Breadcrumb

Biology Course Offerings

  • BIOL 103: Human Biology

    Designed for non-majors. Principles of basic human functions are discussed and applied to prepare the student for making broad-based value judgments. Practical questions of modern life are treated scientifically from a biological viewpoint. Counts for general education only if BIOL 104 is taken concurrently. Offered every spring  Credits: 3

  • BIOL 104: N/Human Biology Laboratory

    Laboratory studies in human biology. Experiments are directed toward understanding sensory, voluntary, and involuntary functions. Prerequisites/Corequisite: BIOL 103 or permission of instructor. Offered every spring  Credits: 1

  • BIOL 105: Contemporary Biology

    Biology applied directly to contemporary personal, social, and environmental problems; the biological problems evolving from technology; and current suggestions offered by leading biologists on solving these problems. To receive credit for the Natural Science Core, students must also take the laboratory BIOL 106. Corequisite: BIOL 106. ¬†Offered every fall  Credits: 3

  • BIOL 106: N/Contemporary Biology Lab

    Laboratory studies in Contemporary Biology. Experiments are directed toward understanding current issues in biology such as those concerned with genetics, development and neurobiology. Emphasis is on the practical use of the methods of science. Corequisite: BIOL 105 or permission of instructor. Offered every fall  Credits: 1

  • BIOL 116: N/General Biology Laboratory

    An introductory experience which develops laboratory and analytical skills in the biological sciences. Prerequisites/Corequisite: BIOL 117 or BIOL 119.  Credits: 2

  • BIOL 117: Gen Biol:Cells,Genetics,Evol

    An introductory course in the biological sciences covering cells, information coding and transfer, evolution, and diversity of unicellular organisms. This course will emphasize examples from both the plant and animal kingdoms using an integrated approach. Counts for general education only when taken with BIOL 116. Intended for science majors and other well-prepared students. Prerequisites: High School biology and chemistry. Offered every fall  Credits: 3

  • BIOL 119: N/GenBio:Diversity,Physiol,Eco

    An introductory course in the biological sciences covering animal diversity, animal biology, plant biology, and ecology. Counts for general education only when taken with BIOL 116. Prerequisites: BIOL 117. Offered every spring  Credits: 3

  • BIOL 128: Freshman Experience in Biology

    This course is intended for students considering a major in Biology or Biochemistry. It is meant to engage students in their academic program and the college. The goals of the course are to give students a sense of community, provide help with study skills and introduce students to resources available at the college. This course is designed for freshmen. Other students may be able to enroll if space permits. Graded on S/U basis.  Credits: 1

  • BIOL 188: Experimental:

    Credits: 0-4

  • BIOL 199: Directed Study

    Credits: 1-3

  • BIOL 203: Principles of Ecology

    A study of the interrelationship of organisms and their environment. Emphasis is placed upon levels of ecological organization. BIOL 117 and BIOL 119. Restricted to pre-biology majors, majors, and minors.  Credits: 3

  • BIOL 204: Ecology Laboratory

    Selected laboratory research projects in levels of ecological organization from organisms to populations, communities, and ecosystems. Restricted to pre-biology majors, majors, and minors. Prerequisites/Corerequisite: BIOL 203.  Credits: 1

  • BIOL 207: Human Anatomy

    The structure of the human body, including the organization, development, and relationships of the tissues. Prerequisites: BIOL 117 and BIOL 119. Offered every fall  Credits: 3

  • BIOL 208: Anatomy Laboratory

    Mammalian body structure, including both gross and microscopic studies. Prerequisite/Corequisite: BIOL 207 and permission of the instructor.  Credits: 1

  • BIOL 210: Nutrition

    The biology and chemistry of nutrients are discussed with special emphasis on their role in human physiology. Normal nutrition throughout the life cycle, nutrition in sports, weight management, and diseases resulting from improper nutrition are also considered. May not be used toward the major. Prerequisites: One 100-level course in biology. Offered every fall.  Credits: 3

  • BIOL 215: Plant Diversity

    This course covers bacteria, algae, fungi, and both vascular and non-vascular plants. The structure, function, ecology and economic importance of these groups will be introduced both in lecture and in lab.Restricted to pre-biology majors, majors, and minors. Prerequisites: BIOL 117 and BIOL 119. Offered every fall  Credits: 0-4

