College Senate Bulletin

State University of New York at Geneseo

College of Arts and Sciences

 

Correspondence to Dennis Showers, School of Education, South 222C, showers@geneseo.edu, 245-5264

Note: Page numbers indicate pages as per the paper copy of the Bulletins.

 

 

 

Bulletin No. 6

Pages 78-92

March 24, 2010


Topic Page

All College Meeting Agenda for 30 March 2010 79

College Senate Meeting Agenda for 30 March 2010 79

Undergraduate Curriculum Committee Proposals 80

Minutes, Undergraduate Curriculum Committee, 23 February 2010 83

Minutes, Policy Committee, 23 February 2010 85

Graduate Curriculum Committee Proposals 86

Minutes, Senate 26 January 2010 88


Agenda for the All College Meeting on March 30, 2010

Call to Order

Adoption of the Agenda

Nomination Committee Report: Jim Williams

Old Business

New Business

Adjournment


Agenda for Senate Meeting on March 30, 2010

Call to Order

Adoption of the Agenda

Adoption of the Minutes


Senate Reports

President Christopher Dahl

Provost Carol Long

Chair Dennis Showers

Vice Chair Chris Leary

Past-Chair David Granger

Treasurer Gregg Hartvigsen

University Faculty Senator Maria Lima

Vice President, Student Assoc. Nicholas Kaasik


Reports of the Standing Committees of the Senate

Undergraduate Curricula Robert Owens

First Reading

New Course (Found in CSB #6, pp. 80-81)

BIOL 335, Foundations of Biochemistry

COMN 203, Professional Public Speaking

ECON 383 Thinking Strategically, An Introduction to Game Theory

HIST 113, World History II

INTD 201, Leadership: (Subtitle)

MATH 382, Introduction to Wavelets and Their Application

MGMT 383, Thinking Strategically: An Introduction to Game Theory

Course Revision (Found in CSB #6, pp. 81-82)

COMN 253, Media Advertising

COMN 353, Advertising as Social Communication

COMN 368, Research in Media and Cultural Studies

COMN 379, Communication: Integrated Applications

COMN 380, Communication Research

GEOG 371, Synoptic Climatology

GEOG 382, Climate Change and Variability

Program Revision (Found in CSB #6, p. 83)

B.A. in Communication: Intercultural and Critical Studies

B.A. in Communication: Journalism and Media

B.A. in Communication: Personal and Professional Communication

B.A. in Communication: Minimum competencies revised.

B.A. in International Relations

Second Reading

New Course (Found in CSB #5, page 59)

INTD110, ESL Oral Communication.

Course Revision (Found in CSB #5, page 59)

ENGL 237, Voices and Perspectives

Program Revision (Found in CSB #5, page 59)

B.A. in English: Track in Literature/Track in Creative Writing


Undergraduate Policies Leigh O’Brien

First Reading

Motion on Pass/Fail Policy (CSB 6, p. 85)

Graduate Academic Affairs Susan Salmon

First Reading

New Program: (CSB #6, p. 86)

Combined Degree Program (BA/MAT) in Adolescence Social Studies Education
New Courses (CSB #6, pp. 86-88)

EDUC 480 - Multicultural Perspectives in Children and Youth
CURR 509 - Methods and Materials in English
EDUC 463 - International Field Experience: Early Childhood, Childhood, and Adolescence Education
INTD 530 - Teaching of Economics
INTD 531 - Teaching of Geography and Global Studies
INTD 532 - Teaching of American History and Politics
CURR 503 - Strategies for Social Studies Education
EDUC 505 - Social Studies Learning Lab

Student Affairs Justin Behrend

Faculty Affairs James Bearden


Old Business

New Business

Adjournment



Undergraduate Curriculum Committee Proposals


Go to the “Senate 2009-2010/First Reading” folder at http://boxes.geneseo.edu/DeanofCollege/doc/ucc/ to view the department proposals. The major points are summarized below.


For a fuller description, go to

\\files\Outbox\DeanOfCollege\doc\UCC_pending


New Course


BIOL 335, Foundations of Biochemistry

This course will introduce the principles of biochemistry to students who have a strong interest in biology. The course is a one semester survey of the chemistry of living organisms that will focus on metabolic regulation and pathway integration. It will also incorporate elements of molecular evolution as it relates to protein structure/function. This course is restricted to Biology majors and minors. Prerequisite: Biol 300. 3(3-0) Offered every fall.


