Motion to approve. Unanimous.

Old Business

No old business.


New Business

Discussion: Post proposed courses as single PDF for committee vs. email attachments, append as needed. Eventually courses are compiled as PDF and posted to Senate. Create outbox to pick up. Confidentiality doesn’t seem to be an issue. If there is alternatives are ERES, My Courses or a password protected folder. Agreed.


When are proposals for next year due (i.e. Fall 2008) into UCC? With conversion of bulletin to electronic, dates become more flexible. Two senate readings are required before approval prior to the master schedule coming out for the fall semester. Final date is still in flux for the catalogue because of conversion to electronic version.

Adjournment

Motion to adjourn. Unanimous.


Minutes of the Faculty Affairs Committee

October 30, 2007

South Hall 309


Present: J. Zook (Chair) L. Blackman, S. Choi, B. Colón, J. Morse, J. Lovett, P. MacLean, J. McLean, B. Reilly, A. Stanley, A. Sheldon, and H. Waddy


Call to Order


Chair J. Zook called the meeting to order at 4:00 PM.


Chair’s Report

Up-dates

1. IDEA form pilot will happen in Summer of 2008

2. Faculty salary compression issue.

The FAC committee will invite the Provost to clarify other questions concerning future allocations, such as how merit will be measured next year.

3. Recommendations for departments to develop set of evaluation expectations.

The proposed date for departments will probably be set for December 1st of 2008.

The proposal must first clear the Executive Committee before going before the Senate.

4. Confidentiality issues raised by the Provost. FAC discussed the possibility of including a statement pertaining to confidentiality in future renewal forms.

5. Next meeting is on Tuesday. Nov. 13th, 4-5pm, in the Union 325.

 

Summary of Recommendations from Task Force on Advising, Amy Sheldon, speaker
Task Force has prepared its report on Advising and has submitted it to the Provost for review. It will be released to the public after the review.
Can reveal the following facts so far:
 
 
  • 72% of students responded.

  • 76% of faculty responded.

  • Multiple complex problems were evident.

  • Communicative issues between students and faculty arose, as well as equity issues for faculty.

  • Two types of advising are taking place: 1) prescriptive – helping students pick out classes. 2) developmental – assisting students in designing portfolio objectives to help with career choices or graduate school decisions.

  • Faculty much prefer developmental over prescriptive advising.

 
Old Business – Revision of the Form H.
We will address related issues in the next meeting.
The Service Category should be maintained as a separate category.
Adjournment
Chair J. Zook adjourned the meeting at 5 PM
Respectfully submitted,
Amy Stanley

 

 


All-College Minutes

23 October 2007

Present: D. Granger (Chair), D. Aagesen, J. Andrews, L. Argentieri, S. Bailey, D. Baldwin, T. Bazzett, I. Belyakov, L. Blackman, C. Brown, D. Brown, D. Campbell, S. Chen, R. Coloccia, K. Conway-Turner, J. Cope, S. Crilly, C. Dahl, R. Doggett, J. Dolce, A. Eisenberg, T. Ellis, C. Garrity, E. Gillin, S. Giorgis, E. Hall, M. Harrigan, W. Harrison, G. Hartvigsen, K. Hennig, A. Herman, K. Keegan, T. Kenney, M. Klotz, R. Lang, C. Leary, K. Levison, J. Lewis, J. Lovett, D. Mackenzie, P. MacLean, J. Magan, C. Matthews, J. McLean, J. Morse, L. O’Brien, B. Owens, P. Pacheco, T. Paradis, J. Parent, K. Pitcher, D. Raynor, D. Robertson, S. Salmon, D. Scott, F. Sheikh, A. Sheldon, D. Showers, A. Stanley, C. Tesler, E. Wallace, J. Zook


Guest: E.R. Johnson


Call to Order


Chair Granger called the All-College Meeting to order at 4:03 PM.


Adoption of the Agenda (College Senate Bulletin #3, p.27)


The agenda was adopted without corrections or additions


Nominations Committee Report


B. Gohlman, who could not attend the meeting, is still waiting to hear from all of the departments regarding their nominees for the Faculty Personnel Committee. We currently do not have anyone nominated for the Committee on Nominations, so please take this into consideration.


Professional Leave Review Committee nominees:

  1. Harold Hoops, Biology – Natural Sciences

  2. Michael Oberg, History – Humanities


General Education:

- Still need a nominee from Fine Arts – please consider


University Faculty Senator Alternate

- Have not received any nominees – please consider


Chair Granger asked for nominations from the floor for any of these positions. There were none. Granger also reported that B. Gohlman would like to keep the nominations open until there are enough nominees for all of the open positions. There was no objection


Proposed Amendment to Faculty Constitution Articles V, VI, & By-Laws: Senate Chair, Vice Chair, Past Chair: Terms and Duties


College Senate Executive Committee—proposed revisions to Faculty Constitution


D. Showers explained that the motivation for changing the term and duties of the Chair came from SUNY Campus Governance Leaders who had served as Senate Chair. This amendment was designed to separate the Chair and Vice Chair and allow for more than one term for the Chair, if a person chooses to serve more than one. One of the reasons for making this change is that when a Chair is only serving for one year, each new person comes in somewhat inexperienced. However, by the time his or her term ends, he or she has a much better understanding of what the role entails. But if he or she was willing to serve an additional term (or more), he or she would bring valuable experience in serving that additional term. If a person serves a second term as Chair, then the Chair can appoint a member of Senate to carry out the duties of the Immediate Past Chair.