  • BIOL 216: Biology Second Year Laboratory

    This course is designed for second year Biology and Biochemistry majors. It will include modules centered around Ecology, Genetics and Cell biology. Students will be introduced to select experimental techniques and experimental design that reflect contemporary practices in each of these areas. The course will count as a 200 level lab for the Biology BS and BA and as an elective for the Biochemistry BS degree. Restricted to pre-biology majors, majors, and minors. Prerequisites: BIOL 117 and BIOL 119.  Credits: 1

  • BIOL 220: Research Tech in Biol:

    A sophomore laboratory designed for students who want to explore the process of science in the research setting. Groups of students will have a chance to carry out experiments in biology that are aimed at exploring a specific problem at the forefront of knowledge. The subspecialty of this offering is (subtitle). Prerequisites: Biology or Biochemistry Majors with Sophomore status; May be taken only once for credit. Not offered on a regular basis.  Credits: 1

  • BIOL 222: Principles of Genetics

    An in-depth treatment of heredity, the gene, and the function of genetic material at the individual and population levels. Restricted to pre-biology majors and majors. Prerequisites: BIOL 117 and BIOL 119 and MATH 112 or MATH 221. Prerequisite/Corequisite: CHEM 211 or CHEM 223.  Credits: 3

  • BIOL 223: Genetics Laboratory

    Selected experiments which demonstrate principles of genetics. Prerequisites/Corequisite: BIOL 222.  Credits: 1

  • BIOL 230: Principles of Microbiology

    The structure, cultivation, physiology, ecology, and importance of microorganisms (including bacteria, yeasts, molds, and viruses) are studied. Medical aspects include immunology, serology, disease, and sanitation. Laboratory activity complements lecture material. Prerequisites: BIOL 222 and (CHEM 211 or CHEM 223), and permission of instructor. Offered every spring  Credits: 0-4

  • BIOL 235: M/Disease&the Developing World

    An examination of the biology of disease in developing countries in Africa, Asia, Latin America and the Caribbean. This course will explore the biology of infectious diseases and their influences on history and culture of these regions as well as the social and economic impact of disease for contemporary societies. Topics addressed will also include prospects for change through current scientific research on treatment and control. Prerequisites: BIOL 117 and BIOL 119. Offered every spring  Credits: 3

  • BIOL 241: Biology of Invertebrates

    A survey of structure, classification, ecology, evolution, and physiology of the major groups of invertebrate animals. (Field trips are sometimes scheduled outside the regular class period.) Restricted to majors and minors.Prerequisites: BIOL 117 and BIOL 119. Offered every spring  Credits: 0-4

  • BIOL 242: Biology of Vertebrates

    A survey of the classification, structure, physiology, behavior, and ecology of the classes of vertebrates is presented through lectures and laboratory exercises. Restricted to majors and minors. Prerequisites: BIOL 117 and BIOL 119. Offered every fall  Credits: 0-4

  • BIOL 250: R/Biological Data Analysis

    Quantitative analysis in the biological sciences involves understanding the scientific method, experimental design, sampling theory, graphs, and data analysis and interpretation. Students will develop and test hypotheses using statistics and graphing techniques in computer-based laboratory exercises. This course may count as a Biology elective (but it does not count toward the laboratory course requirements) OR serve as the computer science/statistics related requirement. (Students may not receive credit for more than one 200-level statistics course, including credit for more than one of the following courses: BIOL 250, ECON 205, GEOG 278, MATH 242, MATH 262, PLSC 251, PSYC 250, and SOCL 211.) Restricted to majors. Prerequisites: BIOL 116. Offered every fall  Credits: 3

  • BIOL 264: Human Physiology

    This course examines the fundamental principles and facts of Human Physiology with a focus on the methods of biological control present in the main organ systems. This will be coupled to an understanding of the major concepts of animal physiology. The lab will consist of experimental work examining the major physiological systems of the human using both computer and bench work using human and animal models. This course may not be taken after BIOL 364: Animal Physiology unless permission is first obtained from the instructor prior to registration for BIOL 264. Students may receive Biology elective credit for this course or BIOL 364 but not both. Prerequisites: BIOL 117 and BIOL 119 and permission of instructor. Offered every spring  Credits: 0-4

  • BIOL 265: Anatomy & Physiology I

    This course is the first of a two-course sequence that examines the structure and function of the human body. The first semester studies the skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems. This course contains a lecture and a required laboratory, which will feature dissections as well as physiological experiments. This course may not be taken after BIOL 364 Animal Physiology unless permission is first obtained from the Biology Chair prior to registration for this A&P course. Students may receive Biology elective credit for this course or BIOL 364, but not both. Prerequisites: Demonstration of minimum competence (C- or better) in BIOL 117, 119. Offered every fall  Credits: 0-4

