College Senate Bulletin

State University of New York at Geneseo

College of Arts and Sciences

 

Correspondence to Dennis Showers, School of Education, South 222C, showers@geneseo.edu, 245-5264

Note: Page numbers indicate pages as per the paper copy of the Bulletins.

 

Bulletin No.9

 

Bulletin No. 9

Pages 115-145

April 1, 2008

 

Contents

Page Topic

Page Topic

116 Agenda: Senate Meeting of April 8, 2008

117 Minutes of the All College Meeting of February 19, 2008

119 Minutes of the Senate Meeting of February 19, 2008

123 Minutes of the Senate Meeting of March 11, 2008

129 Minutes of the Executive Committee Meeting of January 29, 2008

133 Minutes of the Executive Committee Meeting of February 26, 2008

136 Minutes of the Undergraduate Curriculum Committee Meeting of

March 4, 2008

138 Minutes of the Undergraduate Policy Committee Meeting of

March 25, 2008

139 Minutes of the Graduate Academic Affairs Meeting of April 1, 2008

140 Revised Minutes of the Faculty Affairs Committee Meeting of

February 5, 2008

142 UCC: Descriptions of Proposed Course Changes for Senate Consideration 4/8/08

144 UPC: Policy Proposal Regarding GPA Requirement for Senate Consideration 4/8/08

145 GAA: Description of Proposed Course and Program Changes for Senate Consideration 4/8/08

 

 

 

 

 

Agenda for the Senate Meeting of April 8, 2008

Call to Order

Adoption of the Agenda

Adoption of the All-College Minutes of Feb.19, 2008 (p.117)

Adoption of the Senate Meeting Minutes of Feb.19, 2008 (p.119)

Adoption of the Senate Meeting Minutes of March 11, 2008 (p.123)

UFS Sustainability Conference Presentation

Senate Reports

President Christopher Dahl

Provost Kate Conway-Turner

Chair David Granger

Vice Chair Dennis Showers

Past-Chair Dennis Showers

Treasurer Linda Ware

University Faculty Senator Maria Lima

Vice President, Student Assoc. Jarah Magan

 

Reports of the Standing Committees of the Senate

Undergraduate Curricula Robert Owens

UCC Proposes for First Reading

New courses (p.142)

Comn 379, Communication: Integrated Applications

Geog 230, Biogeography

GSci 335, Global climate Change

Hist 358, Black Power and Structural Inequality in post-1945

 

Course revisions (p.143)

Chem 324

Educ 354, Family and Community

Hist 267, Women and U.S. Social Movements

 

Revision of Major (p.143)

B.A. in Political Science and International Relations

B.S. in Childhood Education with Special Education

B.S. in Childhood Education

B.S. in Early Childhood and Childhood Education

 

Revision of Minor (p.144)

Asian Studies

UCC Proposes for Second Reading

New course (Bulletin #8, p.109)

Thea 224, Acting Techniques: (Subtitle)

 

Course revision (Bulletin #8, p.109)

PlSc 327, Terrorism and National Security

 

Course deletions (Bulletin #8, p.109)

Comm 135, Introduction to communication Theory

Hist 252, African-American History Since Reconstruction

Hist 255, The Frontier Experience

Hist 269, Mini:

Hist 389, Honors Research/Writing

Thea 220, Speech in Theatre

Thea 240, Stage management

 

Revision of Majors (Bulletin #8, p.110)

B.A. in Communication

B.A. in Theater

B.S in BioChemistry

B.S. in Biophysics

 

Revision of Minor (Bulletin #8, p.110)

Human Development Minor

 

Revision of Concentration (Bulletin #8, p.110)

Women’s Studies

Concentration in Mathematics for BA in Education


Undergraduate Policies Ed Wallace

UPC Proposal Regarding Syllabus Distribution Policy--Second Reading (Bulletin #8, p.111)

UPC Proposal Regarding GPA Requirement—First Reading (p.144)


Graduate Academic Affairs Susan Salmon

GAA Proposes for First Reading

Course revision (p.145)

Curr 512, Diagnosis and Assessment in Reading and Literacy

 

Program revision (p.145)

Masters in Literacy B-12

 

Program deletion (p.145)

Masters in Literacy 5-12

 

 

Student Affairs Denise Scott

 

 Faculty Affairs Joan Zook

 

Old Business

New Business

Adjournment

 

 

All College Senate Minutes

19 February 2008

 

Present: D. Aagesen, J. Andrews, S. Bailey, D. Baldwin, T. Bazzett, R. Bonfiglio, C. Brown, S. Chen, J. Chester, R. Coloccia, K. Conway-Turner, J. Cope, C. Dahl, R. Doggett, J. Dolce, A. Eisenberg, C. Garrity, E. Gillin, S. Giorgis, B. Gohlman, D. Granger (Chair), E. Hall, M. Harrigan, W. Harrison, G. Hartvigsen, K. Henning, A. Herman, J. Johannes, K. Keegan, T. Kenney, M. Klotz, R. Lang, C. Leary, K. Levison, B. Lewis, M. Lima, J. Lovett, D. Mackenzie, P. MacLean, J. Magan, C. Matthews, R. McKnight, J. McLean, B. Morgan, J. Morse, L. O'Brien, B. Owens, P. Pacheco, T. Paradis, D. Raynor, C. Ross, S. Salmon, S. Schwartz, D. Scott, B. See, F. Sheikh, A. Sheldon, D. Showers, H. C. Tesler, H. Waddy, E. Wallace, L. Ware, A. Weibel, B. Welker, J. Williams, J. Wisniewski, J. Zook

 

Guests: K. Gentry, B. McCoy, K. Muller

 

Call to Order

Chair Granger called the All College Senate meeting to order at 4:00 pm

 

Adoption of the Agenda

The agenda (College Senate Bulletin #7, page 95) was adopted unanimously without corrections or additions.

 

Teach-In Presentation – Beth McCoy

McCoy thanked the Senate for the opportunity to speak at the All College meeting and provided a handout and reviewed the plans for the March 9, 2008 Race and Campus Culture Teach-In schedule. She explained that the concept began last summer as a grass roots effort to educate Geneseo about the structural inequality and the personal affects of those inequalities that affect our community members both inside and outside of the classroom. McCoy asked faculty members to encourage student participation and to join them at the March 9th Teach-In. She suggested offering extra-credit projects in classes, especially those that do not on the surface seem to deal with the issues of the Teach-In.

 

McCoy concluded by inviting the whole campus to the Teach-In on March 9, 2008.

 

For more information, visit http://www.geneseo.edu/diversity/race_culture

 

Nominations Committee Report:

Bill Gohlman stated that his nomination report was bleak. He asked members present to consider seeking an office and also to reach out to fellow faculty and staff members and encourage them to run for offices. Gohlman reviewed the slate to be filled:

Presentation of Nominees for Senate

  • Vice Chair

  • Treasurer

  • Secretary – Nominee: Brian Morgan

Presentation of Nominees for Senate At-Large Representatives

  • Over 6 Years – 4 nominees

  • 1-6 Years – 2 nominees

Presentation of Nominees for Senate Part-Time Representatives

Presentation of Nominees for the General Education Committee

Presentation of Nominees for the Professional Leave Review Committee

Presentation of Nominees for Committee on Nominations – Nominee: Jan Lovett

 

D. Granger made a call for additional nominations and referred members to page 93 of College Senate Bulletin, #6 for clarification of the roles of the positions. He reminded everyone of the newly created positions for part-time faculty and encouraged members to seek nominations within their departments.

 

D. Granger asked that additional nominees be sent to both he and Bill Gohlman. He also asked current officers to consider running for another term.

Old Business

No old business

New Business

No new business

Adjournment

The All College Senate meeting was adjourned at 4:14 pm.

 

Respectfully submitted,

 

Connie Hurlburt

Recording Secretary to the Senate


College Senate Meeting

19 February 2008

Call to Order

Chair Granger called the All College Senate meeting to order at 4:15 pm

 

Adoption of the Agenda

Chair Granger called for an amendment to the Agenda as published in College Senate Bulletin, #7 (pages 95-96) to add a GAA Committee new graduate course for first reading (description appeared in Bulletin but item not on agenda). No objections were voiced and the agenda was unanimously passed with the amendment.

 

Adoption of the College Senate Minutes of November 20, 2007 (College Senate Bulletin #6, pages 76-82)Unanimously approved.

 

Adoption of the College Senate Minutes of December 4, 2007 (College Senate Bulletin, #6, pages 86-90) – Unanimously approved.

 

Senate Reports:

 

President’s Report

 

President Dahl referred everyone to his report given at the December 4, 2007 College Senate meeting and noted in the minutes (College Senate Bulletin, # 6). He reviewed the SUNY Trustees Budget request.

 

Dahl acknowledged being pleased with SUNY Geneseo being named in Kiplinger’s Personal Finance magazine as number one best value among the nation’s public colleges for out-of-state students, and number six for in-state students. Anyone wishing a pdf copy of the report should call the President’s Office.