Discussion followed about whether to make the Chair a one-term or multi-term position and whether that term should be one or two years. Concerns ranged from not having an experienced Chair if the person didn’t first have to serve as Vice Chair, to the issue of people not wanting to commit for a two-year term but rather having the flexibility to decide for themselves after serving as Chair for a one-year term.


D. Showers offered to take these ideas back to the Executive Committee for further discussion. A vote on the proposed amendment will take place no less than thirty days from the All-College Meeting.


ARTICLE V: OFFICERS

Section 1: The elected officers of the Faculty shall be the Chair, the Vice Chair, the Secretary, the Treasurer, and the Immediate Past Chair. They shall also serve in these capacities for the College Senate.

Section 2: The Chair shall be elected as specified in Section 6 to serve a one-year term to expire on May 31. A vacancy in the office of Chair shall be filled by the Vice-Chair until an election can be conducted to find a replacement. If the Executive Committee decides no election is necessary due to the time remaining in the Chair’s term, it may approve the Vice Chair to complete the term of the Chair. Reelection to the position of Chair is possible.

Section 3: The Vice Chair shall be elected as specified in Section 6 to serve a one-year term to expire on May 31. A vacancy in the office of Vice Chair shall be filled by an appointment by the Chair with the consent of the Executive Committee. Re-election is possible.

Section 4: The Secretary and Treasurer shall be elected as specified in Section 4 to serve one-year terms. These terms shall expire on May 31. Any vacancy in either of these offices shall be filled by appointment by the Chair with the consent of the Executive Committee. Re-election is permissible. The term of office of the Chair shall expire on May 31, unless the incumbent shall have become Chair after the start of the Spring Semester of that year, in which case it will expire on the May 31 following. Any vacancy in the office of Chair, whether at the expiration of the term of office or at any other time, shall be filled immediately by the incumbent Vice Chair. Any vacancy in the office of Vice Chair shall be filled by election as specified in Section 4.

Section 5: The University Faculty Senator, elected in the Fall semester of the incumbent's term, shall be considered an officer of the Faculty and representative officer to the College Senate. The Alternate University Faculty Senator shall be the person receiving the second highest number of votes. The term of office for the University Faculty Senator and the Alternate shall be three years and shall expire on May 31 with re-election possible in accordance with University Faculty Senate Bylaws. The Alternate University Faculty Senator shall act in the absence of the University Faculty Senator only on matters described in ARTICLE VI, Section 5 of this Constitution. Any vacancy in the office of University Faculty Senator shall be filled immediately by the Alternate. Any vacancy in the office of Alternate shall be filled by election as in Section 4.

Section 6: Election to the offices as specified in Sections 1- 4 and 2 shall be by secret ballot by the highest number of votes cast by the Faculty from a slate prepared by the Committee on Nominations. Elections shall be held not later than April 15 for vacancies occurring through expiration of term of office. Elections to fill vacancies occurring at other times shall be held within the first two weeks that the College is in session following the occurrence of the vacancy.

ARTICLE VI: DUTIES OF OFFICERS


Section 2: The Vice-Chair. The Vice-Chair shall, in the absence of the Chair, preside at meetings of the College Senate, the Executive Committee, and the Faculty, and represent the Faculty at appropriate College functions. S/He shall assume responsibility for all duties delegated by the Chair. S/He shall serve as the Chair of the Excellence Awards and Distinguished Ranks Committee.

Section 6: Immediate Past Chair. The Immediate Past Chair shall serve as an advisor to the Chair. The Immediate Past Chair shall serve a one-year term to end on May 31 of the year following the completion of her/his term as Chair. The Immediate Past Chair serves as a member of the Strategic Planning Advisory Group. If there is no Immediate Past Chair, the Chair may appoint a member of Senate to serve in any capacity that would have been held by the Immediate Past Chair.

(Change the current Section 6 to Section 7)


BY-LAWS

ARTICLE 1: ELECTIONS

Section 2: Elective Procedures

a.   Presentation of the Slate of Officers

1.       One month before the annual election, the Committee on Nominations shall present a slate of nominees for Chair, Vice Chair, Secretary, and Treasurer. The Committee shall also prepare a slate of nominees for Senators-at-Large at the designated time requested by the Executive Committee.