A 300-level elective for majors.


COMN 203, Professional Public Speaking

Building on the theories and principles introduced in COMN 102, this intermediate course facilitates the continued development of oral communication competency. Course content underscores an audience-centered approach to public address. Topics include organizing speeches for specialized and professional contexts of public address, voice and diction, the proper use of technology to support presentations, critical listening, and understanding/managing communication apprehension. Assignments are tailored to meet the career needs of individual students. Prerequisite: COMN 102. Credits: 3(3-0) Offered every other year


ECON 383, Thinking Strategically: An Introduction to Game Theory

This course will introduce concepts and techniques of game theory that are widely used across all fields of economics and business as well as in social sciences. The course is a blend of formal theories and applications in economics and business. It covers normal form games, extensive form games, repeated games, games of incomplete information, bargaining, auctions, and (if time allows) coalitional games. Restricted to School of Business Majors and Minors. Prerequisites: MATH 213 or MATH 221, ECON 101, ECON 202 and Junior standing. 3(3-0) Offered when demand is sufficient.


HIST 113, World History II

This course is a comparative survey of the history of modern societies from approximately 1500 C.E. to the present. Rather than looking at one part of the world, then another, etc. we will approach it by comparing societies that dealt with the same ecological, political, social, and economic challenges at roughly the same time. Credits: 3(3-0) Offered every Spring.


Also being considered for S/M core


INTD 201, Leadership: (Subtitle)

The GOLD Leader Mentors will explore leadership concepts in the context of service to the Geneseo campus community. The course will include weekly meetings and a combination of instructor-led discussions and presentations by each of the GOLD Leader mentors. Topics include: leadership theories, the practice of leadership, leadership development, service and leadership, civic leadership, and mentoring. Students will present topics in seminar format to other students registered in the GOLD Program. Up to 4 credits may be counted towards graduation. Prerequisites: Permission of Instructor. 1(1-0)


Replaces previous directed studies for GOLD mentors.

S/U grading system


MATH 382, Introduction to Wavelets and Their Applications

This course is an introduction to the basics of digital images, Fourier analysis, wavelets, and computing in an "applications first" approach. Digitized photographs (or sound files) are stored as very large matrices and manipulated initially using basic linear algebra. Basic programming in Matlab, Maple, or Mathematica will be introduced as a means of performing the manipulations and a discovery tool. Wavelet transforms are used to aid in compressing or enhancing digital photographs, de-noising sound files, and compression using the JPEG2000 standard. Each student in the course will work on a final project that will involve coding, writing up the results in a paper, and presenting the results at the end of the semester. Prerequisites: MATH 222, MATH 233, MATH 239, and one of CSCI 119 or CSCI 120, or permission of instructor. Credit: 3(3-0) Offered spring, odd years.


Many students do not have a solid understanding of linear algebra and its applications, nor do they value scientific programming in applications, or as a tool for understanding. Computational mathematics is currently a topic in that is in the forefront of applied mathematics.


MGMT 383, Thinking Strategically: An Introduction to Game Theory


This course will introduce concepts and techniques of game theory that are widely used across all fields of economics and business as well as in social sciences. The course is a blend of formal theories and applications in economics and business. It covers normal form games, extensive form games, repeated games, games of incomplete information, bargaining, auctions, and (if time allows) coalitional games. Restricted to School of Business Majors and Minors. Prerequisites: MATH 213 or MATH 221, ECON 101, ECON 202 and Junior standing. 3(3-0) Offered when demand is sufficient.


Upper level elective.


Course Revision


COMN 253, Media Advertising

A course examining advertising traditional and contemporary principles, practices, and techniques in both historical and critical perspectives applied to the design and dissemination of advocacy messages. Major emphasis is given to marketing strategies, media planning, and advertising effectiveness in the promotion of products and services. Current trends in media advertising and advertising responsibility are also explored. Covers strategies, tactics, media planning, processes, message construction and best professional practices in today's environment of integrated marketing communications. Prerequisites: Sophomore standing COMN 107 Credits: 3(3-0) Offered fall, even years once every other year


Changes reflect attempt to delineate content between COMN 253 an353.


