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Pre-College at SUNY Geneseo

Want to give your future a test-drive? SUNY Geneseo provides junior and senior high school students the opportunity to take college-level courses taught by distinguished faculty. Earn college credits by immersing yourself in a course that engages and prepares you for post-secondary education. Browse the current course offerings and FAQ below!

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Interested in taking one or more courses? Fill out the interest form to get more information and register.

Course Offerings

Summer Institute in Justice and Ethics in Modern America (Separate FAQ and Application)

Credits: 3

It’s never too early to shape a more enlightened world view. Our brand new Summer Institute in Justice and Ethics in Modern America can help you do that. It’s a four-week, remote study program that examines the ethical and political challenges that currently face American society.

High school seniors and recent high school graduates will earn college credit while previewing the expectations of the modern college classroom. You’ll read college-level material, engage in respectful discussion, explore different interests, and learn about college life from outstanding Geneseo faculty members and current student mentors.

Apply online by April 30th to enroll

Application Timeline

  • Decision and scholarship notification for first-round applicants: April 15th
  • Commitment to the program due for first-round applicants: April 30th
  • Extended deadline for new applicants: April 30th
  • Commitment to the program due for second-round applicants: May 15th
  • Tuition due: May 24th

Frequently Asked Questions

Who is eligible to participate?

The institute is designed for high school students who are either rising seniors (in the summer after their junior year, regardless of what college they plan to attend) or new high school graduates (in the summer after their senior year).

Where and when is the program held?

For Summer 2021, the institute is fully remote, so students can participate from anywhere. The program runs July 12-August 5. Classes meet each week, Monday-Thursday, 3-5p.m. A closing research symposium will be held August 17-18.

How does the program help prepare me for college and future careers?

Students will gain research experience and hone their skills in critical thinking, reading, and oral communication. They will collaborate with multiple faculty members and fellow participants and benefit from the mentorship of current Geneseo undergraduates.

Will I receive college credit?

Yes! Successful completion of the Summer Institute will yield three credits—the same as most courses at SUNY Geneseo. In addition, students who elect to go to Geneseo after successfully completing the program will receive a Scholarly Activity Grant to use for expenses such as books, research collaboration with faculty, presentations at academic conferences, and more.

What is the cost of the program and are scholarships or financial aid available?

The cost of the program is $989.70. Full and partial scholarship for the cost of the Summer Institute are available. Please see the application page link for instructions, and feel free to contact the instructors at either Carly Herold at heroldc@geneseo.edu or David Levy at levy@geneseo.edu for more information. In addition, students who successfully complete the program and matriculate at Geneseo will also receive a Scholarly Activity Grant to use for expenses such as books, research collaboration with faculty, presentations at academic conferences, and more. The cost of the program is $989.70.

Are there any prerequisites? Should I have previous experience in the subject from high school?

No prerequisites or previous experience are required. All you need is an interest in the broad subject matter and enthusiasm for discussing it with other students like you.

Who teaches in the institute?

The institute will be taught collaboratively among six faculty members from the Departments of Philosophy and Political Science in addition to current Geneseo students, who will serve as mentors to those enrolled in the program. This way, participants get a broad exposure to Geneseo’s talented faculty and a wide range of perspectives on the issues.

Meet the Faculty and Student Mentors

How much reading will there be?

Students can expect to do approximately 20 pages of reading in advance of each session. Readings will be drawn from a variety of perspectives, eras, topics, and sources.

What topics will be covered?

The program will focus on six questions with contemporary relevance to our theme of Justice and Ethics in Modern America, emphasizing the connections between theory and practice:

  1. A More Perfect Union: What Are the Foundations of a Just Society?
  2. What’s the Connection Between Morality and the Law?
  3. What Obligations Do We Have as a Result of the Legacy of Slavery?
  4. What Makes a Good Leader?
  5. Should There Be a Limit to Free Speech?
  6. How Should We Respond to Injustice, Both as Individuals and Communities?
Will there be research opportunities?

Absolutely. The Summer Institute culminates with work on a research project linking current events to the institute themes. Students will present their projects in a research symposium open to members of the Geneseo campus community.

Will I get the chance to meet any current Geneseo students?

Yes! Students in the program will be grouped with current Geneseo students as mentors. They’ll meet in small groups with their mentors every week to talk about college life as well as to work on their research projects.

Meet the Student Mentors

How will the institute course show up on my transcript if I matriculate at Geneseo?

The institute course is coded as PHIL 188: Justice and Ethics in Modern America.

Do I have to know what I want to major in?