Proposed Amendment to Faculty Constitution Article VI: Senate Secretary Duties


College Senate Executive Committee—proposed revisions to Faculty Constitution


After having the good fortune of Graham Drake serving as Senate Secretary for the past few years, there is now a need to find someone willing to take on this role. No one has come forth. In talks with the Provost, the Executive Committee has been able to work out an arrangement whereby the minutes of the Senate and Executive Committee meetings will be taken by a member of the clerical staff, so that the job of the Senate Secretary would be clerk of Senate, moderating the Faculty-L list serve and maintaining the College Senate website.


No major concerns with this proposed amendment were raised. D. Showers stated that a vote on the proposed amendment will take place no less than thirty days from the All-College Meeting.


Adjournment

Chair Granger adjourned the All College Meeting at 4:20 PM.


Respectfully submitted,


Terry Holbrook

Interim College Senate Secretary


Senate Minutes

23 October 2007


Present: D. Granger (Chair), D. Aagesen, J. Andrews, L. Argentieri, S. Bailey, D. Baldwin, T. Bazzett, I. Belyakov, L. Blackman, C. Brown, D. Brown, D. Campbell, S. Chen, R. Coloccia, K. Conway-Turner, J. Cope, S. Crilly, C. Dahl, R. Doggett, J. Dolce, A. Eisenberg, T. Ellis, C. Garrity, E. Gillin, S. Giorgis, E. Hall, M. Harrigan, W. Harrison, G. Hartvigsen, K. Hennig, A. Herman, K. Keegan, T. Kenney, M. Klotz, R. Lang, C. Leary, K. Levison, J. Lewis, J. Lovett, D. Mackenzie, P. MacLean, J. Magan, C. Matthews, J. McLean, J. Morse, L. O’Brien, B. Owens, P. Pacheco, T. Paradis, J. Parent, K. Pitcher, D. Raynor, D. Robertson, S. Salmon, D. Scott, F. Sheikh, A. Sheldon, D. Showers, A. Stanley, C. Tesler, E. Wallace, J. Zook


Guest: E.R. Johnson


Call to Order


Chair Granger called the Senate to order at 4:21 PM.


Adoption of the agenda (College Senate Bulletin #3, pp.28-29)


The agenda was adopted without corrections or additions.


Adoption of the minutes of September 25, 2007


The minutes of the previous meeting were adopted without corrections or additions.


Senate Reports

President’s Report

President Dahl testified at the hearing of the Governor’s Commission on Higher Education in Buffalo last week. He focused on tuition policy, asking for variable campus-based tuition, a rational tuition policy and tuition that is not one-size-fits-all but is fair and equitable and reflects differences in program mix and campus missions. The presidents from Fredonia and Buffalo State also testified in support of the agenda items for western New York, which are:

 
  • Establish a rational tuition policy

  • Provide SUNY with greater flexibility

  • Stabilize state support

  • Continue baseline funding for capital construction

  • Replace part-time faculty with full-time faculty

  • Expand support for graduate education and research


This was a unified message from SUNY Presidents. December 1st is the deadline for the preliminary report to go to the Governor.

It looks as though the period of suspended animation in SUNY may be coming to an end. The Senate Higher Education Committee has held hearings on the nominee for SUNY Board Chair (Carl Hayden) and one trustee (H. Carl McCall), who will apparently be confirmed this week in a special senate session. This means that we will have a SUNY Board Chair in place; the Trustees will start meeting again, and the first thing they will do is put in place a search committee for the new Chancellor.


Senator Kenneth LaValle, Chair of the Higher Education Committee is coming to visit us tomorrow. We will get his impressions of what is going on in Albany and communicate our needs for funding a support.


Thanks to those who participated in Family Weekend. This is an important communication tool to use with parents and other family members.


A reminder that Julian Bond will be giving the Wadsworth Lecture at 8:00 pm in Wadsworth Auditorium. Bond will be a very exciting speaker. He is a distinguished historian of the civil rights movement, and he is a large part of the history of the civil rights movement.


Finally President Dahl asked that Chair Granger prepare a resolution for Senate to express condolences to the family of Kaitlin Charity, the student killed in an accident on Route 390 near Groveland on Saturday morning. Kaitlin’s mother was a Geneseo graduate. He then asked the senate to pause for 30 seconds in remembrance of Kate.


Provost’s Report

The Provost received the report from the Task Force on Advisement. She thanked David Granger and Amy Sheldon for doing an excellent job and for providing the necessary leadership throughout the process of putting the report together. It certainly gives us much to think about and to improve on concerning advisement.


2. The Mule Train Exhibit was opened yesterday in both the Lockhart and Lederer Galleries. Roland Freeman spoke yesterday and had stories and letters with pictures, which really gave insight into the civil rights movement. The Opening Reception is October 22nd at 4:30 at the Lockhart Gallery, McClellan House and I hope to see all of you there.