COMN 353, Advertising as Social Communication

An investigation of contemporary advertising as a form of global mass persuasion. The course examines what advertising is as a communication form, its impact on society, how it is shaped and regulated by the social context in which it occurs, and conceptual guidelines for its evaluation. Since the course assumes a critical approach, the interrelationship of advertising with social norms, constraints, and values is examined through selected case studies. Prerequisites: COMN 253 or permission of instructor COMN 102, 103, and 160, or permission of instructor. Offered spring, odd years every other year


Changes reflect attempt to delineate content between COMN 253 an353.


COMN 368, Research in Media and Cultural Studies

This course explores and applies selected textual, qualitative and critical perspectives in media studies, as well as an overview of major trends and developments in contemporary research in this area. Research methods in media and cultural studies are emphasized. Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing, COMN 103 and 160, and a minimum 3.00 average in the major, or permission of instructor. Credits: 3(3-0) Offered every other year


Change limits the advanced research course to those with advanced standing.


COMN 379, Communication: Integrated Applications

This course provides students the chance to make a clear connection between the communication concepts they have learned in their classes and their future personal and professional life. In doing so, students will look back to review and discuss key concepts, look inward to see how these concepts impact their own lives and look forward to make explicit connections to their anticipated future. Concurrently, students will engage in a self-reflective process in preparation for a professional career. Students will exhibit this reflective experience primarily through the development of a final professional portfolio. Other communication and life skills will be discussed and refined during the course of the semester. Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing and at least 24 completed credit hours in the major or permission of the instructor. Credits: 3(3-0) Offered once a year every other year


Change from every year rotation husbands resources.


COMN 380, Communication Research

This course provides an overview of the major trends in contemporary communication research. Areas of focus include quantitative and qualitative methods for researching communication problems in interpersonal and organizational contexts. Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing, COMN 103 and 160, and a minimum 3.00 average in the major, or permission of instructor. Credits: 3(3-0) Offered every other year


Change limits the advanced research course to those with advanced standing.


GEOG 371, Synoptic Climatology

Prerequisite change to GEOG 110 or GEOG 120

GEOG 120 has recently been approved for core.


GEOG 382, Climate Change and Variability

Prerequisite change to GEOG 110 or GEOG 120

GEOG 120 has recently been approved for core.


Program Revision


B.A. in Communication: Intercultural and Critical Studies

Adds revised course COMN 353 to list from which students select five courses for the track.


B.A. in Communication: Journalism and Media

Adds revised course COMN 253 to list from which students select five courses for the track.


B.A. in Communication: Personal and Professional Communication

Deletes COMN 253 and 353 to list from which students select five courses for the track.

Adds COMN 202 to list from which students select five courses for the track.


B.A. in Communication

Minimum competencies revised.

Students must achieve minimum competency of C- in COMN 102, 103, 107, 160, 248, ANTH 120

If a student does not earn at least a C- on the second taking of the class, she/he will not be permitted to continue the major.


Adds important foundation courses to consideration in minimum competency.


B.A. in International Relations

Addition and deletion of courses.

No change in hour requirements.

Addition of a third option for the capstone requirement (PLSC 320) in basic requirements allows for more seats offered per year to meet growing demand and provides a comparativist capstone option.

Addition of PLSC 228 as a basic requirement in response to student requests.

Other changes in the tracks reflect course deletions, renumbering, renaming, and new courses over the previous two years in various tracks.


----- ----- -----


Minutes for UCC Meeting

4 p.m., February 23, 2010


Members present: B. Owens, chair, R. Coloccia, R. Vasiliev, B. Gohlman, A Kuntz, B. Harrison, J. Yee, M. Jensen, T. Bazzett, A. Gu, J. Elmore, G. Marcus, M. Stolee


Guests: S. Iyer, T. Matthews, L. Sancilio, B. Howard, C. Haddad, J. Lewis, J. Grace, T. Hon


Call to order 4:03


Adoption of the Agenda – Chair Owens made two amendments to the agenda. 1. New course Comn 202 needs to become Comn 203, and 2. under course revisions, add GEOG 382: Climate Change and Variability. The amended agenda was adopted.


Adoption of the Minutes of the Feb, 2, 2010 meeting: passed


New Business (For fuller descriptions go to \\files\Outbox\DeanOfCollege\doc\UCC_pending)


New Courses

BIOL 335, Foundations of Biochemistry J. Lewis from BIOL explained that the course will be taught every fall. passed


COMN 203, Professional Public Speaking - passed


ECON 383/ MGMT 383 Thinking Strategically, An Introduction to Game Theory. The course is cross-listed in both Econ and Mgmt so that majors can more easily take it as an elective in either major. ACCT majors can also take it as one of their Econ or Mgmt electives. There are other similarly cross-listed courses in SOB programs. The rotation will be when demand is sufficient. passed.