 

March 9th Teach-In on Race and Campus Culture – President Dahl commended the organizing committee that has been working since last summer to put this event together. The Teach-In will provide the campus with an outstanding educational opportunity – including critical thinking and dialogue ­– and he joined the committee in charging everyone to participate.

 

Commission on Higher Education – Highlights and concerns:

  • Good report for SUNY and Geneseo. The current Administration and the Commission understand the importance of public higher education in the State of New York.

  • Persistent underfunding – backlog of critical maintenance and critical capital projects.

  • Calls for a $3 billion dollar research fund (over 5 years) – monies have yet to come to fruition.

  • Stresses 2,000 new faculty for SUNY and CUNY (over a 3-5 year period) to accommodate better student/faculty ratio.

  • Stresses regulatory relief – approval from Albany (from curriculum to purchasing) – as we are overregulated and require too much prior approval.

  • No flexibility in setting tuition – need for variable campus tuition and regulatory.

  • We cannot manage our own construction projects.

  • Flagship campuses needed – research universities (SUNY Buffalo and Stony Brook) mentioned but left door open for a flagship public undergraduate liberal arts college (we know which one that is!).

  • Need for seamless transfer between SUNY (two and four year) campuses.

  • Need to establish education partnership with key in high need school districts with SUNY campuses.

President Dahl concluded by stating that he found the intention of the report encouraging. It challenges SUNY to reach for excellence and its recommendations for further support are all to the good.

 

State Budget –

 

President Dahl opened by observing that Governor Spitzer is supportive of SUNY and is saying the best things about SUNY and CUNY that haven’t been heard since the days of Nelson Rockefeller. He again expressed his appreciation for Geneseo being prominently mentioned in the upstate version of the Governor’s State-to-State report and the Commission on Higher Education report! He then reminded us that the wonderful reports have now met the realities of New York State economy and its effect on the state budget—an emerging shortfall in revenues for next year of $4.38 billion (later revised upwards to about 5 billion dollars for next year). This will present challenges for us.

 

Dahl reviewed the SUNY Trustees’ budget requests and compared them with the Executive Budget proposed by in the Governor’s Budget Message:

Base Level – Required Funding

SUNY requested $64.8 million dollars for mandatory funding for salary & OTPS (Other than Personnel Services), Enrollment, and Empire Innovation

Governor’s Budget proposes $26.3 million dollars for salary & OTPS

Initiatives

SUNY requested $116.7 million dollars for additional faculty, access/diversity, research, safety/security, tuition increase and other.

Governor’s Budget proposes no funding.

Executive Changes (in millions)

Base Level­– $26,301

Initiatives – 0

Reduce Energy Funding – minus $23,377

2.5% Reduction – minus $29,990

Remove Legislative items – minus $6,235

  • NET RECOMMENDATION ­– minus $33,301

Recommended State Tax-Dollar Support

2007 ­- 2008 Adjusted = $1,173.289

Base Level Increase = $26,301

Executive Changes = minus $33,301

  • 2008-2009 Total = $1,139,988

 

Dahl noted that this leaves SUNY with a net budget cut against the revised FY08 base of some $34 million.

 

Dahl then moved to the capital budget and compared the SUNY requests with the Governor’s recommendations in the Executive Budget.

Capital Program SUNY Request vs. Executive Budget

Critical Maintenance (5 years) = $3.75, vs. $2.75 billion in Executive Budge

Strategic Initiates = $2.5 billion, vs. $1.612 billion in Executive Budget

SUNY Greening Initiatives = $ 542 million, vs. $75 million

Lump Serve Reserve = $1.0 billion requested; no funds granted.

 

Under the proposed budget, Geneseo would receive about two-thirds of the $99 million requested in critical maintenance.

 

Dahl commented that the capital budget is quite good, especially in a bad budget year. If approved, it will be the largest five-year SUNY capital plan that has ever been put into place. On the operating budget side, however, he again emphasized the need to restore funding.

 

A SUNY Day delegation – including ­students Brendan Quinn, Jarah Magan and Andrew Reiser – will be traveling to Albany to talk with legislators and members of the Commission on Higher Education, and perhaps the Governor’s Office, advocating for SUNY budget restorations and supporting the Governor’s endowment proposal.

Provost’s Report

Provost Conway-Turner reported that the College’s use of Angel as our Learning Management System has been very successful. She stated that in the first semester, 45% of faculty are using the system as well as benefiting students. She expects participation to grow over the next semester.

 

The Provost announced that the TLC and Counseling Center have been meeting and discussing critical events in the media ­– the most recent being the tragedy at Northern Illinois University. They will be hosting a series of workshops during the 2008 calendar year to provide faculty with the appropriate tools in addressing such topics as what behaviors to look for, how to intervene, etc. Spring workshops dates: February 28 (1:30 – 3:00 pm); March 25 (1:30 – 2:45 pm), and April 9 (1:30 – 2:45 pm). Each workshop will accommodate 25 participants and an invitation from the Provost will be forthcoming. She promised that there will be sufficient workshops to accommodate all faculty and that they will continue into the next academic year.

 

The Provost reported that in a collaborative effort, the College and OMRDD will be working on the Learning Independence, Vocational and Educational Skills (LIVES) program to bring some of their students to campus. Tabitha Buggie-Hunt and Liz Hall expect to have about six students doing workshops next fall, and staff should expect to see these students around campus, in the library, etc.

 

Chair’s Report

Paperless distribution of College Senate Bulletins – Chair Granger announced that beginning with College Senate Bulletin, #8, the bulletin will be distributed in an electronic form only. Anyone wishing to receive a paper copy should contact to Jennifer Perry (Provost’s Office; perryj@geneseo.edu; 245-5531).

 

Call for nominations for the Richard Roark Award – Granger called for nominations (as noted in College Senate Bulletin, #7). Please submit nominations to Granger by April 17, 2008.

 

SUNY Faculty Senate Winter Plenary Meeting (Albany, February 2008) – Granger announced the resolution pertaining to VSA and reiterated that Geneseo does not plan to participate.

 

Vice Chair’s Report

 

Excellence Awards and Distinguished Ranks Committee – Showers announced that the committee’s recommendations have been sent to the President for his action. Showers thanked the committee for its hard work. President Dahl also commended the committee for its excellent work and noted that all nominations were approved and sent forward to Albany.

 

Past-Chair’s Report – D. Showers

No report

 

Treasurer’s Report

    Ware reported a balance of $1,272.32 in the College Senate account and noted the dramatic increase over past years.

     

Ware appealed for more donations.

 

Ware will provide forms for tax purposes, if requested.

 

University Faculty Senator’s Report

 

M. Lima reviewed her University Faculty Senator’s Report (College Senate Bulletin #7, pages 99-104) pertaining to the 148th Plenary Meeting of February 1, 2008.

 

Vice President, Student Assoc. – Jarah Magan

 

No report


Reports of the Standing Committees of the Senate

 

Undergraduate Curricula – Robert Owens

 

UCC Proposes for First Reading

New courses (Listed on page 96)

Anth 236, Forensic Anthropology

Psyc 278, Psychology of Happiness

Psyc 280, Sport and Exercise psychology

No discussion, the motion passed unanimously.

 

Course deletions (Listed on pages 96-97)

Acct 396, Small Business Institute Seminar

Econ 105, S/Government & The Economy

Econ 396, Small Business Institute Seminar

Educ 100, College Reading Techniques

Educ 305, Philosophy of Education

Educ 321, Audio-Visual Appr to Learning

Educ 322, Teaching of Elementary School Math

Educ 341, Methodological App-Soc Sci Educ

Educ 372, Educ Measurement & Evaluation

GSci 371, Geology Field Study

H&PE 102, Beginning Swimming

H&PE 133, Volleyball

H&PE 137, Water Polo

H&PE 139, Team Handball

H&PE 227, Advanced Golf

H&PE 244, Adv Figure Skating

H&PE 246, Adv Downhill Skiing

Hist 247, Fascism & World War II: 1919-45

Hist 283, US World & Vietnam:1954-75

Intd 225, Intro to Cognitive Science

Mgmt 396, Small Business Institute Seminar

Sped 268, Manual Comm & Instr Strategies

 

Following a brief discussion, Jane Morse moved and D. Showers seconded the motion to accept the first reading of all the proposed course deletions with the exception of Educ. 305, which will be taught in Fall 2008. The motion (without Educ 305) was passed unanimously.

 

Owens asked members to discuss with their departments any proposed course deletions and report back to him with concerns.

 

The Undergraduate Curricula Committee will meet next on March 4, 2008 at 4:00 pm in Sturges 405.

 

Undergraduate Policies – Ed Wallace

Wallace had no formal report at this time but plans to bring forth a motion at the March meeting.

Graduate Academic Affairs – Susan Salmon

Salmon presented course approval for first reading: CSCD 449: Speech and Language Disorder in Diverse Populations (College Senate Bulletin #7, page 97).

 

Following a brief discussion, the first reading was approved unanimously.