Chair’s Report

Reminder that the SEFA deadline is November 2nd. Currently donations are at $27,000 and the goal is $47, 500. Typically, one-third of the college employees donate, so please consider donating, even a small amount is helpful and appreciated.


Please do the best that you can to help out the Committee on Nominations. We have some really important things that the college committees need to be doing. Keep your eyes open for our special election, which should be happening very soon. This election will run for just one week because we need to end the special election before we can begin the regular fall election.


A motion was made to send Kaitlin Charity’s family condolences from the College Senate. The motion passed unanimously.

Vice-Chair’s Report
The Excellence Awards and Distinguished Ranks process is moving along. To date, we have received nominees for Excellence in Teaching, Excellence in Faculty Service and Excellence in Scholarship and Creative Activity. We will begin reviewing candidates shortly.

Past-Chair’s Report
No Report
 
Treasurer’s Report
No Report

University Faculty Senator’s Report
No Report

Student Association Vice-President’s Report
No Report

Undergraduate Curriculum Committee
Several new courses, revised courses, deleted courses, revised majors, revised concentrations, a deleted minor (CSB#3 pp.30-31) were considered and passed on their first readings.

New Courses
AMST/HIST 262, American Indian Law and Public Policy
ANTH 392, Undergraduate Research Seminar in Anthropology
ECON 350, Law and Economics
ENGL 232, Topics in Pre-1700 British Literature (Slot course)
ENGL 233, Topics in Post-1700 British Literature (Slot course)
ENGL 320, Irish Literature
ENGL 359, Film Authors
GSCI 201, Geology of Alien Worlds
PLSC 326, Government and Politics of South America

Revised Courses
ENGL 285, Film Classics
Changes are title to Introduction to Film Studies
Change in syllabus/requirements and course description
ENGL 317, Contemporary British Literature
Change is description
MGMT 370, International Business
Change is prerequisite

Deleted Course
ENGL 362, Structure of English

Revised Major
BA in Mathematics w/Certification in Adolescent Education
Proposed change in course requirements
BA in Psychology
Proposed changes include additional course and minimum grade requirement.
BS in Biochemistry
Proposed changes include courses, addition of coordinator position, and writing requirement

Revised Concentration
English concentration
Proposed change updates course listings

Deletion of Minor
Organizational and Occupational Behavior

Undergraduate Policies Committee
No report.

Graduate Academic Affairs Committee
No report.

Student Affairs Committee
D. Scott reported that at the committee’s first meeting they discussed biased-related incidents and strategies to combat bias and discrimination on campus. Although no proposals were made, the committee did suggest workshops and courses, and believes that some of these be mandatory, especially for freshman.

Faculty Affairs Committee
Chair J. Zook reported the following concerning FAC’s activities:

Currently working on department-based written expectations for tenure and promotion and expect to have a proposal ready for the next Senate meeting.
 
Continuing work on and considering recommendations from the Task Force on Roles, Rewards and Evaluation.
At the request of Provost Conway-Turner, the committee will also be looking at faculty mentoring this year.
Planning to follow up on the “IDEA form” for student evaluations of faculty to replace the SOFI.
The Provost noted that they are planning to do a pilot on this in the summer of 2008.
Would like to look at some potential changes to the Form H.
Will also be looking at the faculty salary compression issue.

J. Zook welcomed thoughts, comments or concerns on any of these issues.


Old Business
There was no old business.

New Business
There was no new business.

Adjournment
Chair Granger adjourned the Senate at 4:47PM

Respectfully submitted,
Terry Holbrook
Interim College Senate Secretary


Executive Committee Meeting Minutes

16 October 2007


Present: C. Dahl, K. Conway-Turner, D. Granger (Chair), T. Holbrook, M. Lima, J. Magan, B. Owens, S. Salmon, D. Showers, D. Scott, L. Ware, J. Zook

Call to Order

Chair Granger called the Executive Committee to order at 4:04 pm.
Adoption of the Agenda

The agenda was approved without corrections or additions.

Adoption of the Minutes

The minutes were approved without corrections or additions.

Reports
 
President’s Report

President Dahl mentioned that he testified last week at the Commission on Higher Education in Buffalo, basically arguing for predictable and flexible tuition policy and noting that students need equitable access to excellence.

The President and the Provost are looking at faculty salary enhancements, in addition to trying to bring people up to means by rank and field they will also try to prevent future compression. One way will be by changing the increment when promoted from Associate to Full Professor which was $2500 and will now be $5000.
We have many visitors and distinguished speakers coming to campus.  Faculty and staff are invited to pay special attention to upcoming dates and make every attempt to attend these lectures and exhibits.