  • BIOL 266: Anatomy & Physiology II

    This course is the second of a two-course sequence that examines the structure and function of the human body. Through lectures and laboratories students will study the organ systems including cardiovascular, respiratory, gastrointestinal, and urogenital systems. This course contains a lecture and a required laboratory, which will feature dissections as well as physiological experiments. This course may not be taken after BIOL 364 Animal Physiology unless permission is first obtained from the Biology Chair prior to registration for this A&P course. Students may receive Biology elective credit for this course or BIOL 364, but not both. Prerequisites: BIOL 265. Offered every spring  Credits: 0-4

  • BIOL 271: Heredity

    For the non-major or Biology minor who is interested in the genetics of humans and the impact of genetics on human life. Topics such as human genetic disorders, social genetics, race and speciation, mutations, and agricultural genetics are discussed throughout the course. May not be used toward the major. Offered every fall  Credits: 3

  • BIOL 281: Introduction to Research

    Students will meet once a week to discuss the process of biological research. Seminar presentations by local faculty and visiting scientists will expose students to the variety of research currently being conducted at Geneseo and elsewhere. Students will explore their own research ideas to develop a project proposal that could potentially be carried out at Geneseo. Class activities willl emphasize the intellectual skills and process required to develop such a project. Intended for sophomores and juniors in the Biology and Biochemistry majors. NOTE: This course may not be used for Biology elective credit. Graded on S/U basis. Restricted to majors. Prerequisites/corequisites: BIOL 203 or BIOL 222. Offered every fall  Credits: 1

  • BIOL 288: Experimental:

    Credits: 0-6

  • BIOL 295: Intermed Levl Internship:

    Credits: 1-6

  • BIOL 297: Lab Asst-Intro Biology Courses

    Students will assist undergraduate laboratory and faculty supervisors in lab sections of first year biology. BIOL 297 students will take part in weekly class activities that emphasize preparation for lab and discussion of topical instructional strategies. A maximum of 4 credit hours from BIOL 297, BIOL 299, BIOL 381, BIOL 382, BIOL 395, BIOL 397, BIOL 398 and BIOL 399 can be applied towards the major in Biology. Prerequisites: Permission of instructor.  Credits: 1

  • BIOL 299: Directed Study

    Credits: 1-6

  • BIOL 300: Cell Biology

    An introduction to molecular and structural organization of the eukaryotic cell. Topics include: the plasma membrane, internal membranes, synthesis of proteins, membrane bound organelles, photosynthesis and respiration, the cytoskeleton and motility, cell growth and division, hormones and receptors, and nerve cells and electrical properties of membranes. Restricted to majors. Prerequisites: BIOL 222 and CHEM 211 or CHEM 223.  Credits: 3

  • BIOL 301: Laboratory in Cell Biology

    Selected experiments in cell biology that illustrate some of the basic principles, techniques and experimental models in current use. Restricted to majors. Prerequisites/Corequisite: BIOL 300. Offered every fall  Credits: 1

  • BIOL 302: Ecology Laboratory

    Credits: 2

  • BIOL 304: Biotechnology

    This course will provide students with the basic knowledge of biotechnology and its application and significant benefits to humanity. The topics include recombinant DNA technology and genomics, microbial, plant and animal biotechnologies, DNA fingerprinting and forensic analysis, bioremediation, medical biotechnology, and biotechnology regulations and ethics. Students may receive Biology credit for this course or BIOL 322 but not both. Restricted to majors. Prerequisites: BIOL 222. Offered every fall  Credits: 3

  • BIOL 305: Biological Conservation

    Focuses on understanding the evolution, distribution and threats to biodiversity. Emphasis is placed on understanding the important aspects of genetics and population biology that impact the management and protection of species and populations of conservation concern. The course will also examine the theory and practice of reserve design and other conservation measures used in a variety of situations worldwide. Students will participate in an applied conservation community-based inquiry project at an off-campus (DEC, NY State Parks or other) site. Students will participate in collection of field data, analysis and report preparation. This course does not count as an elective Biology laboratory.Prerequisites: BIOL 203. Offered every fall  Credits: 4

  • BIOL 306: Evolutionary Biology

    An examination of the patterns and processes of evolution from the perspective of several subdisciplines within biology. Restricted to Majors and Minors. Prerequisites: BIOL 203 and BIOL 222. Offered every fall  Credits: 3