 

Student Affairs – Denise Scott

No report

 

Faculty Affairs – Joan Zook

  1. Provost Conway-Turner attended the meeting of February 5, 2008 to answer questions about salary adjustments and how they occurred. Minutes will appear in the next bulletin.

  2. Next meeting on March 4, 2008 regarding advising issues.

Old Business

No old business

New Business

No new business

Adjournment

Chair Granger adjourned the meeting at 5:08 pm

 

Respectfully submitted,

 

Connie Hurlburt

Recording Secretary to the College Senate

 

 

College Senate Meeting

11 March 2008

Present: D. Aagesen, L. Argentieri, S. Bailey, T. Bazzett, L. Blackman, C. Brown, J. Chester, R. Coloccia, K. Conway-Turner, J. Cope, C. Dahl, C. Garrity, E. Gillin, S. Giorgis, B. Gohlman, D. Granger (Chair), E. Hall, M. Harrigan, W. Harrison, G. Hartvigsen, J. Johannes, T. Kenney, M. Klotz, C. Leary, K. Lemischak, D. Mackenzie, P. MacLean, J. Magan, C. Matthews, J. McLean, J. Morse, L. O'Brien, B. Owens, P. Pacheco, T. Paradis, J. Parent, D. Raynor, B. Reilly, S. Salmon, S. Schwartz, D. Scott, D. Showers, A. Sheldon, A. Stanley, M. Stolee, C. Tesler, H. Waddy, E. Wallace, L. Ware, B. Welker, J. Williams, J. Zook

 

Guests: J. Bulsys, K. Miller

 

Call to Order

Chair Granger called the meeting to order at 4:05 pm

 

Adoption of the Agenda

The Agenda of the March 11, 2008 meeting (College Senate Bulletin #8, page 108-109) was presented with one change – Sustainability Conference Presentation will be a short report today with a full presentation at the next College Senate Meeting. The amended agenda was passed unanimously.

 

University Faculty Senate Sustainability Conference Report

Leigh O’Brien reported that the five members (including one student) of the Environmental Impact Task Force attended the SUNY Sustainability Conference in November 2007. They have been building their work from there in conjunction with the recently signed Presidents’ Climate Commitment. As time did not permit completion of the work, the task force will make a presentation at the next College Senate Meeting tying the conference with the work of the task force.

 

Senate Reports:

 

President’s Report

President Dahl reported:

 

Teach-In on Race and Campus Climate – The President expressed his thanks for the more than 350 students, faculty and staff who participated in the very successful Teach-In and recognized the organizers and facilitators for their efforts. Dahl stated that he had found the program to be productive and expects that there will be additional follow-up on the subject in the near future.

 

State Budget and State politics – sequentially from SUNY Day to today!

President Dahl expressed his appreciation to Jarah Magan, Brendan Quinn, and Andrew Reiser from the Student Association for their participation at SUNY Day, along with Jim Milroy (Director of the Budget) and Bob Wayland-Smith (our College Council Chair). He found the visit very successful – meeting with at least 15 legislators and with the chair and chief counsel of the Governor’s Commission on Higher Education. He expressed appreciation for good conversations concerning not only the need for graduate flagships, but also one or more undergraduate flagships and found that many of the legislators, and especially the staff of the Higher Education Commission, were interested in the concept of an undergraduate flagship. He expected to continue working on this topic with the Governor’s senior aides--this was something that he and Governor Spitzer had discussed during the Governor’s recent visit to Geneseo while he toured the Integrated Science Center.

SUNY Day – During the Albany trip the Geneseo contingent attempted to garner support from both houses for a series of member item requests ranging from:

  • scientific equipment for Physics and Astronomy

  • telescope dome for the Integrated Science Center

  • support for an innovative program – LIVES – to bring developmentally disabled students here, not as matriculated students but as full participants in our academic community with opportunities for service-learning and mentoring by our students in special education

  • support for minority and women owned businesses we work in the South Wedge of Rochester and through the Klainer Center for Women and Business.

  • Rochester Young Scholars Academy, which brings middle school students from Northeast Rochester to Geneseo for a residential program

 

President Dahl stressed that during the visit they were very active in attempting to get funds for individual member items, as well as advocating for $7.6 million dollars in targeted funding for Geneseo to lower the student/faculty ratio from 19:1 to 15:1. They also urged restoration of the $34 million in cuts to the SUNY operating budget and full support for the capital program, which would provide us with crucial building renovations, new facilities, and a new stadium. Dahl stressed that this was one of the best SUNY Days from his standpoint.

 

Since February 26th, signs have been positive from the legislature. It appears that the Assembly is about the pass a one-house budget bill that would restore the $34 million in cuts and would also probably support the capital program. The Senate is also expected to restore the 2.5% cuts, but is less specific about what it might do with the capital projects.

 

The relatively rosy picture presented at the time of the Governor’s visit last Wednesday has shifted radically in less than a week. It now appears, as everyone is aware, that the Governor may resign. Certainly, almost every issue pending in state government is in doubt. Dahl offered no predictions and stated that it is not his position to comment on the Governor’s situation or to speculate on what will happen next. He did offer two observations, however:

 

If the Governor were to resign, Lt. Gov. David Paterson would succeed him, under NY State constitution. Patterson was the 2007 commencement speaker at Geneseo and Dahl commended him for being a very interesting and able legislator. If he were to succeed Spitzer, we would be working with someone who knows and likes this campus – and higher education in general.

 

Dahl observed that there are personalities in government but there are also ideas, programs and initiatives. Geneseo’s ability to contribute to strengthening the SUNY system remains, regardless of who is in the Governor’s Office. The College will continue working for the resources we need to achieve the full potential of our mission—to be an undergraduate flagship in SUNY and a national model of public liberal arts education. We have been presenting our needs and vision of what we could do even better for the state and for SUNY, not only to the governor but also to both houses of the legislature. Geneseo will continue moving forward at a time of great uncertainty—and unprecedented strangeness—in New York State politics.

 

Provost ‘s Report

Provost Conway-Turner reported:

 

G.R.E.A.T. Day – Provost Conway-Turner reminded everyone of G.R.E.A.T. Day events (April 22, 2008) and expects another wonderful day. She asked everyone to encourage student participation. The deadline for student proposals is Friday, March 14, 2008.

 

Curriculum Task Force – Conway-Turner is pleased with the ongoing work of the Curriculum Task Force and announced that she asked Senate members serving on the Curriculum Task Force to update the Senate on their work as part of her announcements. Bob Owens provided the following update.

 

Senator Owens reported that the task force has been meeting since January 2007 and expects its work to continue well in the next academic year. It has been discussing ideas, listening to faculty, students and staff in open forums and corresponding with various interested parties. He encouraged everyone to keep up with that process. Highlights were:

  • No concrete proposals, but the Task Force continues to welcome input.

  • Wresting with several ideas gleaned from looking at other universities.

  • Looking at our goals for a Geneseo education.

 

The Task Force began with looking at:

 

  • What kind of a student would we like to have graduate from Geneseo?

  • What does a degree from a public, liberal arts college mean?

  • Institutional and curricular goals, to decide if they coincide with each other. Discussion continues.

  • Interdisciplinary majors and minors, bringing forth a couple ideas.

  • Reframing General Education (Gen Ed). Will consider influence it has on a Geneseo student and being mindful of a constant changing world and equipping students with what they will need for the rest of the century.

  • Relationship between Gen Ed and the majors programs.

  • Nature of the Institution – Do we have different goals for our students to meet because we are a public liberal arts institution (regarding, e.g., service-learning and our diverse world)?

 

Owens concluded his report by inviting suggestions and ideas from other senators via email to the Curriculum Task Force.

 

Jeff Johannes asked if the minutes could be found on the website? Provost Conway-Turner responded that they can be found via the Provost’s webpage.

 

Chair’s Report

Chair Granger reported:

Like the President and Provost, D. Granger was very happy to see the excellent turnout at the Teach-in on Sunday. In particular, he noted MANY senators–students, faculty, and administrative staff–and senate officers in attendance and also serving as facilitators, allies, etc.

 

Granger asked members to please remember that nominations are now being accepted for the Roark Award. He sent an email a couple of weeks ago with all of the details and he will send a reminder sometime in the next few days. He expressed his hope to see some nominations coming in very soon and reminded everyone of the April 17, 2008 deadline.

 

Granger reminded everyone of the SPRING ELECTION: We still need nominees for the following:

  • Vice Chair: Please talk to folks in your departments. People who have received Chancellor’s Awards and/or Distinguished Ranks would be particularly good candidates, though that’s not a necessity.

  • We still have only one nominee for the Committee on Nominations ­– we need to fill three total positions.

  • We still need a couple more nominees each for Senator under six years and over six years.

  • We currently have no nominees for part-timers – two positions to fill.

  • We still need an SOE/CDSC nominee for Professional Leave Review. The person does not have to have had leave in the past.

 

Vice-Chair’s Report

Dennis Showers – no report.