HIST 113, World History II: passed


INTD 201, Leadership: (Subtitle): T. Matthews of the GOLD program is proposing this slot course for student mentors in the GOLD program to take for academic credit. He has been offering this course regularly as a directed study, but believes a slot course on the books will make things easier. He wants students to be able to take this one-credit course up to six times for credit. Discussion centered on a number of issues.


The first question was: is this an academic course? Mathews argued that it follows the national trends in leadership studies. Other schools have academic minors in this area, but we do not have the resources for that. The course focuses on leadership theory and approaches. It is truly interdisciplinary because it uses material from history, political science, communications, etc. There has been some talk of housing the course in an academic department, but Matthews wishes the course to be perceived by students as open to all in the GOLD program regardless of major. Committee members were concerned about the numbers of courses not in traditional academic programs that nevertheless get academic credit, e.g., the INTD course for RAs, H&PE courses, service learning courses, etc. Do we offer too many of them?


S. Iyer from the Dean’s office made two amendments: that students may only take the course four times for credit towards graduation, and that grading be on the basis on S/U. These amendments would bring the course parallel to the RA course, H&PE courses, etc. It was also pointed out that the 15 hours of student teaching are graded S/U. Matthews was opposed to these amendments because he has a different topic each year and wants to keep training his mentors who can start as early as the sophomore year. He also pointed out that the directed studies version of this course used regular grades, not S/U.


Stolee called for paper ballots.


On the amendment to limit taking the course to four times for graduation credit, the vote was 9 yes and 4 no; the amendment passed.


On the amendment to have the grades for the course be reported as S/U, the vote was 7 yes and 6 no; the amendment passed.


On the original proposal as amended, the vote was 12 yes and 1 no; the course passed.



MATH 382, Introduction to Wavelets and Their Application: passed



Course Revisions

COMN 253, Media Advertising: passed


COMN 353, Advertising as Social Communication: passed


COMN 368, Research in Media and Cultural Studies: passed


COMN 379, Communication: Integrated Applications: The change is rotation to “once a year every other year” There was discussion whether this is clear to students. The committee passed the revision with the understanding that the Dean’s Office would work out clearer language. This will happen not only for this course, but also for the other Comn courses where this was part of the revision. Passed.


COMN 380, Communication Research: passed


GEOG 371, Synoptic Climatology: passed


GEOG 382, Climate Change and Variability: passed


Program Revisions

B.A. in Communication: Intercultural and Critical Studies – passed


B.A. in Communication: Journalism and Media - passed

B.A. in Communication: Personal and Professional Communication – passed


B.A. in Communication: Minimum competencies revised. – passed


B.A. in International Relations – Basic Requirements –J. Grace asked UCC to make a quick modification. Since Hist 112 had just turned into Hist 113 at this very meeting, could we please reflect that change in the IR proposal? All agreed. passed


Old Business None

Motion to Adjourn at 4:45


Respectfully submitted,

Meg Stolee


Minutes of the Undergraduate Policies Core, and Review Committee Meeting

March 23, 2010

Members Present:

Ann Marie Lauricella, Joe Dolce, Scott Giorgies, Kristi Hannam, Charlie Freeman, Elias Savellos, and Leigh O’Brien, Chair.


Call to order:

With a quorum present, the meeting was called to order at 4:11 pm by Chair O’Brien.


Items of business:

The meeting began with a motion by Hannam to change the language of pass/fail grading to:


“Courses taken Pass/Fail cannot be used to meet major, minor, concentration, or General Education requirements.”


Savellos seconded the motion.


Note: Proposal would replace current language:

" The pass-fail option is available only for electives, not for any required courses. That is, students may not elect the pass-fail option for any course in the major or minor department, for any course used for the major, minor, or concentration, or for any course used to meet core/general education graduation requirements."


Freeman asked for a review of plusses and minuses of the issue.


Pluses: Language tighter and more concise. In case clarification is required at the upcoming Senate meeting, this will not apply to AOP students as they have a separate policy.