Roland Freeman, a distinguished photographer of the black freedom struggle and the civil rights movement, has two exhibits that will run simultaneously October 22 through November 17, 2007--"The Mule Train:  A Journey of Hope Remembered" at the Bertha V.B. Lederer Gallery and "Some Things of Value:  African and African American Expressive Culture" at the Lockhart Gallery.  Roland Freeman will give a lecture and multi-media presentation on October 22 at 3:00 p.m. in Alice Austin Theatre.

Julian Bond will give this year's Wadsworth Lecture entitled "Civil Rights:  In the Day, Today and Tomorrow" on October 24th at 8:00 p.m. in Wadsworth Auditorium.
Dr. Sang-Chul Lee, President of Kwangwoon University and former CEO of Korea Telecom, will deliver the Fall Business Lecture entitled, "Information Technology in Korea:  A New Social Infrastructure" on October 17 at 7:00 p.m. in Newton 204.  We are working on a faculty exchange and internships with Kwangwoon.  President Dahl will visit Korea later in October to participate in a Presidents' Symposium on Higher Education at Sogang University.

Provost’s Report

Tomorrow, Wednesday, there will be another open forum of the Task Force on Curriculum. The focus for this meeting will be general education. People are encouraged to come and share their views. This will be the third open forum, with two more scheduled for this semester. The feedback at the meetings has been very good, and ranges from what people like and dislike about a program to things that should improve and even comparisons with what other institutions are doing.
The Provost received the Report from the Advisement Task Force last week. Her thanks went out to David (Granger) and Amy (Sheldon) for their hard work on complicated and complex issues. After she has a chance to digest the report she will share the data and begin talks on what we should do to address the concerns and recommendations.

Chair’s Report

The newest member of the Senate is Sue Crilly, serving as the rep. for College Advancement. The Student Services rep will be determined within the next couple of days.
In an attempt to align the procedures with the Constitution for the Strategic Planning Advisory Group, the Provost put together a table showing the terms for each classification. There was a brief discussion as to why it was suggested that a 4th faculty member be added. For now, it will continue with 3 faculty members, but D. Granger will check the records to see why 4 was suggested in the past and if it should be considered for the future.
Bulletin #2 was sent to the printer last week, so it should be distributed in paper form very soon.
Bulletin #3 is coming out this evening.
D. Granger will be sending out an announcement to the all-staff and student lists as a reminder of the All College meeting next Tuesday and to let people know that we will be reviewing election nominees and some constitutional amendments.
D. Granger is also looking at some proposals and suggestions for changes to the Senate membership. M. Lima has been helping to do some research by looking back to see where we ended with these proposals or if these issues are still hanging.
D. Granger is preparing the website for the special election for the 3 General Education Reps., 2 Professional Leave Review Reps. and our Faculty Senate Alternate. This election will run for a week and then be wrapped up before the regular Fall election.
D. Granger reported that committees would like to have the ability to review the minutes before they go into the bulletin and the Executive Committee agreed that this could be handled via email.
Vice-Chair’s Report
D. Showers reported that currently the nominations for Excellence in Distinguished Ranks are as follows: 2 for Excellence in Faculty Service, 3 for Excellence in Scholarship and Creative Activity, and 5 for Excellence in Teaching.
Past Chair’s Report
D. Showers noted that the next project will be to meet with the Nominations Committee and see if they would agree to be the “Nominations and Elections Committee.” He believes that elections would be better handled by a committee than by one person.
Treasurer’s Report
L. Ware announced that there are very few funds coming in. She plans to continue to remind people via email that if the fund does not continue to grow, there will not be funding for the things that have received funding in the past. It was noted that the initial request went out just before the SEFA Campaign started, so it would be wise to continue to stress the importance of this fund to the faculty.
University Faculty Senator’s Report – No Report.
Student Association Vice-President’s Report
J. Magan was happy to report that they have all of their senators. At their first senate caucus meeting they decided to go over resumes. At their next gathering, she would like to go over student senators’ profiles on Facebook, as might a job interviewer, and point out the positive and negatives of the information they have listed.
Undergraduate Curriculum Committee Report – No report
Policy Committee Report – No report.
Graduate Academic Affairs Committee Report – No Report
Student Affairs Committee Report
D. Scott said that at their first meeting they discussed biased-related incidents and strategies to combat bias and discrimination on campus. Although no proposals were made, the committee did suggest workshops and courses, and suggested that some of these be mandatory, especially for freshman. Students on the committee feel that not enough students are being reached with the current information. The committee will continue to work on this issue and report back to the Senate.
Faculty Affairs Committee Report
Chair J. Zook reported the following concerning FAC’s activities:
Currently working on department-based written expectations for promotion to bring to senate.
Continuing work and getting recommendations based on the Task Force on Roles, Rewards and Evaluation.
At the request of Provost Conway-Turner, the committee will also be looking at faculty mentoring this year.
Planning to follow up on the “idea form” for student evaluations to replace the SOFI. The Provost
noted that they are planning to do a pilot on this in the summer of 2008.
Looking at the faculty salary compression issue and plan to invite the Provost to a meeting to help
explain a few things to the committee.
Old Business
1. The Provost received a response from legal counsel about the confidentiality issue which was raised at the first Executive Committee meeting. She was advised that we cannot legally prevent anyone from taking notes nor can we ask them to surrender or destroy the notes. We can, however, promote confidentiality on campus. The Provost offered to send out a note to departments reminding people of confidentiality issues. FAC will also solicit ideas for enhancing confidentiality.
2. PROPOSAL – Revision of the Term of College Senate Chair
D. Showers gave out copies of the proposal “Revision of the term of the College Senate Chair” and briefly went over the changes proposed and the rationale for each.
M. Lima made the suggestion to have the position of chair run for 2 years instead of 1. D. Showers noted that campuses are split 50/50 on this issue. D. Granger mentioned that it might be harder to attract a chair if the term is for 2 years.
B. Owens recommended the elimination of the Immediate Past Chair position and instead appoint someone to serve on the Strategic Planning Advisory Group. Discussion followed.
D. Granger asked for a vote to present the proposal as written at the All College meeting. The vote
passed unanimously.
3. PROPOSAL – College Senate Secretary
D. Showers supplied copies of the proposal “College Senate Secretary” and briefly noted the duties
that would be assigned to this role, which would alleviate some of the clerical tasks traditionally
performed by the chair.
D. Granger asked for a vote to present the proposal as written at the All College meeting. The vote
passed unanimously.
New business
There was no new business.
Adjournment - 4:59 pm.
Respectfully submitted,
Terry Holbrook
Interim Secretary of the College Senate