 

Past-Chair’s Report

Dennis Showers – no report.

 

Treasurer’s Report

Linda Ware reported:

  • Still receiving contributions.

  • Not expending any funds at this time.

  • Ware continues to welcome any contributions.

 

University Faculty Senator’s Report

M. Lima away and unable to attend – no report.

 

Vice President, Student Association

Jarah Magan reported that S.A. ballots have been finalized and she expects to bring the new Vice President of the Student Association to the next Senate meeting.

 

Reports of the Standing Committees of the Senate

 

Undergraduate Curriculum

Chair B. Owens proposed:

UCC Proposes for First Reading

New course (Listed on page 109)

Thea 224, Acting Techniques: (Subtitle)

No discussion – unanimously approved.

 

Course revision (Listed on page 109)

PlSc 327, Terrorism and National Security

No discussion – unanimously approved.

 

Course deletions (Listed on page 109)

Comm 135, Introduction to communication Theory

Hist 252, African-American History Since Reconstruction

Hist 255, The Frontier Experience

Hist 269, Mini: (subtitle)

Hist 389, Honors Research/Writing

Thea 220, Speech in Theatre

Thea 240, Stage Movement

No discussion – unanimously approved.

 

Revision of Majors (Listed on page 110)

B.A. in Communication

No discussion – unanimously approved.

B.A. in Theater

No discussion – unanimously approved.

B.S in BioChemistry

No discussion – unanimously approved.

B.S. in Biophysics

No discussion – unanimously approved.

 

Revision of Minor (Listed on page 110)

Human Development Minor

No discussion – unanimously approved.

 

Revision of Concentration (Listed on page 110)

Women’s Studies

Concentration in Mathematics for BA in Education

No discussion – unanimously approved.

 

UCC Proposes for Second Reading

New courses (Bulletin #7, p.96)

Anth 236, Forensic Anthropology

Psyc 278, Psychology of Happiness

Psyc 280, Sport and Exercise psychology

No discussion – unanimously approved.

 

Course deletions (Bulletin #7, pp.96-97)

Acct 396, Small Business Institute Seminar

Econ 105, S/Government & The Economy

Econ 396, Small Business Institute Seminar

Educ 100, College Reading Techniques

Educ 321, Audio-Visual Appr to Learning

Educ 322, Teaching of Elementary School Math

Educ 341, Methodological App-Soc Sci Educ

Educ 372, Educ Measurement & Evaluation

GSci 371, Geology Field Study

H&PE 102, Beginning Swimming

H&PE 133, Volleyball

H&PE 137, Water Polo

H&PE 139, Team Handball

H&PE 227, Advanced Golf

H&PE 244, Adv Figure Skating

H&PE 246, Adv Downhill Skiing

Hist 247, Fascism & World War II: 1919-45

Hist 283, US World & Vietnam:1954-75

Intd 225, Intro to Cognitive Science

Mgmt 396, Small Business Institute Seminar

Sped 268, Manual Comm & Instr Strategies

 

Scott Giorgis – requested the removal of GSci 371 – UCC accepted as a friendly motion – unanimously approved with change.

 

Undergraduate Policies

Chair E. Wallace reported:

 

UPC Proposal Regarding Syllabus Distribution Policy--First Reading (p.111)

Syllabus Distribution Policy –

The Undergraduate Policies Committee was asked by the Sustainability Committee to review the Syllabus Distribution Policy. He shared that the Committee did not want to take paper copies from students who wanted paper copies and also did not want to impose the necessity of printing on students. Following discussion, the Committee proposed adding two things to the current policy:

 

  1. Instructor will provide either paper copy or an electronic version

  2. Students who request a paper copy of the syllabus will be provided with one by the instructor

 

If no one wants a paper copy then paper will be saved.

 

Chris Leary (Math Dept) asked if an archival copy will be kept in each department and the Provost clarified that this was a different issue – there will be no change in that policy.

 

The Undergraduate Policies Committee offered the following as a motion for first reading to replace the current syllabus distribution policy:

 

Syllabus

Each faculty member is required to prepare for each course an outline (or syllabus) subject to reasonable changes as circumstances demand, which will contain the following information and will be made available (as either a paper copy or an electronic version) to the students during the first week of the semester:

 

1. an outline of the sequence of the course and the topics to be covered in the course;

2. a reading list, texts, and/or materials required;

3. grading procedures;

4. test dates including date and time of the final examination;

5. schedules for assignments, experiments, and projects;

6. descriptions and due dates of papers the student will write for the course.

 

Students who request a paper copy of the syllabus will be provided with one by the instructor.

 

Copies of the course outline shall also be placed in department files." See also Academic Affairs, Section XII of Policies and Procedures.

 

First reading – unanimously approved.

 

Graduate Academic Affairs

Chair S. Salmon reported:

 

GCC Proposes for Second Reading

New course (Bulletin #7, p.97)

CDSC 449: Speech and Language Disorders in Diverse Populations

No discussion – unanimously approved.

Student Affairs

Denise Scott ­– no report. Next committee meeting to be held on April 1, 2008.

 

Faculty Affairs

Chair J. Zook reported:

 

  • Committee met last week on March 3, 2008.

  • Committee continues discussing Form H revisions – specifically recommendations by the Task Force on Faculty Evaluation, Roles and Rewards. While no new conclusions have been reached, the committee continues working on ideas.

  • Next committee meeting April 1, 2008.

 

Old Business

No old business

 

New Business

No new business

 

Adjournment

Chair Granger adjourned the meeting at 4:35 pm

 

Respectfully submitted,

 

Connie Hurlburt

Recording Secretary to the College Senate

 

 

 

Executive Committee Meeting Minutes

29 January 2008

 

Present: Provost Conway-Turner, President Dahl, D. Granger (Chair), M. Lima, B. Owens, D. Showers, S. Salmon, E. Wallace, J. Zook

Call to Order

Chair Granger called the meeting to order at 4:02 pm

 

Adoption of the Agenda

The agenda was adopted unanimously without additions or corrections.

 

Adoption of the Minutes of Nov.27, 2007

The Executive Committee minutes of November 27, 2007 were approved unanimously.

 

Reports

 

President’s Report

President Dahl reported:

 

Teach-In on Race and Campus Culture – President Dahl commended Beth McCoy and the organizing committee for their continuing efforts in the planning process for the March 9, 2008 Teach-In and reviewed the great resources being made available. He encouraged everyone to check out the information on the Diversity webpage and to participate.

 

Commission on Higher Education – Dahl shared highlights and concerns:

  • Inadequate funding for Geneseo

  • Geneseo mentioned in the opening as a model

  • Student/faculty ratio

  • Need more support

  • Professional programs

  • Archaic bidding process (SUNY and SED approval)

 

President Dahl also noted that the report projects:

  • Variable based campus tuition

  • Differential missions for campuses

 

Dahl stated that the Commission would like to create two graduate flagships (Buffalo and Stony Brook). He expressed his opinion that there is a role for a flagship undergraduate campus that can demonstrate how to “do it right” in liberal education in the 21st century. Geneseo is prepared to be that campus, for a very modest cost to the state and system. Dahl noted that Geneseo was one of only three undergraduate campuses (along with Purchase and the Fashion Institute of Technology) singled out for mention in the report. As always, resources remain a problem for achieving our main goal: reducing our student/faculty ratio from the current 19:1 ratio to 15:1 or less. We also need targeted support for our distinctive liberal arts mission (service learning, undergraduate research, international study, professional programs embedded in a liberal arts program, etc.). Geneseo needs increased funding to reflect the reputation we have already achieved as an outstanding public liberal arts college.

 

Dahl noted the report’s recommendation of a $3 billion dollar research fund to be made available to both public and private institutions—a powerful economic development tool. The report also stresses transferability of credits, which may be problematic for campuses like Geneseo and Binghamton, but Dahl indicated that our campuses already take significant numbers of transfer students and could probably work with the system to resolve any perceived difficulties. Similarly, there is stress on educational partnership zones (an idea introduced by Undersecretary for Education, Manuel Rivera), which would create regional partnerships between SUNY campuses and high-need school districts. Geneseo is committed to expanding such partnerships. Looking at the whole document, Dahl found the general thrust of report encouraging.

 

The Governor’s State of the State (and State of Upstate) Speeches and the Budget Message -- President Dahl was pleased with the mention of our campus as a model in the State of Upstate speech, delivered in Buffalo. The Governor is expected to visit Geneseo in the near future. In the budget message, however, the Governor’s hopes for SUNY meet the current grim realities of the New York economy. Highlights of the budget message included:

 

  • Monetizing the State Lottery to create a 4 billion dollar endowment for SUNY and CUNY, which would provide an annual funding stream for additional faculty lines.

  • 2.5% cut to SUNY’s budget (though the base from which the cuts would be taken was increased).

  • A Capital Budget that provides for 2.5 billion dollars for critical maintenance and 1.6 billion for new projects over 5 years.