Motion passed unanimously.


Will bring forward at the March 30 Senate meeting


Repeat Policy—wait for presentation on proposed policy prior to consideration of said policy.


Adjournment:

O’Brien adjourned the meeting at 4:18.


Respectfully submitted,

Ann Marie Lauricella


Graduate Curriculum Committee Proposals

Proposals for the March 30, 2010 Meeting


For a fuller description, go to

http://boxes.geneseo.edu/DeanofCollege/doc/gcc/


New Program

Combined Degree Program (BA/MAT) in Adolescence Social Studies Education

This program will replace the undergraduate and graduate Social Studies certification programs. The proposed program requires certification candidates to complete an undergraduate major in a Social Studies discipline with some introductory course work and then to complete a graduate program to be eligible for initial certification in AD Social Studies. By completing the program, the candidate has also met the masters degree requirement for Professional certification in New York state.


New Courses

EDUC 480 - Multicultural Perspectives in Children and Youth

This course examines the impact of different backgrounds and life experiences on children from multicultural life circumstances through the reading of memoirs and novels of childhood and youth and the viewing of movies on the educational experiences of children and youth. Students in the course also examine their own educational biography to understand the impact of their experiences on their education and the development of their professional stance as teachers. The course prepares pre service and in service teachers to be sensitive to differences in children’s learning and children’s needs due to differences in their backgrounds, personal and social histories, associations, ethnicities, gender identification, learning styles, and differences from other sources. Graduate standing or permission of the instructor; no prerequisites Credits: 3


CURR 509 - Methods and Materials in English

This course focuses on current approaches and practices in teaching the English Language Arts in grades 7-12 with special emphasis on writing. It is also designed to assist pre-service teachers in becoming acquainted with literary selections and resources used to teach adolescents from grades 7-12.

This course features 60 hours of field work at middle schools and high schools. This will allow for the teacher candidate to observe and/or apply practical approaches for classroom teaching as well as the observation of theoretical models in action. As a key portion of this course, students construct a thematic unit consistent with the New York State Learning Standards and the IRA/NCTE Standards for the English Language Arts. An assortment of literature and personal-literacy based activities and assignments provide authentic experience in teaching and also stimulate reflection on pedagogical theory. Collaborative pedagogy is modeled throughout the course.

This course also emphasizes the reading of literature, in particular, the genre of young adult fiction, and will introduce methods focusing the literature within the English classroom. The course also considers the selection of literature for students of a full range of abilities including students with special needs and English Language Learners. (4 credits) Prerequisites: INTD 203, PSYC 216, EDUC 404, EDUC 347


EDUC 463 - International Field Experience: Early Childhood, Childhood, and Adolescence Education
Students in this course will spend two weeks in an enrichment practicum in an elementary school or a secondary school in England or another country. Discussions of classroom observations and seminars on comparative education will be provided in English by faculty from the host university or institute for teacher preparation). Credits: 3 (3-0).


INTD 530 - Teaching of Economics

This course provides the basic content and pedagogical strategies for teaching Economics in the middle and high school classroom. The course will look at how economic thought influences the way all individuals think both on the macro and micro level. It will compare and contrast various economic systems (e.g.: capitalism, socialism, and feudalism) to understand how they affect economic decision-making, and how these systems have influenced, and continue to influence the global economy. The course will investigate money and banking, the Federal Reserve, monetary policy, inflation and recession, unemployment, and other aspects of the macro economy. It will also investigate micro-economic issues such as supply and demand, the theory of the firm and prices and allocation to understand how a democracy works within a capitalistic framework.

Credit Hours: 3 (3-0) Prerequisites: EDUC 505 Social Studies Learning Lab


INTD 531 - Teaching of Geography and Global Studies

This course enables teacher candidates to understand and teach students to view our world as a finite system of one interconnected world. Viewing the world from a geographical and global perspective, teacher candidates will enable students to understand that certain realities emerge as critical to our earth’s survival and the quality of life for its people. Throughout the semester, teacher candidates will focus on several important thematic strands of the National Council for the Social Studies (NCSS). Using geographical and historical context teacher candidates will learn pedagogical strategies that enable secondary students to move beyond an American-centered curriculum, and develop cultural understandings in a global context. Credit Hours: 3 (3-0) Prerequisites: EDUC 404, EDUC 406; Co-requisite: CURR 503