  • BIOL 311: Taxonomy of Vascular Plants

    A lecture and field course treating the nature, methodologies, and problems of plant taxonomy. Aspects of nomenclature, classification, and floristics are treated. Representative families of vascular plants are studied with particular reference to the local flora. (At least two field trips are required outside of class hours.) Restricted to majors and minors. Prerequisite: BIOL 222. Offered every fall  Credits: 0-4

  • BIOL 312: Aquatic Community Ecology

    An introduction to the organization and dynamics of the biological communities that dominate freshwater and marine habitats, emphasizing key ecological processes common to all aquatic habitats. Environmental threats to the integrity of aquatic communities and issues related to conservation will serve as a focus for readings and class discussions. The laboratory will emphasize field surveys and practical techniques, both analytical and quantitative. Participation on a field trip to a marine station is required. Restricted to majors and minors. Prerequisite: BIOL 203 and (BIOL 204 or BIOL 216 or BIOL 223). Offered fall, odd years  Credits: 0-4

  • BIOL 314: Biodiversity

    This is an intensive, field-based course that looks at a specific region, its biological diversity and the physical and biotic factors that are significant in controlling this diversity. A variety of organisms will be considered with most attention given to organisms that are most readily observed (common plants, vertebrates and insects). Students will learn about specific organisms and understand how their structure, physiology and behavior influence their distribution and thereby the diversity of a region. The course will take advantage of the unique features of a particular region to consider the processes and the physical and biological attributes that contribute to the biodiversity of a region. May be taken once for major credit. Restricted to majors and minors. Prerequisites: BIOL 203, BIOL 222, or permission of the instructor. Offered during summer or during winter/spring break.  Credits: 0-3

  • BIOL 315: Sustainability Science

    Sustainability science is a problem-driven field that focuses on both the protection of the environment and the maintenance and enhancement of life for current and future human generations. This course will explore some of the major scientific issues behind our understanding of sustainability by focusing on major themes of biodiversity, water, global change, energy and resources, food and agriculture, waste and human health. We will examine data from current research to understand the scientific basis of these problems, and to assess potential solutions. Particular attention will be given to issues in New York and in the United States through lectures, case studies and projects. Prerequisites: (BIOL 203 or ENVR 124) and (GEOG 111/112 OR GSCI 140/141). Offered every spring  Credits: 3

  • BIOL 316: Comparative Sustainability

    This course will allow students to come face-to-face with the particular biodiversity, water, energy, food, and health issues of a non-North American, non-industrialized country, and compare them to similar issues in the U.S. The hybrid, online, study abroad course provides the opportunity to understand sustainability issues in the U.S. and study background material about Nicaragua's environmental sustainability situation for a week before departure. Two weeks in Nicaragua will provide immersion in the issues particular to that place, followed by a wrap-up week of online classes, discussions, and reports. This offers our students a unique perspective from which they can deeply examine global sustainability issues. Cross-listed with ENVR 316. Prerequisites: BIOL 119 or ENVR 124. Offered only during the summer session.  Credits: 0-3

  • BIOL 322: Molecular Biology

    An advanced course dealing with genetic and regulatory mechanisms at the cell and molecular level. Students may receive Biology credit for this course or Biol 304, but not both. Restricted to majors. Prerequisites: BIOL 300, and (CHEM 300 or CHEM 302 or BIOL 335). Offered every fall  Credits: 3

  • BIOL 327: Molecular Ecology

    This course explores how molecular methods are used to address research questions in ecology. The techniques for generating molecular marker data as well as the properties and applications of different types of molecular data will be examined. Topics will include phylogeography, population genetics, conservation genetics, behavioral ecology, adaptation, ecological genetics, speciation, hybridization, and microbial ecology. Restricted to majors. Prerequisites: BIOL 203 and BIOL 222. Offered every spring  Credits: 3

  • BIOL 330: Immunology

    Theory and application of the principles of immunology. Analysis by immune reactions and the use of systems in assessment of biologic function are included, with attention to the specialized procedures of fluorescent antibodies and radioimmunoassay. Restricted to majors. Prerequisites: BIOL 300 and (BIOL 204 or BIOL 216 or BIOL 223 or BIOL 301 or CHEM 301). Offered every fall  Credits: 0-4