 

President Dahl expressed concerns about possible cuts to the operating budget, but indicated that the capital budget provides significant new funding and would be very helpful to Geneseo. He will report on the continuing budget process at the next College Senate meeting.

Provost’s Report

Provost Conway-Turner announced:

H. James Birx Distinguished Scholar Dr. Patrick Bond, from South Africa, is visiting campus the week of February 25, 2008. He will present an open lecture on February 27, 2008 and will be available to visit classes. The Provost asked that students be encouraged to attend.

 

Beatrice Loco, from Ghana, is coming to talk about partnership with school districts she works with in Ghana. The Provost suggested this opportunity would be good for developing service-learning projects or partnerships in Ghana. Loco will make herself very available to students, staff and faculty during her visit.

 

Dr. M. Holly Radosh, from Western Illinois University, has been named the new Dean of the College effective August 1, 2008.

 

Curriculum Task Force: This semester the Task Force will be focusing on developing recommendations on the Geneseo curriculum, reviewing curriculum from other peer and institutions, and continuing to review feedback from open forums of last semester. This will be a very busy semester for the Task Force.

 

G.R.E.A.T. Day Reminder: Dr. Stephen West is coordinating the April 22, 2008 events and this promises to be another wonderful GREAT day. The Provost asked for encouragement of student participation.

 

Teach-in on March 9, 2008: The Provost commended Beth McCoy and her committee of faculty, staff and students for their work on the Teach-in and strongly encouraged everyone to attend.

 

7. The Provost announced that Roy Porter will be joining the Chemistry Department as a visiting professor on an exchange program. It is expected that we will have at least two students on our campus for the spring and fall semester 2008. The Chemistry Department will host a welcome reception for Porter later in the semester.

 

Chair’s Report

Winter Planning in Albany: Chair Granger announced that he will be attending the SUNY Faculty Senate Winter Plenary Meeting of February 1-2, 2008. The Campus Governance Leaders will continue their work on developing a Campus Governance Leader’s Handbook. Granger will report back after the meeting.

College Senate Bulletin #6 will be out shortly. Granger asked that any specific agenda items be shared with him as soon as possible. As usual, the next Bulletin is expected to be out prior to the next Senate meeting.

Elections Information: Granger stated that results from the fall elections and a call for nominations for the spring elections will be appearing in the next Bulletin. He will address the changes in some of the positions in the call for Spring elections. Granger will also send this information via Faculty-L.

Vice-Chair’s Report

Vice-Chair Showers announced that the Excellence Awards and Distinguished Ranks Committee has concluded its work and has sent its recommendations to the President. President Dahl shared that he will begin working with Becky Glass in reviewing the recommendations.

 

Past-Chair’s Report

Past-Chair Showers stated he has sent a note to the Nominations Committee Chair, Bill Gohlman, asking to meet with the committee regarding a draft proposal on changing the charge to the Nominations Committee to become a Nominations and Election Committee. He expects to be meeting with them soon.

 

Treasurer’s Report

Linda Ware absent ­ ­– no report.

 

University Faculty Senator’s Report

Maria Lima

Maria Lima reported that she will also be attending the SUNY Faculty Senate Winter Plenary Meeting to be held February 1-2, 2008.

 

Vice President, Student Association

Jarah Magan absent – no report.

 

Reports of the Standing Committees of the Senate

 

Undergraduate Curricula

Bob Owens shared that the UCC will be meeting on Tuesday, February 5, 2008.

 

Undergraduate Policies

Ed Wallace – no report.

 

Graduate Academic Affairs

Susan Salmon announced that GAA will be meeting the following week.

 

Student Affairs

Denise Scott – no report.

 

Faculty Affairs

 

Joan Zook reported that the Faculty Affairs Committee met in December. The committee has invited the Provost to attend its next meeting, and one of the topics it wishes to discuss is the value/role of the standing committees of College Senate versus taskforces (e.g., the Curriculum Taskforce).

 

The Committee has been discussing the issue of weighting on the Personnel form and the usefulness of the numerical weighting scale (currently 50% teaching, 35% scholarly activity, and 15% service) due to each department conceiving the values differently. A committee member suggested inviting Stephen West to address this issue. The Executive Committee suggested that FAC should invite Julie Meyer Rao, Director of Institutional Research, to address the latter issue.

 

Zook thanked the Executive Committee for its input and promised to report back to the committee following Provost Conway-Turner’s visit.

 

Vice-Chair Showers stated that one of things he wants to do next year as Chair is formally revisit what we want the College Senate to do for us and to address whether or not we are currently structured to accomplish our goals.

Old Business

 

Senate Bulletin distribution policy – Granger stated that Greg Hartvigsen, Chair of the Immediate Impact Subcommittee of the Sustainability Task Force, has proposed altering the Senate Bulletin distribution policy to further the effort to make our campus a green campus. The idea is to distribute the College Bulletin in electronic form only, though Senate members can request paper copies. Granger stated that this does not appear to be in violation of the College Senate By-Laws or Constitution. Following a discussion, Owens moved and Showers seconded this motion. The motion was passed unanimously.

Granger will formally announce this change in policy at the next College Senate meeting.

 

Diversity Statement Subcommittee Charge – Granger has struggling to develop a subcommittee charge that dovetails with College Diversity and Community Statement and asked for committee input. Following a lengthy discussion, it was decided that Granger would meet with Hartvigsen, suggest multiple ideas for addressing his concerns, including deliberative dialogues, etc. Granger will report back at a future meeting.

 

New Business

 

Syllabus Distribution Policy Proposal – Granger read an email from a faculty member regarding the distribution policy of class syllabi to allow electronic means. The Provost stated that the current policy requiring paper copies of syllabi is a Senate policy and that she thinks it is time to revisit the issue.

Following a discussion, it was decided that the issue would be sent to the Undergraduate Policies Committee.

 

Adjournment

Chair Granger adjourned the meeting at 5:16 pm

 

Respectfully submitted,

 

Connie Hurlburt

Recording Secretary to the College Senate

 

 

Executive Committee Meeting Minutes

26 February 2008

 

Present: K. Conway-Turner, D. Granger (Chair), M. Lima, B. Owens, S. Salmon, D. Showers, E. Wallace, L.Ware

 

Call to Order

 

Chair Granger called the Executive Committee to order at 4:04 pm.

 

Adoption of the Agenda

The agenda was approved without corrections, additions or deletions.

Reports


President’s Report

 

Chair Granger reported that President Dahl was in Albany with students for SUNY Day, visiting with legislators and advocating for the College.

Provost’s Report

 

Dr. Patrick Bond Lecture - Provost Conway-Turner encouraged attendance at the first H. James Birx Distinguished Scholar Lecture on February 27, 2008 at 7:00 pm in the College Union Ballroom. His topic: “How to--and not to--resolve the climate crisis”.

 

New Library Study Committee The Provost announced that the process for exploring and planning a new library is coming to fruition. Plans include:

 

  • Library Envisioning Committee will be formed to include faculty, staff and

students. This committee will work with consultants to develop the concept and scope of the library project.

  • The study will be conducted during the 2008-09 academic year.

  • The Provost expects the new library to sit on the footprints of Milne Library, expanding down the hill by the razing of Blake.

  • If all goes as proposed, the new library would be built between 2011-2013 and officially open for the beginning of the 2013 academic year. The Provost was very excited to share this news and hopeful that finances will allow this project to develop from conceptual, to design, to construction in this time frame.

 

Chair’s Report

 

Chair Granger thanked D. Showers for putting out College Senate Bulletin, #7 in his absence.

 

Granger reminded Committee members that nominees for the spring election are still needed. He has received a few nominees following a reminder email he sent. However, he pointed out the importance of Vice Chair and the change in the duties–i.e., not an automatic election to chair. He also asked for help in filling Gen Ed and Leave Review Committees.

 

Granger reported that he had followed up with Greg Hartvigsen concerning his resolution, “Tolerance of All Members of the SUNY Geneseo Community.” At this point Hartvigsen doesn’t wish to pursue the resolution further but reserves the right to bring it forward next year.

 

Members of the Geneseo team that attended the University Faculty Senate Sustainability Conference will be making a brief report at the March Senate meeting.

 

Granger shared that following the announcement of the new distribution policy for the College Senate Bulletin, he received an email suggesting sending it to faculty-l or allstaff-l. Following a discussion, Granger decided that he would distribute future Bulletins via email with an attachment (as is his usual practice) to the Senate member list, and then send an additional email to the Student Association and other campus groups. He also noted that anyone wishing a paper copy may still contact Jennifer Perry (Provost’s Office) to be added to her hardcopy distribution list. Granger also promised to take other suggestions under consideration.

 

Vice Chair’s Report

 

D. Showers– No report

 

Past Chair’s Report

 

D. Showers reported that he had spoken with Bill Gohlman and a meeting with the Nominations Committee will be scheduled to work with the committee on drafting changes to this committee charge. Granger asked to be included in the process.