University Faculty Senator’s Report


147th Plenary Meeting
Cortland,
October 26th--27th, 2007

It was indeed energizing to hear the keynote address by assembly-woman
Barbara Lifton, a Geneseo alumna (English major), for she spoke of a deep
crisis in this country, identifying a serious decline in democratic
values. Now, even in colleges, Lifton noted, being a consumer is better
than being a citizen. Because democracy requires constant vigilance, she
wants us to harness the power of SUNY faculty to focus on the liberal arts
in order to empower our students for debate, to reclaim our citizenship.
Lifton got a standing ovation.

The presentation by Dr. Muriel Howard, President of Buffalo State College,
on the “Proposal for A Voluntary System of Accountability for Public
Higher Education,” made indeed clear to all of us how students have indeed
become consumers. SUNY campuses are being asked to compete with each
other, in a numbers’ game that benefits no one. In a nutshell, V.S.A. is
a response to the concerns raised by the Spellings Commission
(accountability and transparency, you will remember). It requires each
participating campus to post comparison-enabling data to the web using a
“College Portrait” template with space for, among other things, student
learning assessment data derived from standardized tests. The fact that
most of the senators representing the eight SUNY campuses that have signed
on for the V.S.A. pilot (ESF, Albany, Oneonta, Purchase, Canton,
Cobleskill, Maritime, and Buff State) did not know about it generated an
emergency resolution (text below).

Resolution on the State University and the "Voluntary" System of Accountability

Whereas the University Faculty Senate has indicated through a number of
different resolutions that it opposes the collection and public
distribution of standardized measures assessing student learning outcomes
that would allow for invidious and inappropriate comparisons among SUNY
units, and

Whereas each campus of the State University has an assessment process that
is the result of agreements between that campus and the System
Administration, the singular purpose of which is the improvement of
undergraduate education, and

Whereas the Voluntary Assessment System recently fostered by AASCU and
other educational organizations inappropriately uses such data as
marketing tools rather than for the improvement of undergraduate
education, and


Whereas eight State University campuses have “volunteered” to pilot the

Voluntary System of Accountability with little or no consultation with

local faculty governance bodies,


Therefore,

Be It Resolved that the University Faculty Senate strongly oppose any move

to implement the Voluntary System of Accountability as a State

University-wide requirement.


Be It Further Resolved that the University Faculty Senate urge a

prohibition of additional campus involvement in the pilot process without

explicit and meaningful consultation with local governance bodies.


The resolution passed unanimously.


When I reported on this to our Executive Committee (November 6th meeting),

both the Provost and the President reassured us that “It won’t happen in

Geneseo.” Thus, it may not be necessary for Geneseo to adopt a resolution

on this matter. For additional information on the issue, consult the web

page created by Paul Schacht, Chair of the Academic Program Assessment

Committee:


http://go.geneseo.edu/vsa


To leave a comment on the resolution, log in (upper right) with Geneseo

username and password, then click the “Add Comment” link.


***

Following the report by Buff State President, Patricia Francis addressed

the Plenary to explain some of the benefits of VSA and the 27 campuses

still "eligible for participation." The outrage in the room could not be

silenced. “SUNY has always been about CHOICE,” said one Senator. “VSA

narrows options. Assessment data should be for program use--not for

comparison shopping.