  • BIOL 334: Biology of Cancer

    This course looks at the molecular origins of cancer with emphasis on understanding oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes and their role in signal transduction and the cell cycle. The course will examine the discovery of viral oncogenes, cellular oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes and relate them to current therapeutic approaches. The course will also cover topics in cancer prevention and treatment and look at some of the most common tumor types. Restricted to majors. Prerequisite: BIOL 300. Offered spring, even years  Credits: 0-3

  • BIOL 335: Foundations of Biochemistry

    This course will introduce the principles of biochemistry to students who have a strong interest in biology. The course is a one semester survey of the chemistry of living organisms that will focus on metabolic regulation and pathway integration. It will also incorporate elements of molecular evolution as it relates to protein structure/function. This course is restricted to Biology majors and minors. Restricted to majors. Prerequisite: BIOL 300. Offered every fall  Credits: 3

  • BIOL 338: Animal Behavior

    An integration of ethological and comparative psychological aspects of the evolution and development of behavior in animals. Special emphasis on such topics as biological rhythms, communication, spacing, reproduction, sensory systems, learning, and social structure. Restricted to majors and minors.Prerequisites: BIOL 203 and BIOL 222 or permission of instructor. (Not available for credit to students who have credit for PSYC 338.) Offered every fall  Credits: 3

  • BIOL 339: Animal Behavior Laboratory

    Studies of the behavior and behavior patterns of animals under both controlled laboratory and natural field conditions. Emphasis is placed on observational and quantitative approaches. Restricted to majors and minors. Prerequisites/Corequiste: BIOL 338 and (BIOL 204 or BIOL 216 or BIOL 223). Offered every fall  Credits: 1

  • BIOL 340: Modeling Biological Systems

    Computer and mathematical models are increasingly important tools used to understand complex biological systems. Under the guidance of biology and mathematics professors, students will work both individually and in groups to develop, analyze and present models of various biological systems ranging from disease models and diffusion processes to ecosystem dynamics. The course involves two hours of lectures and two hour computer-based laboratory. This course does not count as a Biology elective laboratory. (Cross listed with MATH 340.) Restricted to majors and minors. Prerequisites: MATH 222 and at least one of the following: BIOL 203, BIOL 222, MATH 223 or permission of the instructor. Offered every spring  Credits: 0-3

  • BIOL 342: Parasitology

    Examines parasites and parasitism, emphasizing the influence of parasites on the ecology and evolution of freeliving species, and the role of parasites in global public health. Restricted to Majors and Minors. Prerequisites: BIOL 300. Offered every spring  Credits: 0-4

  • BIOL 344: Biology & Global Health

    A consideration of current biological issues in the field of Global Health. This course will address biological factors that affect morbidity and mortality in low- and lower middleincome countries. Topics will include issues in environmental health in developing countries, including water quality, sanitation, air quality and food safety. The course will also examine the effects of large-scale ecological change on human health, including urbanization, deforestation and climate change. Prerequisites: BIOL 117 and BIOL 119. Offered summer  Credits: 0-4

  • BIOL 345: Biology of Insects

    A beginning and basic course dealing with the classification, morphology, physiology, exology, behavior and economic importance of insects. Restricted to majors. Prerequisites: One of the following courses: BIOL 203, BIOL 215, BIOL 230, BIOL 241, or BIOL 242. Offered every fall  Credits: 0-4

  • BIOL 354: Developmental Biology

    An introduction to the principles and concepts of metabolism, growth, morphogenesis and differentiation in developing systems. In the laboratory, students will make observations of, and perform experiments on, a variety of developing systems, both plant and animal, demonstrating a number of fundamental events of development. Restricted to majors. Prerequisites: BIOL 300 and (BIOL 204 or BIOL 216 or BIOL 223 or BIOL 301 or CHEM 301). Offered every spring  Credits: 0-4

  • BIOL 361: Plant Physiology

    Lectures and laboratories are concerned with the physical and chemical and cellular processes underlying plant function. Topics to be considered include water absorption and transport, photosynthesis, carbohydrate chemistry, secondary chemistry, mineral assimilation, growth, and control of development. Restricted to majors. Prerequisites: BIOL 300 and (BIOL 204 or BIOL 216 or BIOL 223 or BIOL 301 or CHEM 301). Offered every spring  Credits: 0-4

  • BIOL 364: Animal Physiology

    Lectures and laboratories are concerned with the mechanisms by which animals function. The prevailing theme is the biology of the whole animal. Regulative and integrative mechanisms in animal organ systems are examined. Students may receive Biology elective credit for this course or BIOL 264 but not both. Restricted to majors. Prerequisites: BIOL 300 and (BIOL 204 or BIOL 216 or BIOL 223). Offered every spring  Credits: 0-4