 

Treasurer’s Report

 

L. Ware– No report.

 

University Faculty Senator’s Report

 

Maria Lima reported that, due to department obligations, she would be unable to attend the next Plenary Meeting. Sherry Schwartz, University Faculty Senator Alternate, will represent Geneseo.

 

Student Association Vice-President’s Report

 

Jarah Magan– No report

 

Reports of Standing Committees of the Senate

 

Undergraduate Curriculum Committee Report

 

B. Owens reported that the next meeting would be held on Tuesday, March 4, 2008.

 

Undergraduate Policies

 

Ed Wallace reported that following the discussion on paperless copies of syllabi. Wallace researched old College Senate Bulletins and his committee found and reviewed the current policy. It is proposing the following updated policy:

 

Syllabus

Each faculty member is required to prepare for each course an outline (or syllabus) subject to reasonable changes as circumstances demand, which will contain the following information and will be made available (as either a paper copy or an electronic version) to the students during the first week of the semester:

 

1. an outline of the sequence of the course and the topics to be covered in the course;

2. a reading list, texts, and/or materials required;

3. grading procedures;

4. test dates including date and time of the final examination;

5. schedules for assignments, experiments, and projects;

6. descriptions and due dates of papers the student will write for the course.

 

Students who request a paper copy of the syllabus will be provided with one by the instructor.

 

Copies of the course outline shall also be placed in department files." See also Academic Affairs, Section XII of Policies and Procedures.

 

Wallace reminded everyone that this does not preclude faculty from providing a paper copy and gives students an option of either a paper or electronic copy. This will go to College Senate for first reading at the next meeting.

 

 

Graduate Academic Affairs Committee Report

 

S. SalmonNo Report.

 

Student Affairs Committee Report

 

D. Scott– No Report.

 

Faculty Affairs Committee Report

 

Joan Zook is out sick. Chair Granger read her brief report:

 

Faculty Affairs Committee met on February 5, 2008.

 

Provost Conway-Turner attended and provided information on salary adjustments, promotions and the role of taskforces.

 

Old Business

 

There was no old business.

 

New Business

 

Secretary Nominees for 2008-2009 – Chair Granger reported that Brian Morgan has agreed to serve as the new Secretary to College Senate, as delineated in the constitution, for the duration of this semester and has accepted the nomination to run for 2008-2009. He asked for any feedback or concerns over appointing B. Morgan to serve out the current academic year. Granger will investigate if Morgan can remain on the Policy Committee and serve as Secretary. There were no objections to this appointment.

 

Strategic Goals and Objectives – Granger reported that when the Strategic Planning Committee met, it was suggested that possibly the College Senate could take on the Goal IV, 2 objective as a standing committee charge:

 

Strategic Goals and Objectives

 

Goal IV. Cultivate relationships between the College and the wider community that support college programs and serve the community.

 

IV, 2 Assess and document the community’s desire, expectations, and needs for involvement in College activities and programs provided by the College.

 

Following a discussion, it was decided that a meeting would be held with the Policy and Student Affairs Committees to discuss feasibility of a collaborative effort on how the two committees might address this goal.

 

D. Showers reported that he has spoken with President Dahl about hosting a retreat to discuss the structure of College Senate and he expressed interest. Showers will follow-up with the President.

 

Adjournment

 

The meeting was adjourned at 4:39 pm

 

 

Respectfully submitted,

 

Connie Hurlburt

Recording Secretary to the College Senate

 

Minutes of UCC Committee Meeting, March 4, 2008

Approved March 5, 2008
 

Present:  Bob Owens, Chair; Anneliese Weibel, Meg Stolee, Paul Pacheco, Jared Chester, Doug Baldwin, Jeff Johannes, Elizabeth Hall, Rob Doggett, Rick Coloccia, Terry Bazzett, Sue Ann Brainard, and Tracy Paradis.

Guests:  Meredith Harrigan, Gregg Hartvigsen, Leah Garland

Call to order
The meeting was called to order at 4:01.

Approval of the agenda

Moved to approve agenda – approved.

Amendment – New Theatre course and new B.A. to be considered consecutively – Approved.

Discussion of proposals:

New courses
Thea 224, Acting Techniques
        Approved unanimously

Course revisions
PlSc 327 (to 347), Terrorism and National Security
         Do learning outcomes truly qualify as written?
         Already established class, had it been new, may have asked for better ones,
        Plans in the future to have stricter guidelines for standards and format
        Approved unanimously

Course deletions
Comm 135, Introduction to communication Theory
Hist 252, African-American History Since Reconstruction
Hist 255, The Frontier Experience
Hist 269, Mini:
Hist 389, Honors Research/Writing
Thea 220, Speech in Theatre
Thea 240, Stage Movement
Approved unanimously

Revision of Major
B.A. in Communication
         Concerns:
                 Additional resources will be needed; Provost's Office has approved and cost is manageable.
                 Potential problem: Should program (Moscow) get very large, it will have to be revisited.
                 If large number of students choose third tract, could burden Anthropology and Foreign language classes.
                 Not thinking to get more majors, but that current majors adjust
                 300 COMM majors at present and in first few years, majority of students really want journalism as they do now.
                 Students tend to avoid languages; can be revisited if it begins to grow.
                 SUNY wants this program to happen, support at State level
        Approved unanimously

B.A. in Theater
        Approved unanimously
B.S in BioChemistry
        Approved unanimously
B.S. in Biophysics
        Approved unanimously

Revision of Minor
Human Development Minor
        Friendly amendment: ANTH 101, change title to Exploration of Human Diversity
        Approved unanimously

Revision of Concentration
Women's Studies
        Approved unanimously
Concentration in Mathematics for BA in Education
        Approved unanimously

Old Business - none

New Business
Feedback on adoption of the minutes via email: No problems, approval.

The meeting was adjourned at 4:22.

 

Minutes of the Undergraduate Policy Committee

March 25, 2008

 

Present: D. Aagesen, D. Campbell, D. Dezarn, E. Gillan, S. Giorgis, N. Kivitz, D. Raynor, B. See, F. Sheikh, C. Tesler, E. Wallace (Chair)

Guests: S. Bailey

 

Call to Order

 

Chair Wallace called the meeting to order at 4:10 PM

 

Dean of the College S. Bailey presented a proposal to change the GPA requirements for Dean’s List and Graduation Honors. The proposal is copied below.

 

Proposal to change the GPA requirements for Dean’s List and Graduation Honors

Raise the minimum GPA for the Dean’s List from 3.40 to 3.50 and for graduation honors from 3.45 to 3.50. The new minimum for graduation honors would take effect for the new class entering in fall 2008. The new minimum for Dean’s List would take effect for the fall 2009 semester. We believe that it makes sense for the two levels to be the same, and that is in line with the practices at many of our COPLAC and SUNY sister schools.

Rationale

For the past decade, the minimum GPA for the Dean’s List has been 3.40, while the minimum GPA for graduation honors has been 3.45. This means that a student could make the Dean’s List every semester and yet not receive graduation honors. The requirement of a 3.40 GPA for the Dean’s List was established in 1980 (raised from 3.25), while the minimum GPA required for graduation honors remained at 3.25. In 1995, the minimum GPA for graduation honors (cum laude) was set at 3.45, but the minimum GPA for the Dean’s List remained at 3.40.

 

In addition, over the last decade the number of students who qualify for the Dean’s list has risen: in the fall of 1996, 25.9% of the undergraduate students at Geneseo qualified for the Dean’s List; in the fall of 2007, 32.4% (or 1700 students) qualified for the Dean’s List. If the required GPA for the Dean’s List had been 3.50 in fall 2007, 26.7% of students would have qualified. The Dean’s Office believes that this is a reasonable level to ensure that the honor be meaningful.

 

Among our colleague schools in COPLAC (Council of Public Liberal Arts Colleges), the minimum GPA for the Dean’s List (or its equivalent) ranges from 3.20 to 3.66. Twenty of the twenty-two schools that post Dean’s List requirements online require a 3.50 or higher. Three schools’ minimum GPA for graduating cum laude is higher than for the Dean’s List; two schools’ required GPA is lower; the remaining schools require the same GPA for both honors. For example, the College of Charleston requires a GPA of 3.60 for the Dean’s List and a 3.60 to graduate cum laude, while Keene State College, Ramapo College of New Jersey, St. Mary’s College of Maryland, and Truman State University all require a GPA of 3.50 for both honors. Mary Washington requires a GPA of 3.50 for the Dean’s List, but only a 3.25 for cum laude graduation honors, while the University of Minnesota--Morris and the University of North Carolina at Asheville both have higher requirements for cum laude graduation honors than for the Dean’s List: 3.66/3.75 and 3.50/3.60 respectively.

