Poland: The Individual and Society

THIS COURSE WILL NOT RUN DURING SUMMER 2014 or 2015

IT IS EXPECTED TO RUN DURING SUMMER 2016

BELOW YOU CAN FIND INFORMATION FOR SUMMER 2013 FOR YOUR REFERENCE

On location in Krakow, Poland – the historical, former capital city of Poland – this four-week, 4-credit hour, service-learning class that fulfills the general education requirements for SUNY schools, examines major social psychological approaches to understanding the relationship between individuals and their social contexts.  Class participants will live in dormitories of, and class sessions will be held at, Jagiellonian University (one of the oldest universities in Europe).  Students will engage in service-learning with non-governmental organizations throughout Krakow addressing social needs and issues in Poland.  Our discussions of social psychological ideas will help us better understand how culture and context affects who we are and how societies differ from one another.

Fast Facts

Program Type:Faculty led
Term/Duration:Summer/4 weeks
Summer 2013 Dates:June 28 - July 28, 2013
Summer 2013 Course Offerings:SOCL 241 or 378 (3 cr) + INTD 188 (1 cr)
Credits:4 (3 + 1)
Application Fee:$20
Estimated Program Fees:$4200
Tuition:$928 NYS Residents
$2472 Non-NYS Residents
Application Deadline:March 20

 

 

Program Details

“Poland: The Individual and Society” is a unique class in that students gain invaluable experience in another culture through their placement with a non-governmental organization (NGO) that addresses key social issues in Krakow, while also learning how social psychologists explain key aspects of human society.  Sociological social psychology examines interactions between people and how the groups to which we belong as well as the broader society and culture in which we are embedded affect them.  Students will use key social psychological ideas - learned through readings, assignments, and class discussions - to understand the social issues being addressed by their assigned NGO.  By the end of the four-week course, Krakow will feel like home to the students (it is a wonderfully easy city to navigate using public transportation) who will have a greater appreciation of key social issues in Poland and how to best understand them from the perspective of a social psychologist. 

The class schedule (click on the link to the right) will consist of 3-hour class discussions (along with guest lectures) on Monday’s and Thursday’s and students will work for their assigned NGO on Tuesday’s and Wednesday’s.  Class excursions in Krakow will include tours of the centuries-old Wieliczka Salt Mine as well as Auschwitz and Birkenau.  The weekend-long class trip to Warsaw, Poland will explore the current capital city’s history through visits to key museums (The Rising Museum and the soon-to-be newly opened National Museum of Polish Jewish history), key sites commemorating Poland’s active resistance to the Nazi regime in World War II, and contemporary cultural sites.

Course fees cover tuition, room and board, tours and weekend-long trip, round-trip air-fare from the United States.


Setting

An independent country only since 1989, Poland has become the financial capital of Europe.  Its history and culture are epitomized in two of its key cities – Krakow and Warsaw.  Students will spend four weeks living in Krakow and will have ample opportunity to explore all aspects of Polish life.

 

Course Offering

SOCL 241 (Poland: Individual and Society) examines major social psychological approaches to understanding how individuals shape, and are shaped by, the society in which they live.  Course assignments will include required readings, engaging in service learning six hours a week, maintaining a service learning journal, four short reading analysis sheets (1 per week), and a final reflective essay due after returning stateside.

SOCL 378 (Senior Seminar: International Individual and Society) examines the same material as SOCL 241 and has the same assignments except for the final essay.  SOCL 378 students will be required to write a final research essay due after returning stateside.