  • BIOL 375: Cellular Neurobiology

    This course will provide an introduction to the cellular & molecular biology of neurons. Students will learn how the intrinsic properties of neurons, together with synaptic transmission, lead to the formation of functional neural circuits for sensation, central integration, and patterned motor output. Restricted to majors and minors. Prerequisites: BIOL 300. Offered every fall  Credits: 3

  • BIOL 376: Environmental Management

    Environmental management is approached as an extension of basic ecology. The framework of study is the operation of the ecosystem and the mechanisms of its regulation of energy and material flows. Agricultural, industrial, and social activities are examined for their qualitative and quantitative effect, and the legal and educational means of controlling these effects will be examined. Particular attention will be given to critical study of land and water management practices in New York. Restricted to majors and minors. Prerequisites: BIOL 203. Offered every spring  Credits: 3

  • BIOL 378: Microscope Techniques

    A lecture-demonstration course concerned with a discussion of the principles of light and electron microscopy, the instrumentation available, and the principles involved in preparation of material for microscopy. Restricted to majors. Prerequisites: BIOL 203 or BIOL 222. Offered every fall  Credits: 1

  • BIOL 380: Biology Seminar

    A discussion course dealing with a selected area of Biology and based on current literature. This course may be repeated for up to two hours credit toward the major. Restricted to majors.Prerequisites: BIOL 203 and BIOL 300.  Credits: 1

  • BIOL 383: Graduate School & Work Seminar

    The purpose of this seminar is to help seniors through the process of applying to graduate school, and/or determining options for working in biology after graduation. Applications for most graduate programs are due in January or February. By the end of this course, each student should have selected several programs to apply to, contacted the programs and potential advisors, have some understanding of financing for graduate school, and have the majority of their application completed. For students not planning to apply to graduate school, parallel assignments will prepare them to apply for a position as a lab or field technician or research fellow. NOTE: This course may not be used for Biology elective credit. Graded on a S/U basis. Prerequisite: Junior standing in Biology. Offered every fall.  Credits: 1

  • BIOL 385: Senior Seminar in Biochemistry

    Discussion of current literature, recent advances, perspectives, or selected topics in Biochemistry. Subjects may differ each semester. Restricted to majors. Prerequisites: senior standing in Biology, Chemistry, or Biochemistry and CHEM 302 and CHEM 304.  Credits: 1

  • BIOL 388: Experimental:

    Credits: 0-4

  • BIOL 389: Experimental:

    Credits: 2-4

  • BIOL 390: Molecular Techniques

    An introduction to basic techniques commonly used in biotechnology. Laboratory exercises include DNA, RNA, and protein manipulations, web-based sequence analysis, and the use of associated apparatus. Lectures cover background information of the techniques and their applications. Restricted to majors. Prerequisites: BIOL 300 and one of the following: (BIOL 216, BIOL 223, BIOL 230, BIOL 301, CHEM 301, BIOL 330).  Credits: 0-2

  • BIOL 391: Electron Microscopy

    A project based course designed to help students acquire the skills required in electron microscopy. Students will learn to prepare biological samples for transmission and scanning electron microscopy, to operate the electron microscopes and ancillary equipment, and to select, process and interpret images. Restricted to majors. Prerequisites: BIOL 378. Offered every spring  Credits: 2

  • BIOL 392: Genome Analysis

    This course examines and utilizes modern experimental strategies to study DNA, RNA, and protein. Special emphasis is placed on bioinformatics resources for cellular molecules and strategies for their simultaneous analysis. Lectures will be supported by the analysis of primary literature, computational laboratory experiments, and traditional laboratory experiments. Topics covered will be discussed with respect to modern questions in genomics, molecular genetics, and biochemistry. Restricted to majors. Prerequisites: BIOL 300 and (BIOL 204 or BIOL 216 or BIOL 223 or BIOL 301 or CHEM 301). Offered every spring  Credits: 0-2

  • BIOL 393: Honors Research/Thesis

    Two semesters of research and writing within the department for the preparation of an undergraduate thesis and presentation at the Undergraduate Research Symposium. The thesis will include research goals, background, experimental procedures, data analysis and discussion. Credit for Honors 393 requires a grade of A. BIOL 393 may not be applied to the thirty-six credits required for the Biology major. Prerequisites: BIOL 399 or a significant summer research; a Biology and overall GPA of 3.45; twenty-one hours of biology coursework; and the invitation of the Biology Honors Committee.  Credits: 3-6