 

Among other SUNY schools (from a sample of four university centers and five comprehensive colleges) the minimum GPA for the Dean’s List ranges from 3.30 to 3.60. Two of the university centers require a 3.50 for the Dean’s List, one requires a 3.60, and one requires a 3.40. The University at Buffalo’s GPA requirement for the Dean’s List is 3.60, but the requirement for cum laude graduation honors is only 3.20. SUNY Binghamton’s requirement is 3.50 for both honors. Three comprehensive colleges have a 3.30 GPA requirement for both honors; one sets the GPA requirement for both honors at 3.50; one at 3.40. Buffalo State requires a 3.50 GPA for both honors, while SUNY Fredonia and SUNY New Paltz require a 3.30 for both honors. Based on data from a small sample of SUNY Deans, no other SUNY institution has as high a percentage of students on the Dean’s List as does Geneseo.

 

The consensus among the committee members was that the proposal was a positive step forward, although there were some concerns raised. F. Sheikh and D. Dezarn worried that here might be negative effects on some students’ pursuit in either the job market or in graduate school admissions for students who would not now receive the honors because of the higher level of achievement needed to qualify. D. Aagesen noted that achieving a GPA of 3.50 would be harder in some areas than in others, favoring students with certain majors. All agreed but felt that addressing that question is best left for a day when more time is left in the academic year to research that issue. The question was also raised concerning whether a percentage (quota) might help make the process more equitable, but again there would have to be more empirical evidence needed to implement such a plan.

 

A vote was taken and the proposal passed 11 – 0 – 0.

 

Adjournment

 

Chair Wallace adjourned the meeting at 4:45 PM.

 

Respectfully submitted,

Ed Wallace, Chair

 

 

Minutes of the Graduate Academic Affairs Committee

April 1, 2008

 

Present: Salmon, Schwartz (Chair), Garrity, Hartvigsen, Harrigan, Herman, Andrews, and Chen

 

E-mail vote: Mackenzie, Wisniewski

 

The course proposal for revision of CURR 512 was recommended by Jeff Andrews and seconded by Sherry Schwartz. The Committee voted unanimous in favor of the recommend course proposal change.

 

The guide syllabi for CURR 512 was discussed and the following amendment was recommend. To change the Evaluation Procedures from a final examination to examinations. (This was to match what was listed in the outcomes). Andrew Herman recommended the CURR 512 for approval with the amendment to the syllabi. Meredith Harrigan seconded the approval. The Committee voted unanimous in favor of the recommended course.

 

 

The program proposal change for revision of the Literacy B-6th program to Literacy B-12 was recommended by Colleen Garrity and seconded by Greg Hartvigsen. The Committee voted unanimous in favor of the recommend program proposal revision.

 

The program proposal to delete the Literacy 5-12 program was recommended by Jeff Andrews and seconded by Sherry Schwartz. The Committee voted unanimous in favor of the recommend program proposal deletion.

 

Thanks to all the Committee members for their service this year.

 

Respectfully submitted,

Susan Salmon, Chair

 

 

Revised Minutes of the Faculty Affairs Committee

(Revisions to Provost’s Remarks)

February 5, 2008

 

Present: J. Zook (Chair), L. Blackman, B. Colon, J. Lovett, J. F. Morse, P. MacLean, J. McLean, L. O’Brien, A. Stanley, H. Waddy, K. Conway-Turner (guest)

 

Call to order

Chair J. Zook called the meeting to order at 4:01.

 

Provost Conway-Turner was welcomed to the meeting. She was asked a variety of questions about (1) the process used to determine salary adjustments last semester, (2) faculty promotion processes, (3) the role of task forces in campus governance.

 

Salary Adjustment

The first question had to do with which faculty activities on the evaluation form were used to determine merit. There was concern that the form measured breadth, not depth. Provost Conway-Turner explained that 22 questions were asked, 8 addressing teaching, 8 addressing research, and 6 re service. The Geneseo form was based on the Delaware Productivity Study and questions were modified for our purposes. It was developed by the Provost, then sent out to department heads for feedback, then modified to the present 22-item scale. The scale was then used by Chairs or Deans using the materials they normally use for the DSI. The score was cumulative so the faculty member did not have to be excellent across all three areas. When scores came in, they were reviewed and “cut generously” (at 11 & above) for merit.

 

A related question was whether both merit and prior salary were considered and the answer is yes, but only to determine eligibility. The faculty member in question had to be below the CUPA median for his/her rank and discipline to be considered. The faculty member in question also had to meet a minimal threshold on the evaluation form to be considered.

 

A question was asked about whether this process will be repeated next year and the Provost responded that this was done to bring people up to the median in their discipline. There will not be a similar equity adjustment next year. She commented that the budget did not look particularly good in NY state for the upcoming year.

 

Will DSI money be used for salary adjustment? The DSI money available was not enough for the total adjustment for this year. It was only a small part of the over $800,000 allocated. We anticipate having the normal DSI to allocate next year in the typical fashion.

 

Will the form used for the salary adjustment be the standard form for DSI? The Provost said she hadn’t thought about using it; it was developed only for this special purpose.

 

One committee member noted that of the 22 items on the scale only one addressed publishing; she was concerned that this sends the message that publishing is not so important. Kate indicated that there were eight items on the form that assessed scholarly/creative activities. She also reminded us that the form is a “threshold” for good work, and she found that it was successful in that regard.

 

Another committee member identified two things she found disconcerting: (1) the process used to complete the merit evaluations was different across departments and (2) there was at least one case where a new hire got a raise when those who had been here for years did not. Kate acknowledged that the system isn’t perfect and that probably some people were disadvantaged by it. She noted that both rank and years in rank were addressed; divided by those in rank 0-4 years and those who were in rank more than 4 years. CUPA doesn’t address years in rank so Kate created a two-step process.

 

Another question was, how detailed was the information Chairs got? It was suggested that a systematic, step-by-step process might help. Kate said this might work in the future but cautioned that differences across disciplines must be considered. However, we could standardize for clarity & communicate with the faculty. Kate reiterated that this was a step in the right direction but isn’t perfect.

 

How successful was the salary adjustment at getting Geneseo’s salaries to the mean? Kate said that those with more than four years at rank got to the median; those with 0-4 years at rank got to 75% of median.

 

Promotion Questions

Is there a policy about number of years at rank before being promoted? Kate: typically five years in rank at Associate before going up for Full, and six years at the Assistant level before going up for tenure and promotion to Associate.

Is an outside evaluation required? Yes, from at least two external reviewers for promotion from Associate to Full.

Can members of the Departmental Personnel Committee vote if they’re not at rank but are tenured? Kate noted that there are differing departmental policies. She would hope that most voting would be at or above the rank of the candidate, but his is not always possible given the makeup of the department. This should be decided by each department; it is not University policy.

Does it have to be in by-laws? It is not always in the bylaws, but when there is a concern, they contact the Provost.

What about early promotion (that is, before tenure)? It is possible if person has been in rank for at least five years.

 

Task Forces

The committee asked about the role of appointed task forces fit in with the jobs of senate and standing committees in the campus governance. Specifically, since the Curriculum Task Force is appointed; how does that work with elected committees whose roles overlap? The Provost said regular Senate committees have a role and a set of responsibilities. Task Forces are broader than committees and also bounded by a time frame. Their members are solicited from the Senate; are trying to have representation across many bodies and disciplines.

Two suggestions were made in response: (a) have Task Forces report on the Senate floor and (b) perhaps we should write up guidelines for Task Forces. Kate thought this might be a good idea but raised a couple of cautions. Another question was about how/if Task Force recommendations are implemented. Kate noted that it depended on the nature of the recommendation & time is also a factor.

A question was raised about whether everything had to go through Senate, but Kate said some things do not. If there’s something to talk about, we discuss it together and educate each other. There is a perception some have that Senate is losing power and Task Forces have more power to make decisions; the suggestion was made that we open the process up a little to decrease the perception of undue power being held within Task Forces.

 

Chair Zook announced that the next Committee meeting will be held on 4 March, at 4 pm, in Union 325. We will be discussing issues related to revising the faculty evaluation form. Chair Zook asked us to look over the handouts (chapters 2 & 8 from the Arreola book) in preparation for the next meeting.

Chair Zook announced that the next Committee meeting will be held on 4 March, at 4 pm, in Union 325. We will be discussing issues related to revising the faculty evaluation form. Chair Zook asked us to look over the handouts (chapters 2 & 8 from the Arreola book) in preparation for the next meeting.

     

 

Adjournment

 

Chair Zook adjourned the meeting at 5:00 pm.