INTD 532 - Teaching of American History and Politics

Through the lens of social studies education, this graduate level course places the teaching of American history and civics in the past and current context of America’s public schools. Looking at major issues that have influenced these subjects, students will examine major issues, influences, and strategies that have been and continue to be important contributors to the teaching of these courses in our schools’ curriculum. Topics such as racism, diversity, political pressure, anti-intellectualism, and local influences will be explored. Credits: 3 (3-0) Prerequisites: CURR 503 Strategies for Social Studies Education


CURR 503 - Strategies for Social Studies Education

This course develops competence in the pre-service Social Studies teacher through direct work with middle school students at a local middle school. The course will examine the New York State Social Studies Standards in grades 5-8, the emergence of middle schools, their philosophical roots, middle school students, and specific curricular, instructional and affective support strategies adapted for these students. Teacher candidates will have the opportunity to understand the special needs, characteristics and potentials of diverse students with whom they will deal in the middle schools by personally creating and implementing a variety of strategies for a specific group of middle school students. In addition, teacher candidates will have the opportunity to examine the scope and sequence of the entire American history element of the social studies curriculum in secondary education. They will compare and contrast the content and complexity of American History in middle school to high school juniors and seniors. Teacher candidates will understand how educators “spiral” the curriculum by building upon concepts and developing higher order thinking skills. Field Component equals 30 hours. Credits Hours: 4 (3-2) Prerequisites: INTD 203: Foundations of American Education; PSYC 216: Adolescent Development; EDUC 404: Teaching for Adolescent Learners; EDUC 406: Service Learning Seminar


EDUC 505 - Social Studies Learning Lab

This course helps to meet the state requirements for fieldwork in the Adolescent Social Studies program. It develops competence in the pre-service Social Studies teacher through 30 hours of direct work with middle and high school students at middle schools, high schools, and other educational facilities that work with adolescents. Teacher candidates will have the opportunity to work with, observe, and understand the special needs, characteristics and potentials of diverse students with whom they will deal in the adolescent classroom. They will develop an understanding of the state Social Studies curriculum by personally creating and implementing a variety of strategies for specific groups of adolescent students. Credits 1 (0-2) Offered every summer. Prerequisites: CURR 503 Strategies for Social Studies Education



Minutes College Senate Meeting

January 26, 2010


Present: C. Adams, J. Aimers, J. Allen, A. Barbarello, J. Bearden, J. Behrend, S. Chen, R. Coloccia, C. Dahl, R. Delgado, S. Derne, J. Dolce, V. Farmer, C. Freeman, K. Gentry, S. Giorgis, D. Granger, A. Gu, W. Harrison, G. Hartvigsen, A. Heap, K. Hoffman, S. Iyer, N. Kaasik, M. Klotz, A. Lauricella, C. Leary, J. Lewis, M. Lima, C. Long, D. Mackenzie, G. Marcus, J. McLean, L. O’Brien, T. Ocon, B. Owens, A. Pridmore, P. Rault, S. Salmon, D. Simmons, L. Spencer, A. Steinhauer, M. Stolee, S. Stubblefield, B. Swoger, C. Tang, J. Yee

Guests: D. Brown, J. Goldberg, T. Kenney, E. Savellos


Call to Order

Chair Showers called the Senate to order at 4:06 p.m.


Adoption of the Agenda

The agenda of January 26, 2010 (CSB #4, page 2) was adopted from the floor with no objections or corrections.


Adoption of the Minutes

The minutes of November 17, 2009 were not available for approval.


Senate Reports


President’s Report - Christopher Dahl


The State budget is out; this is always a complicated time of year. There is a good deal of substance to report, in three parts:

  1. Planning/Six Big ideas. The 6 Big Ideas Task Force has done an outstanding job. Reports are detailed on the wiki. Publicly thanking all co-chairs and those working the Ideas. Reports will go to the Strategic Planning Group to determine short and long term plans.

  2. The 2010 Executive Budget Initiatives. The big news is the governor’s Public Higher Education Empowerment and Innovation Act. The exciting thing about the proposed legislation is that it contains much of the stuff that our campus has been advocating for in terms of tuition and operating flexibility. The bill provides for reforms for SUNY and CUNY and it levels the playing field between the two. The legislation was negotiated by the Division of Budget and is supported by SUNY administration, to include the new chancellor. This is a very progressive piece of legislation that encompasses three areas:

    1. Tuition:

      1. It allows for differential tuition by campus or program. It also allows SUNY trustees to raise tuition gradually year by year.