  • BIOL 394: Neurobiology Techniques

    An introduction to the methods and experimental strategies used to explore the structure and function of the nervous system. Students will become familiar with physiological methods such as extracellular and intracellular recording of neural activity, and the use of computers for data acquisition and analysis. Students will learn anatomical methods for identification of neuronal projections, staining to reveal neuronal form, and immunocytochemistry to identify neurotransmitters, receptors, and other molecular structures. Prerequisites: BIOL 300 and (BIOL 204 or BIOL 216 or BIOL 223). Offered every fall  Credits: 0-2

  • BIOL 395: Internship in Biology

    A maximum of four credit hours from BIOL 299, BIOL 395 and BIOL 399 may be applied toward the major in Biology. Offered by individual arrangement  Credits: 1-12

  • BIOL 396: Advanced Research in Biology

    Advanced field or laboratory research in Biology This course is for students who wish to continue with a research project in the biological sciences after having have demonstrated interest and expertise in the project for at least two semesters of for-credit research on any biological topic. This course satisfies one of the laboratory requirements for the Biology B.S. and B.A. degrees. Prerequisites: Two semesters BIOL 299 or 399 involving field or laboratory research and permission of instructor. Offered by individual arrangement every semester  Credits: 1-2

  • BIOL 397: Lab Instr-Intr Biology Courses

    Students who serve as laboratory instructors will have a weekly class meeting that emphasizes preparation for the lab and topical instructional strategies. They will also teach one lab section, grade student assignments and hold office hours. A maximum of 4 credit hours from BIOL 297, BIOL 299, BIOL 381, BIOL 382, BIOL 395, BIOL 397, BIOL 398 and BIOL 399 can be applied towards the major in Biology. Prerequisites: Permission of instructor.  Credits: 1

  • BIOL 398: Biology Lab Pedagogy

    This seminar course provides students a framework for preparing to teach first year biology labs. Discussion and class activities will model appropriate instructional techniques and help students develop reflective practice. Students may take this course twice for credit. A maximum of 4 credit hours from BIOL 297, BIOL 299, BIOL 381, BIOL 382, BIOL 395, BIOL 399, BIOL 397 and BIOL 398 can be applied towards the major in Biology. Corequisites: BIOL 397 and permission of instructor.  Credits: 1

  • BIOL 399: Directed Study

    Students work individually on a research problem in biology under the supervision of a faculty member. A maximum of 4 credit hours from BIOL 299, BIOL 395 and BIOL 399 may be applied toward the major in Biology. Prerequisites: Junior standing, permission of instructor and approval of departmental chair. (1 to 3 semester hours.) Offered by indiviual arrangement  Credits: 1-6

  • BIOL 488: Experimental:

    Credits: 0-4

  • BIOL 499: Directed Study:

    Credits: 1-6

  • BIOL 500: Advanced Cell Biology

    An introduction to the molecular and structural organization of the eukaryotic cell. Topics include the plasma membrane, internal membranes, synthesis of proteins, membrane-bound organelles, photosynthesis and respiration, the cytoskeleton and motility, cell growth and division, hormones and receptors, and nerve cells and electrical properties of membranes. Students will also pursue an independent project in cell biology. Offered: fall and spring Prerequisites: One course in organic chemistry is recommended. May not be taken for credit by students who have received credit for BIOL 300.  Credits: 3

  • BIOL 501: Advanced Cell Biology Lab

    Selected experiments in Cell Biology that illustrate some of the basic principles, techniques, and experimental models in current use. The course is intended to be taken concurrently with BIOL 400 or after BIOL 400 has been taken Offered: every fall  Credits: 1

  • BIOL 506: Evolutionary Biology

    An examination of the patterns and processes of evolution and their application to past, present and future phylogenies. Emphasis placed on mechanisms of speciation. Offered: every spring Prerequisites: Ecology and Genetics recommended.  Credits: 0-3

  • BIOL 511: Adv Taxonomy-Vascular Plants

    A lecture and field course studying the patterns of variation among individuals and the causes of these patterns. Representative families of vascular plants are studied with particular reference to the local flora. Field trips will be required outside of class hours. Offered: fall, even years  Credits: 0-4