 

Respectfully submitted,

Leigh O’Brien

 

 

UCC Proposal Descriptions

Actual proposals can be accessed at http://boxes.geneseo.edu/outboxes/DeanOfCollege/doc/UCC_pending/

 

New courses

 

Comn 379, Communication: Integrated Applications

This course provides students the chance to make a clear connection between the communication concepts they have learned in their classes and their future personal and professional life. In doing so, students will look back to review and discuss key concepts, look inward to see how these concepts impact their own lives and look forward to make explicit connections to their anticipated future. Concurrently, students will engage in a self-reflective process in preparation for a professional career. Students will exhibit this reflective experience primarily through the development of a final professional portfolio. Other communication and life skills will be discussed and refined during the course of the semester. Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing and at least 24 completed credit hours in the major, or permission of the instructor. Offered once yearly, this class will count as an Elective Course for

communication majors. Credits: 3

 

Geog 230, Biogeography

Biogeography is the study of the distribution of plants and animals in space and through time. Students will investigate biogeographic concepts, theory and methods through lecture, reading and hands-on exercises. The course will address the origins of the biogeographic subdiscipline, fundamental biogeographic principles, critical research over the past few decades, and current environmental topics. Prerequisites: GEOG110 or permission of instructor. Credits: 3

 

GSci 335, Global climate Change

The study of fundamental concepts of global-scale environmental and climatic changes in the context of Earth-surface processes and Earth history. The course focuses on physical, chemical and biological signatures of past environments preserved in the geologic record; causes and effects of major climate-changes over various timescales in Earth history; and geologic responses to Pleistocene, Holocene and historical climate change. Laboratory exercises involve characterizing surface processes, data-rich studies of climate-change records, and discussions of climate science literature. Prerequisites: GSCI 112. Credits: 3(2-2). Offered: Fall (odd years).

 

Hist 358, Black Power and Structural Inequality in post-1945

This course will focus on the post-World War II African-American experience, with particular attention to national, state, and local policies and to northern and western urban centers. We will examine the basis for structural inequality side-by-side with Black activism and alternative visions for Black communities and the country. Traditional narratives of the post-World War II era have emphasized the southern Civil Rights Movement ending in Black Power, white backlash, and urban de-industrialization and decline. In the past decade, historians have collectively challenged that framework and emphasis, illustrating, for example, that governmental policies which privileged whites and reinforced segregation pre-dated the southern movement and did not simply emerge in response to the angry and violent rhetoric of Black Power. Moreover, through Northern-based local studies historians have effectively illustrated that the dichotomies of South versus North and Civil Rights versus Black Power are far too simplistic, obscuring both long-term Black activism outside the South and the common roots and bases for Civil Rights and Black Power. We will explore these and other issues related to the post-World War II Black Freedom Struggle in the North and West and the interrelated themes of structural inequality and white privilege through our reading Prerequisites: Hist220 and Hist221 or instructor’s permission. Credits: 3

 

Course revisions

 

Chem 324

  • Prerequisite change deleting Chem 122, Phys 123, Phys 124, and Math 221 and adding Phys 112, Math 222 and Math 228. Strengthens math prerequisites to address student success with analytical problem solving. Please note that the Chemistry Department accepted as a friendly amendment at the UCC meeting a change that would result in the proposal reading as follows: Prerequisite change deleting Chem 122 and Math 221 and adding Phys 112, Math 222 or Math 228. Either Phys 112 or Phys123/124 may fulfill the physics requirement.

 

Educ 354, Family and Community

  • Change from 2 credits to 3.

 

Hist 267, Women and U.S. Social Movements

  • Change number from 359 to 267.

  • Delete prerequisites.

  • Change syllabus.

 

Revision of Major

 

B.A. in Political Science and International Relations

  • Modify credit hours from 30-42 to 33-36.

  • Increase basic requirements from 30 to 33 hours.

  • Delete 2 additional courses at the 200-level.

  • Delete 1 additional course at the 200- or 300-level.

  • Add required course PlSc 251, Modern Political Analysis.

  • Add 3 courses at the 200- or 300-level

  • Change related requirements from 0-3 to 3 hours.

  • Change menu of related courses from CSci 216 and PlSc 251 to one of the following: FL 202, Econ 102, Econ 330, Comn 212, Socl 212, Socl 265, Hist 220, Hist 221, Phil 216, Anth 228, Geog 295, & Psyc 251

 

B.S. in Childhood Education with Special Education

  • Reflects change in credits in Educ 354.

  • Change basic requirement from 51 to 52 hours.

  • Change total hours for major from 91 to 92 hours.

 

B.S. in Childhood Education

  • Reflects change in credits in Educ 354.

  • Change basic requirement from 41 to 42 hours.

  • Change total hours for major from 81-82 to 82-83 hours.

B.S. in Early Childhood and Childhood Education

  • Reflects change in credits in Educ 354.

  • Change basic requirement from 50 to 51 hours.

  • Change total hours for major from 90 to 91 hours.

 

Revision of Minor

 

Asian Studies

  • Add to elective courses Geog 365, Phil 202, PlSc 223, PlSc 288, and PlSc 321.

  • Delete from elective courses Danc 104, Danc 204, Danc 304, Socl 105, Socl 337 either because of insufficient asian content or course taught infrequently or deleted by department.

 

 

UPC Proposal Regarding GPA Requirement

 

Proposal to change the GPA requirements for Dean’s List and Graduation Honors

Raise the minimum GPA for the Dean’s List from 3.40 to 3.50 and for graduation honors from 3.45 to 3.50. The new minimum for graduation honors would take effect for the new class entering in fall 2008. The new minimum for Dean’s List would take effect for the fall 2009 semester. We believe that it makes sense for the two levels to be the same, and that is in line with the practices at many of our COPLAC and SUNY sister schools.

 

Rationale

For the past decade, the minimum GPA for the Dean’s List has been 3.40, while the minimum GPA for graduation honors has been 3.45. This means that a student could make the Dean’s List every semester and yet not receive graduation honors. The requirement of a 3.40 GPA for the Dean’s List was established in 1980 (raised from 3.25), while the minimum GPA required for graduation honors remained at 3.25. In 1995, the minimum GPA for graduation honors (cum laude) was set at 3.45, but the minimum GPA for the Dean’s List remained at 3.40.

 

In addition, over the last decade the number of students who qualify for the Dean’s list has risen: in the fall of 1996, 25.9% of the undergraduate students at Geneseo qualified for the Dean’s List; in the fall of 2007, 32.4% (or 1700 students) qualified for the Dean’s List. If the required GPA for the Dean’s List had been 3.50 in fall 2007, 26.7% of students would have qualified. The Dean’s Office believes that this is a reasonable level to ensure that the honor be meaningful.

 

Among our colleague schools in COPLAC (Council of Public Liberal Arts Colleges), the minimum GPA for the Dean’s List (or its equivalent) ranges from 3.20 to 3.66. Twenty of the twenty-two schools that post Dean’s List requirements online require a 3.50 or higher. Three schools’ minimum GPA for graduating cum laude is higher than for the Dean’s List; two schools’ required GPA is lower; the remaining schools require the same GPA for both honors. For example, the College of Charleston requires a GPA of 3.60 for the Dean’s List and a 3.60 to graduate cum laude, while Keene State College, Ramapo College of New Jersey, St. Mary’s College of Maryland, and Truman State University all require a GPA of 3.50 for both honors. Mary Washington requires a GPA of 3.50 for the Dean’s List, but only a 3.25 for cum laude graduation honors, while the University of Minnesota--Morris and the University of North Carolina at Asheville both have higher requirements for cum laude graduation honors than for the Dean’s List: 3.66/3.75 and 3.50/3.60 respectively.

 

Among other SUNY schools (from a sample of four university centers and five comprehensive colleges) the minimum GPA for the Dean’s List ranges from 3.30 to 3.60. Two of the university centers require a 3.50 for the Dean’s List, one requires a 3.60, and one requires a 3.40. The University at Buffalo’s GPA requirement for the Dean’s List is 3.60, but the requirement for cum laude graduation honors is only 3.20. SUNY Binghamton’s requirement is 3.50 for both honors. Three comprehensive colleges have a 3.30 GPA requirement for both honors; one sets the GPA requirement for both honors at 3.50; one at 3.40. Buffalo State requires a 3.50 GPA for both honors, while SUNY Fredonia and SUNY New Paltz require a 3.30 for both honors. Based on data from a small sample of SUNY Deans, no other SUNY institution has as high a percentage of students on the Dean’s List as does Geneseo.

 

 

GAA Proposal Descriptions

 

New Course

Curr 512: Diagnosis and Assessment in Reading and Literacy

This course infuses the constructivist approach to teaching and learning in which teacher candidates use their prior knowledge and social contexts to interact and develop relevant knowledge, skills, and dispositions to become teachers committed to improving the lives of students through education.

 

Program revision

Masters in Literacy B-12 (from Masters in Literacy B-6)

This master’s program is open to applicants who have the initial classroom teaching certificate for teaching either at the early Childhood, Childhood, or secondary levels. The program prepares students to teach and administer literacy education efforts, birth through grade 12. Emphasis is placed on knowledge of research methods and findings in the field. Emphasis is also placed on diagnosis and instruction in meeting the needs of diverse learners. Culminating experiences include both planning and implementing an action research project and conducting intensive diagnostic/instructional clinical experiences with Early Childhood, Childhood and Secondary Students who have severe reading/literacy difficulties. Candidates will complete practicums at the B-6 and 5-12 levels.

 

Program deletion

Masters in Literacy 5-12

This master’s program is being deleted with the revision of the Literacy B-6 program to Literacy B-12. The new program will account for all of the needs of the 5-12 program.