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Joan Zook

Assistant Professor of Psychology
Bailey 143
585-245-5033
zook@geneseo.edu
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Joan Zook has been a member of the Geneseo faculty since 1995.

Office Hours, Fall 2018

Tuesday/Thursday 12:30pm-2:00pm

Research Interests

  • Adolescent peer relationships, specifically the impact of friends and peer groups on academic motivation. I've recently begun examining how attitudes about money develop.

Links

Student Opportunities

Curriculum Vitae

Education

  • Ph.D. Developmental Psychology, Purdue University 1995

  • M.A. Developmental Psychology, Michigan State University 1991

  • B.A. Psychology, Gonzaga University, 1988

Recent Courses Taught

  • Adolescent Development

  • Adult Development and Aging

  • Psychology of Money

  • Advanced Research in Psychology - Intrinsic Motivation

Selected Publications

  • Zook, J. M., & Russotti, J. (2013). Academic self-presentation strategies and popularity in middle school. Journal of Early Adolescence,33(6), 763-783.

  • Zook, J. M., & Herman, A. P. (2011). Course-specific intrinsic motivation: Effects of instructor support and global academic motivation. Journal of Excellence in College Teaching, 22(4), 83-103.

  • "Repinski, D. J., & Zook, J. M. (2005). Three measures of closeness in adolescents’ relationships with parents and friends: Variations and developmental significance. Personal Relationships, 12, 79-102."

Classes

  • PSYC 216: S/Adolescent Development

    An overview of the nature and course of human development during adolescence. Biological, cognitive, social, and personality development are considered, with emphasis on families, schools, and cultures as contexts for adolescent development.

  • PSYC 217: Adult Development & Aging

    An overview of the nature and course of adult development. Biological, psychological, and social aspects of adult development and aging are considered, as are the influences of society and culture.

  • PSYC 390: Sel Top: Psychology of Money

    An in-depth study of a selected topic in psychology, chosen to allow an integrated consideration of the topic from the points of view of various approaches to psychological inquiry. Examples may include: The Nature-Nurture Question; Approaches to Understanding Aggression; Great Ideas in Psychology; or other topics.