  • BIOL 522: Molecular Biology

    An advanced-level course dealing with genetic and regulatory mechanisms at the cell and molecular level. Offered: every spring Prerequisites: Genetics, Microbiology, Biochemistry.  Credits: 4

  • BIOL 533: Microbial Physiology

    Credits: 3

  • BIOL 535: Immunology

    A consideration of immunological phenomena, including properties of antigens and antigen structure; properties of antibodies and immunoglobulin structure; antigen-antibody interactions; complement; the evolution, distribution, and mechanisms of formation of antibody; cellular immunology.  Credits: 3

  • BIOL 542: Parasitology

    A consideration of patterns and processes of evolution, including the variability of natural populations, natural selection, molecular evolution, speciation, phylogeny, and macroevolution. Offered: spring, even years Prerequisites: Genetics and Ecology.  Credits: 0-3

  • BIOL 545: Biology of Insects

    The classification, reproduction, development, morphology, physiology, behavior, and economic importance of the Class Insecta are presented through lectures and demonstrations. Each student is expected to complete an extensive insect collection. (Field trips may sometimes be scheduled other than during regularly scheduled class hours.) Offered: when demand is sufficient Prerequisites: One course in invertebrate biology.  Credits: 0-4

  • BIOL 551: Vertebrate Diversity & Adaptns

    Credits: 0-4

  • BIOL 561: Physiological Plant Ecology

    Credits: 0-3

  • BIOL 566: Environmental Physiology

    Credits: 3

  • BIOL 573: Advanced Cell Biology Lab

    Credits: 1

  • BIOL 576: Environmental Management

    An extension of basic ecology, with emphasis on its biological aspects. The framework of study is the operation of the ecosystem, and the mechanisms for its regulation of energy and material flows. Agricultural, industrial, and social activities are examined for their qualitative and quantitative effect. The legal and educational means of controlling these effects are examined. Particular attention is given to critical study of land and water management practices in New York. Offered: every fall Prerequisites: One ecology course and ENVR 124.  Credits: 3

  • BIOL 578: Microscope Techniques

    A lecture-demonstration course concerned with a discussion of the principles of light and electron microscopy, the instrumentation available, and the principles involved in preparation of material for microscopy. Offered: every fall Prerequisites: or Corequisite: coursework in histological techniques or electron microscopy.  Credits: 1

  • BIOL 585: Limnology

    A study of the physical, chemical, and biological features of inland waters and the relationship of environmental factors to biological productivity. Field studies of local lakes and streams, using limnological methods and instruments, will be emphasized. Offered: fall, odd years Prerequisites: General Biology, CHEM 116, and CHEM 117.  Credits: 0-4

  • BIOL 588: Experimental:

    Credits: 0-4

  • BIOL 590: Biological Techniques:

    A laboratory course devoted to the acquisition of skills used in biology. Each skill area is taught as a separate module, for 1 or 2 credits. Options include: Ecological Techniques; Electron Microscopy; Molecular Biology; Immunology; Animal Tissue; Tissue Culture; Histological Techniques. (Credit may be earned for as many times as registration is approved by the student's advisory committee, up to a maximum of 5 credits for the M.A. degree) (1 or 2 semester hours).  Credits: 1-2

  • BIOL 591: Population & Community Ecology

    A study of the dynamics, regulation, and interaction of plant and animal populations within selected ecosystems. Population studies will include theories of growth, competition, and exploiter-victim relationships. Ecosystem diversity and processes, including succession and climax, will also receive emphasis. Offered: spring, even years Prerequisites: Ecology.  Credits: 3

  • BIOL 592: Advanced Ecology Laboratory

    Credits: 2

  • BIOL 599: Directed Study

    The student will, under advisement, choose an area of biology worthy of detailed study and pursue this study under the guidance of a faculty member. The study may be a field or laboratory problem or a search of the literature. Offered: by individual arrangement  Credits: 1-7

  • BIOL 670: Seminar in Biological Science

    Credits: 1

  • BIOL 695: Internship:

    The Biology Internship Program offers the opportunity for students to pursue a meaningful field experience in Biology through public or private agencies or organizations. The program is designed to allow the students to augment their classroom backgrounds with practical experiences. Academic credit granted for the internship can vary from 1 to 8 hours.  Credits: 1-6

  • BIOL 699: Grad Research:

    An informal course in which the students carry on individual research on a biological problem under the guidance of the instructor.(1 to 6 credit hours to be arranged). Offered: by individual arrangement  Credits: 1-6

  • BIOL TRE: Biology Elective

    Credits: 0-6