Skip to main content

Jun Okada

Associate Professor of English
Welles 224C
585-245-5241
okada@geneseo.edu

Jun Okada received her Ph.D. from the University of California, Los Angeles School of Theater, Film and Television and has been a member of the Geneseo faculty since 2006. Her research centers on Asian-American film and video, as well as global art cinema and film culture. She is the author of Making Asian American Film and Video: History, Institutions, Movements, published by Rutgers University Press in March 2015. She often teaches Introduction to Film Studies, Black Cinema, Connections in Film Studies, and Film Theory. Her essays were recently published in Exploiting East Asian Cinemas: Genre, Circulation, Reception, Routledge Companion to Asian American Media, and Cinema Journal.

Okada is the coordinator of the Film Studies minor at Geneseo, as well as the coordinator of the Alan Lutkus International Film Series. She is a member of the Black Studies committee and teaches within the Black Studies minor.

Making Asian American Film and Video

Portrait of Jun Okada

Classes

  • BLKS 225: F/Black Cinema-Lec

    This course examines the history of Black Cinema, that is, films made by and about Black people in the United States and/or within the global African Diaspora. We begin this course by asking, what is Black Cinema? What is it that makes Black Cinema unique? How is it related to the other art forms forged by Black artists in dance, music, and literature? How does Black Cinema address racism and social change in the United States and colonialism/postcolonialism in other national/cultural contexts such as Brazil, France, the UK, and/or Latin America? Topics to be covered include: economic strategies (independent vs. ?mainstream? approaches), gender and sexuality, form and aesthetics of the moving image, the politics of representation and self-representation in film and other forms of media, and filmmaking as political practice. Offered every year. Credits: 4(3-3).

  • BLKS 225: F/Black Cinema-Lab

    This course examines the history of Black Cinema, that is, films made by and about Black people in the United States and/or within the global African Diaspora. We begin this course by asking, what is Black Cinema? What is it that makes Black Cinema unique? How is it related to the other art forms forged by Black artists in dance, music, and literature? How does Black Cinema address racism and social change in the United States and colonialism/postcolonialism in other national/cultural contexts such as Brazil, France, the UK, and/or Latin America? Topics to be covered include: economic strategies (independent vs. ?mainstream? approaches), gender and sexuality, form and aesthetics of the moving image, the politics of representation and self-representation in film and other forms of media, and filmmaking as political practice. Offered every year. Credits: 4(3-3).

  • FMST 369: Con Film:The Musical-Lec

    A critical study of a theme, era, movement, genre, cross-cultural study or special subject matter involving the moving image including cinema, television, and related visual texts. This is not a film authors course. Includes a separate lab for film screenings. (May be taken twice for credit under different subtitles.) Offered once a year.

  • FMST 369: Con Film:The Musical-Lab

    A critical study of a theme, era, movement, genre, cross-cultural study or special subject matter involving the moving image including cinema, television, and related visual texts. This is not a film authors course. Includes a separate lab for film screenings. (May be taken twice for credit under different subtitles.) Offered once a year.