      2. Authorizes the boards of trustees for SUNY to implement a fair, equitable and responsible tuition policy.

      3. Limits out of state enrollment

      4. Takes tuition out of the political process,

      5. Restores last year’s full tuition increase to SUNY

    2. Policies on land use, public and private partnerships and construction: We can build faster without complex procedures getting in the way of the process.

    3. Policies on procurement efficiencies: Changes oversight and review processes

  3. Effects of the Governor’s Budget. The actual budget is predictably bad but not as bad as it could be. We have $118 million in further cuts on top of the $400+ million in cuts. This is very bad, but this time around we have not been disproportionately cut. Part of the reason is that Article 7 legislation puts us on the same playing field as CUNY. If not reversed, this would result in shortfall of a few million dollars in the 2010-2011 budget year. There is also the assumption that approximately $32 million in savings will be achieved by negotiations with all of the employee bargaining units.


In closing, these are bad maybe worst times we have seen economically but as far as I can make out, but this is the best in terms of budget reform.


Questions for President Dahl


Nicholas Kaasik (Student Association): asked for an explanation about how the TAP program will be affected by the proposed tuition policy. President Dahl responded that If we exceed the maximum, SUNY campuses will ensure the equivalent of TAP funding will go to every TAP-eligible person.


Chris Leary (Mathematics): Student tuition currently goes into the state’s general fund. Does the proposal indicate that Geneseo students will pay tuition directly into the SUNY fund, rather than a Geneseo fund? President Dahl answered that this is correct but that it does not differ from current policy. Geneseo’s tuition will not be subsidizing other campuses.


Meg Stolee (History): In looking ten years ahead, with flexible tuition and the benefit of the other legislative reforms, how will the state ultimately provide support? President Dahl stated that we are long past being a fully state-supported institution. There is the question whether the ability to control our tuition puts less pressure on the legislature and the state to fund us. I am convinced that the current system has never put pressure on anyone to support us.


Steve Derne (Sociology): Do we get any more flexibility with our overall enrollments? President Dahl responded that we currently control our enrollment, and that it a problem as well as a good thing. We could raise our enrollment but the class sizes would grow, without much more revenue. Derne also asked if we get to keep the extra revenue if we increase out-of-state tuition. President Dahl stated that there are no caps on out-of-state tuition. In theory, we could raise it proportionally more because our out-of-state tuition is lower than many campuses. We could then keep the additional revenue.


Victoria Farmer (Political Science): Do you foresee out-of-state students and international students being lumped in the same category in the future? President Dahl responded that yes, they are only because there is a duality - you are either in-state or out-of-state. They are not linked regarding financial aid or recruitment. Diversity is important, we need to build a truly global and international campus. We already discount international student tuition by $2000.


Provost’s Report - Carol Long


  1. The Strategic Planning Group (SPG) and Middle States: are both working; self-study can productively investigate research questions that can help us in our strategic planning. SPG has been working to review the task force reports from the Six Big Ideas group; at their meeting yesterday they identified 16 short term action items from each of the reports that they felt could be moved forward promptly. At their next meeting, February 1st, they will be working to develop timelines and work plans for the more complex initiatives growing out of the Six Big Ideas. They will also be developing a communications plan to be sure that everyone on campus has open access to information and ample opportunity for feedback on the planning process. A wiki space has been opened for the work of the SPG and information will be regularly provided in the public area of the wiki.

  2. Phased retirement for faculty: if anyone is interested for next year, faculty are encouraged to speak with Provost Long soon.

  3. Five of us were at the AACU meeting in DC last week. We had the opportunity to work with our fellow institutions in COPLAC in several panels and meetings; this consortium is evolving and strengthening under the leadership of its first executive director, Bill Spellman. One opportunity they will provide next fall for our students is a northeast regional undergraduate research conference for COPLAC institutions at Massachusetts College of Liberal Arts. They are building a number of other interesting initiatives. If you are not familiar with COPLAC, you are encouraged to visit their website.

  4. While at the AACU, Provost Long was able to spend time with staff from the National Institute for Technology and Liberal Education; this group, of which we are a member, is now based at Southwestern University in Texas and strives to help small liberal arts colleges in particular to explore and support innovative technology for teaching and learning. At least one and perhaps two of their staff have agreed to visit our campus this spring to help us think about potential cross-curricular uses of GIS and spatial mapping technologies.