Not at all! We expect some students will know what they want to major in, but we know many students are still figuring that out. Participating in the Summer Institute may also help you as you determine your academic interests.

How do I apply?

Fill out our online application. The application deadline is April 6, 2021. Decisions will be sent to students on April 15, 2021.

I have more questions. Who should I talk to?

We’d love to hear from you! Feel free to email us Carly Herold at heroldc@geneseo.edu and/or David Levy at levy@geneseo.edu.

ANTH 105 S/ Introduction to Physical Anthropology

Credits: 3

An introduction to physical/biological anthropology, i.e. the study of humans as biological organisms. The course explores relevant theories, methodologies, and contemporary issues within this sub discipline of anthropology, via lectures, lab work, and workshops. Topics to be covered are human genetics, evolution, variation, growth and development, and behavioral ecology, as well as primate evolution and behavior.

Fill out the interest form to get more information and register.

ARTH 171 F/ History of Western Art: Prehistoric through Gothic

Credits: 3

A survey of the history of architecture, painting and sculpture within the Western tradition from the prehistoric through the gothic periods and an introduction to the process of art historical analysis.

Fill out the interest form to get more information and register.

ARTH 172 F/ History of Western Art: Renaissance through Rococo

Credits: 3

A survey of the history of architecture, painting and sculpture within the Western tradition from the Renaissance through the Rococo Period and an introduction to the process of art historical analysis.

Fill out the interest form to get more information and register.

ARTH 173 F/ History of Western Art: Neoclassicism to Contemporary

Credits: 3

A survey of the history of architecture, painting, and sculpture within the Western tradition from the later eighteenth century to the present and an introduction to the process of art historical analysis.

Fill out the interest form to get more information and register.

ARTH 174 F/ Visual Culture Today

Credits: 3

Visual Culture studies the construction of the visual in art, media, technology and everyday life. Students learn the tools of visual analysis; investigate how visual depictions such as YouTube and advertising structures convey ideologies; and study the institutional, economic, political and social and market factors in the making of contemporary visual culture.

Fill out the interest form to get more information and register.

CHEM 104/ Chemistry and Society

Credits: 3

A terminal one-semester course designed to acquaint non-science students with how chemistry and science affect their lives. Chemical principles are applied to problems of current interest, such as energy and pollution. Methods which chemists and other scientists use in their attempts to solve such problems are illustrated. Not available to science majors.

Corequisite (must be taken at the same time): CHEM 105 (lab)

Fill out the interest form to get more information and register.

CHEM 105 N/ Chemistry and Society Laboratory

Credit: 1

A terminal one-semester laboratory designed to acquaint non-science students with how chemistry and science affect their lives. Experiments are applied to problems of current interest, such as acid rain. Methods which chemists and other scientists use in their attempts to solve such problems are introduced. Not available for credit to science majors.

Corequisite (must be taken at the same time): CHEM 104 (lecture)

Fill out the interest form to get more information and register.

COMN 160 S/ Introduction to Mass Communication

Credits: 3

This course is designed to survey mass communication in both historical and contemporary contexts. Students are introduced to the broad function of mass media, as well as the specific function of each medium. The roles of technology and the impact of mass communication on society and individuals are also explored.

Fill out the interest form to get more information and register.

ECON 110/ Introductory Microeconomics

Credits: 3

A survey introduction to microeconomics with emphasis on the concepts of demand, supply, production, input markets, general equilibrium, and economic efficiency. Attention is given to the problems of income distribution, agriculture, spillover effects, and international trade.

Fill out the interest form to get more information and register.

ENGL 101/ Topics in Literature

Credits: 4

A course exploring a particular topic involving specific themes, issues, authors, literary forms, or media types. Subtitles of “Topics in Literature” help students develop fundamental skills for critical reading and effective writing.

Fill out the interest form to get more information and register.

FMST 100 F/ Introduction to Film Studies

Credits: 4

An examination of world cinema, emphasizing the technological, formal, cultural and historical specificity of the moving image.

Fill out the interest form to get more information and register.

INTD 288/ American Black English

Credits: 3

This course looks at the varieties of English used primarily by and among African Americans. We will look at the features of African American English (AAE), its vocabulary (lexicon), pronunciation (phonetics & phonology) and grammar (syntax) and why they are critical to making a case about the systematicity of the variety. This will provide students the knowledge base necessary to critique and analyze the use of AAE in popular culture (music and film), on social media, in the classroom, and in the courtroom. Students will then have an opportunity to write a research paper in which they survey a significant topic related to AAE.

Fill out the interest form to get more information and register.