***


Pedro Caban, Vice Provost for Diversity and Educational Equity, spoke

next. He sees diversity not primarily as an issue of increasing the

number of diverse faculty, staff, and students, but diversity as a

comprehensive project. What SUNY needs to do to become one of the most

successful public education systems is aim for epistemic diversity,

embracing the world’s cultures in its curriculum to educate citizens for a

very different world. He considers such diversity central to academic

excellence, a commitment to life-long learning. Caban aims to create a

Center similar to the one Rutgers has (his previous institution), a Center

for the Critical Analysis of Contemporary Culture where faculty will come

together to create an intellectual community in particular areas,

educating each other to truly diversify SUNY. He is thinking of offering

course reductions and other perks for participation.


I consider Caban’s plans particularly relevant now since the Curriculum

Task Force Review has been getting input from everybody on campus before

writing its report. It’s important that we know what SUNY Central is

planning for us as well.


SECTORS’ REPORTS

(1) University Centers:

The problem of transfer students who are not transferring—there is no

universal agreement on how to improve this. Some suggestions were

entrance exams for transfer students; bridge courses; more communication

between professors in community colleges and universities.


(2) University Colleges:

There is a sense of real loss of the concept of consultation and for this

reason less involvement in campus governance.


Another concern was the installation of cameras on campuses for security

reasons after the Critical Incident Management Task Force Report. It is

an issue of privacy and University Senators are to find out what their

campus is doing by meeting with the provost about the report, and bring

answers to the next plenary.


Oneonta is particularly worried about the Presidential search process and

the role of governance on campuses.


Campuses are looking for best practices in Academic Advising, so Geneseo

should volunteer its Task Force Report to help them out.


(3) COLLEGES OF TECHNOLOGY:

Their concern is what they perceive as a lack of understanding in the

system about the role of colleges of technology.


New York State College of Ceramics continues its fight.


Problem with gender diversity in University Senate and in graduate

programs—difficulty attracting women and minorities in both.


(4) CAMPUS GOVERNANCE LEADERS:

for the CGLs—Susan Camp

Work on a template to help new folk involved in governance and make better

use of the listserve


There were 18 CGLs at this plenary, so far the largest number.


Central concern was clerical support/travel/release time for CGLs


merit versus needs-based scholarship


none of the CGLs were consulted about VSA


Reports:

Carl Wiezalis:

Recruitment and retention tool for SUNY faculty—tuition waiver for their

children to attend any SUNY campus.

There will be a survey on perceived value of the measure even if most of

the folk in University Senate are too old to have children.


Best Practices Document in the works about consultation with the faculty

prior to the hiring of an officer


Norm Goodman: for the Executive Committee

Develop training in governance.

The theme for the next two years is “empowering NY in diversity and

education.”

Transfer articulation issues


Graduate Committee—Peter Nickerson

Improve cooperation among SUNY units—asking for best practices

The issue of intellectual property in online materials


Governance Committee—Sharon Cramer

Some campuses are experiencing some challenges in recruiting and retaining

folk for governance. Committee will get some data on participation

Plan to develop some research on the role of governance (and recognition)

in different campuses


Resolution on Endorsement of the University Faculty Senate Consultation

and Visitation Procedure—passed unanimously—text below:


University Faculty Senate

Governance Committee

147th Plenary Meeting

SUNY Cortland

October 27, 2007


Resolution on Endorsement of the University Faculty Senate

Consult and Visitation Procedure


WHEREAS the University Faculty Senate has, for many years, provided a

detailed written protocol providing for the establishment of a visitation

team to be dispatched to a campus following the joint invitation by the

campus president and the local governance leader for the purpose of

providing guidance and assistance in resolving protracted governance

disputes between administration and faculty, and


WHEREAS the Senate has played an important and effective role in resolving

contentious governance situations by lending its expertise and experience,

and


WHEREAS the establishment and utilization of such a protocol clearly lies

within the charge to the University Faculty Senate as the governance body

of the University, and


WHEREAS the members of such visitation teams make important contributions

to the University within the service component of their job

responsibilities, and


Whereas the Governance Committee herewith recommends revisions and

enhancements to the protocol as a result of the most recent visitation to

Alfred State College, and


Now, therefore be it resolved that the University Faculty Senate hereby

adopts this revision to the protocol as the policy of the body to take

effect immediately.


***


Finally, the Governance Committee made official that electronic voting is ok.


Awards Committee—Sandra Michael


Chancellor’s Awards for Excellence change in the guidelines (they will be

for two years now)—and there will be a change in the interval from ten to

five years between awards

Chancellor’s Award for Excellence in Teaching and Distinguished Teaching

Professorship —people need to be teaching to get considered. Effort to

create language to close all loopholes.


Chancellor’s Award for Professional Service—not only for UUP folk

You can be management confidential and earn the award. Some senators

feel that awards to reward administrators are wrong.