Chair’s Report – Dennis Showers

Newton Hall, room 204 has been reserved for February 17, 2010 during the all-college hour for a faculty meeting or anyone interested in organizing within the government structure and working in conjunction with the College Senate. On March 24 during all-college hour there will be an open meeting to present any amendments for voting in April


Vice Chair – Chris Leary
No report


Past-Chair – David Granger
No report


Treasurer – Gregg Hartvigsen
No report


University Faculty Senator – Maria Lima
No report


Vice President, Student Association – Nicholas Kaasik
No report


Reports of the Standing Committees of the Senate


Undergraduate Curricula – Robert Owens


First Reading:


New Course (CSB 4, pp. 36-37)

  • CDSC 207, Speech and Language Development and Intervention for ESL Speakers in College

  • EDUC 363, International Field Experience: Early Childhood, Childhood, and Adolescence Education

  • HIST 355, Slave Rebellions and Resistance in the Atlantic World

  • INTD 215,Central European Cultural History


Passed.


Course Revision (CSB 4, p. 37)

  • ARTS 200, 204, 205, 210, 215, 220, 222, 225, 230, 240, 245, 250, 305, 310, 311, 315, 316, 320, 321, 325, 326, 330, 340, 341, 345, 346, 350, 351

  • CSCI 142, Principles of Computer Science


Passed.


Course Deletion

  • CSCI 141, Introduction to Computer Science

  • CSCI 384, Parallelism


Passed.


Program Revision (CSB 4, pp. 37-38)

  • B.A. in Art History

  • Minor in Computer Applications

  • Major in Political Science


Passed.


Second Reading:


New Course (CSB 3, p. 32)

  • ANTH 237, Art and Material Culture

  • COMN 349, Advanced Issues in Personal and Professional Communication

  • CSCI 390, Topics in Computer Science


Passed.


New Core Course (CSB 6, March 17, 2009 and in CSB 9, April 1, 2008)

  • HIST 111, World History

  • HIST 163, African American History to 1877

  • HIST 164, African-American History from 1877

  • HIST 267, Women and U.S. Social Movements


Passed.


Course Revision (CSB 3, pp. 32-33)

  • HIST 322, German Society and Politics since 1945

  • PLSC 322, German Society and Politics since 1945


Passed.


Course Deletion

  • HIST 229, German Society and Politics since 1945

  • PLSC 229, German Society and Politics since 1945


Passed.


The next meeting of the UCC will be Tuesday, February 2, 2010.


Leigh O’Brien (Education) asked if it is possible to make suggestions in terms of course titles?

Showers will discuss this with her.


Undergraduate Policies – Leigh O’Brien


The discussion raised issues of whether the proposed language reflects the intent of controlling the courses students can take pass/fail.


The issue was referred back to the committee.


MOTION SECOND READING


Meg Stolee (History): I voted for this last time, but now I am opposed. The main justification was to be consistent.


Provost Long: The proposed change addresses matters of transferability of courses, minimum competency, and other problems for the Registrar.


McKeever: The national trend is most schools do not accept pass/fail so why would we?


Jim Allen (Psychology): Is there a limit on the pass/fails a student can take?


Provost Long : I spoke with Calvin this morning, he is supportive of the C- for the pass/file. His concerns were with freshman who are allowed exceptions with pass/fail policy


In favor of motion, 24

Opposed, 21

Motion carried.


Graduate Academic Affairs – Susan Salmon
No report, but check your emails.


Student Affairs – Justin Behrend

No report. Next meeting is February 9, 2010.


Faculty Affairs – James Bearden

No report. Next meeting is February 9, 2010.


Old Business

No report.


New Business

Executive Committee will present a proposal at the All College meeting on February 16th to allow voting via electronic means


Announcements

Owens: Please participate in and support the Voices project.


Tamara Kenney (Center for Community): New student code of conduct. Students have been notified and will receive it over the weekend. Changes made include removal of the word Judicial, definitions have been updated etc. Redefined the term “student” to include full time, part time, graduate students, and summer-only students. The term “hazing” was added to the Code of Conduct. New sanctions were added so we can withhold a diploma or revoke a degree.


Adjournment

At 5:38 p.m.