PHIL 100/ Introduction to Philosophy

Credits: 3

Encourages critical thinking about fundamental problems that concern existence, knowledge, and value. As a means to this end, several philosophical works are read, discussed, and evaluated.

Fill out the interest form to get more information and register.

PHIL 111 R/ Introduction to Logic

Credits: 3

An introduction to deductive logic, including propositional and predicate logic, Aristotelian logic, problems of definition, informal fallacies, and the elements of linguistic analysis.

Fill out the interest form to get more information and register.

PLSC 120 S Comparative Politics

Credits: 3

An introduction to the comparative study of political behavior and institutions. Brief consideration of individual cases suggests concepts and insights which will facilitate the study and criteria for judgment of differing types of political systems in differing environments and at different stages of development. Includes elementary explanation of “types,” “environments,” and the concepts of “development.” Prepares the entering student for more intensive studies of particular geographical and institutional areas. Major examples considered are drawn from areas other than the United States; however, students are encouraged to apply newly introduced concepts to the politics of the United States.

Fill out the interest form to get more information and register.

SOCL 102 S/ Social Problems and Public Policy

Credits: 3

Contemporary social problems, including macro-problems (e.g., the economy, politics, inequality), micro-problems (e.g., crime, health care), and the relationship between the two are studied. Emphasis is on understanding both causes and symptoms of contemporary social problems.

Fill out the interest form to get more information and register.

SOCL 105 S/M/ Introduction to Global Social Change

Credits: 3

An introductory level examination of changing conditions in the Third World, using sociological concepts. Focus will be on one or more of the following areas: Asia, Africa, the Middle East, Latin America, and the Caribbean. This course will emphasize social, economic and political changes that affect daily life and experiences of people in these societies.

Fill out the interest form to get more information and register.

THEA 100 F/ Introduction to the Theatre

Credits: 3

Consideration of the theatrical arts (playwriting, acting, direction, design) in relation to their contribution to the theatrical experience. Designed to develop discrimination and appreciation rather than proficiency in performance.

Fill out the interest form to get more information and register.

THEA 140 F/ Play Analysis for the Theatre

Credits: 3

From pages to possible stages: an analysis of the play to discover production and performance options inherent in the script. The play script will be looked at from the points of view of the various production collaborators: performers, designers, and audience.

Fill out the interest form to get more information and register.

Frequently Asked Questions

Am I eligible to participate?

Juniors and seniors in high school may take these courses. Please keep in mind that we have a limited number of seats available for the classes, so signing up early is advised.

When do classes start?

It depends on the course. Courses are offered at different points in the summer and some courses are longer than others; they are between 3 and 12 weeks long. Many of the courses begin on May 24.

To find out when a course starts, visit our online course catalog, browse courses for the Summer 2021 term, click the title of course you're interested in, and select "Instructor/Meeting Times." It will show you the course dates.

What is the class schedule like?

Most of the summer courses are taught asynchronously, meaning the classes don't meet at set times and students can log in whenever is convenient for them. However, we encourage students to look closely at the Summer 2021 master schedule for particular classes they’re interested in.

Will I receive college credit?

Yes, you will earn college credits by taking these courses. These credits can be applied to your degree if you attend Geneseo, or you may request a transcript from Geneseo and have the credits transfer to the college you decide to attend.

How much is tuition and how do I pay my bill?

NYS undergrad students pay $331.55 per credit for summer. Students will receive an electronic bill by email in addition to a paper bill.  Bills can be paid online via MC, VISA, DSCV, checking or savings account at the student's Student Account Center or by mail to the Student Accounts office, Erwin 103, SUNY Geneseo, Geneseo, NY, 14454. Bills are due May 24.

For questions related to tuition and payments, please email staccts@geneseo.edu or call 585-245-5621.

*There is a special reduced rate for non-residents that are studying exclusively online and have not yet enrolled in NY in person of $353/credit hour

Are there scholarships available?

Yes! Partial scholarships are available through the Geneseo Scholarship Fund based on financial need. There is no need to apply separately; the scholarship application is incorporated into the interest form.

How do I sign up for a summer course?

You start the process by filling out this interest form. Then a course registration link will be emailed to you, and you can register for the course of your choosing.

Please note that filling out the interest form does not immediately save your seat in a course, and it also does not obligate you to take the course.

What is the deadline to register?

You have until the second day of class to register for a course. To find out when a course starts, visit our online course catalog, browse courses for the Summer 2021 term, click the title of course you're interested in, and select "Instructor/Meeting Times." It will show you the course dates.

I have more questions. Who should I talk to?

We’d love to hear from you! Feel free to email us at admissions@geneseo.edu.