Pat Francis is leaving—has been the liaison for the awards with the

provost’s office


Faculty Exchange Program to be re-activated—measure to be tried on the new

chancellor


Undergraduate Committee—Pat Carey

Review of SUNY policy related to credit/contact hour


Guidelines for Internships (booklet)—will be available on the website

Susan Bailey was involved (I have a copy if you want to see it).


Student Life Committee-Ed Felman

Increase the number of mental health providers—recommendation of the

Critical Incident Task Force. Guidelines suggest that funding be provided

for such initiatives. Committee would like to coordinate efforts and

information for best practices report.

Educate faculty and students to identify behavioral risk

Irene Belyakov is in this committee (if you want to know more).


The issues for students are primarily the same:

1. SUNY tuition policy

2. transfer made easier

3. increase in campus safety


Operations Committee—Joe for Maureen Dolan

Resolution on a Comprehensive SUNY Digital Library has been endorsed by

the SUNY Librarians Association. See below


Resolution in Support of Proposal for a Comprehensive SUNY Digital Library


Submitted by the Operations Committee


University Faculty Senate

Fall Plenary Meeting

October 25-28, 2007


Preamble:


At its 2006 Fall Plenary Meeting, the University Faculty Senate adopted

the following resolution [on Enhancing SUNY Access to Electronic

databases]:


“Therefore Be it resolved, that in order to more adequately support the

teaching and research needs of SUNY students and faculty, the University

Faculty Senate recommends that SUNY institutions and the SUNY Provost,

working together, give priority to developing both a strategy and funding

mechanism to provide greater SUNY-wide access to a broader range of

scholarly databases and other electronic resources than those currently

available.”


In August 2007, the SUNY Council of Library Directors and the SUNYConnect

Advisory Council submitted to SUNY administration a document entitled

Proposal for a Comprehensive SUNY Digital Library (see attached). The

University Faculty Senate Operations Committee has reviewed the Proposal

and believes that it provides a good strategy for increasing access within

SUNY to electronic scholarly resources. The Operations Committee accepts

that the suggested funding mechanism is reasonable while noting with

regret that library expenditures within SUNY remain inadequate to move

SUNY libraries to the front ranks of their national peers.


Resolution:


Whereas, at its 2007 Fall Plenary Meeting, the University Faculty Senate

adopted a resolution recommending that “SUNY institutions and the SUNY

Provost, working together, give priority to developing both a strategy and

funding mechanism to provide greater SUNY-wide access to a broader range

of scholarly databases and other electronic resources than those currently

available.”; and


Whereas, the SUNY Council of Library Directors and the SUNYConnect

Advisory Council have submitted their Proposal for a Comprehensive SUNY

Digital Library to the SUNY Chancellor and the SUNY Provost; and


Whereas, the University Faculty Senate finds that the Proposal for a

Comprehensive SUNY Digital Library sets out an effective strategy for

increasing System-wide access to scholarly electronic resources;


Therefore Be it resolved that, the University Faculty Senate recommends

the implementation of and provision of funding for the SUNY Digital

Library as outlined in the Proposal for a Comprehensive SUNY Digital

Library.


Respectfully submitted,


Maria Helena Lima

November 13, 2007


Results of Fall 2007 Special Election


General Education Committee, Fine Arts

Melanie Blood


General Education Committee, Humanities

Stacey Edgar


General Education Committee, Social Sciences

Ren Vasiliev


Professional Leave Review Committee, Humanities

Michael Oberg


Professional Leave Review Committee, Natural Sciences

Harold Hoops


University Faculty Senator Alternate

Sherry Schwartz



Call For Honors Course Proposals


Dear Faculty,


The College Honors Program is seeking proposals for the Fall 2008 semester.

We will be offering three 200-level courses. The courses are:


F/HONR 204: Honors Seminar in the Fine Arts: (subtitle)

S/HONR 203: Honors Seminar in the Social Sciences: (subtitle)

HONR 206: Honors Seminar: (subtitle)


The last course listed, HONR 206, can be in any area. We are

especially interested in topics that are interdisciplinary in nature

but we do not preclude mono-disciplinary proposals. Students in the

program expressed an interest in non-western humanities and courses

that address current issues.


Honors courses should be thought of as ideal core offerings. They

should be designed for non-majors and thus carry no pre-requisites.

We would like them to be discussion driven. The students will expect

to be challenged, but not overwhelmed.


We would like the proposals to be returned to us at

mailto:honors@geneseo.edu>honors@geneseo.edu by February 1, 2008.


Please contact us by phone or email with any questions or comments.


Thanks for you continuing support.


Ron Herzman (X5265) and Olympia Nicodemi (X5390)


Dr. Olympia Nicodemi

Department of Mathematics

325B South Hall

SUNY Geneseo

Geneseo NY 14454


Tel: 585 245 5390

Fax: 585 245 5128