Breadcrumb

Sociology Courses

  • SOCL 100: S/Introduction to Sociology

    The course introduces the basic concepts, principles, and major areas of sociology. Topics include the nature of society, social organizations, and major social institutions.  Credits: 3

  • SOCL 102: S/Intro Soc Prob&Public Policy

    Contemporary social problems, including macro-problems (e.g., the economy, politics, inequality), micro-problems (e.g., crime, health care), and the relationship between the two are studied. Emphasis is on understanding both causes and symptoms of contemporary social problems.  Credits: 3

  • SOCL 105: S/M/Intro to Global Soc Change

    An introductory level examination of changing conditions in the Third World, using sociological concepts. Focus will be on one or more of the following areas: Asia, Africa, the Middle East, Latin America, and the Caribbean. This course will emphasize social, economic and political changes that affect daily life and experiences of people in these societies.  Credits: 3

  • SOCL 199: Directed Study:

    Credits: 1-12

  • SOCL 201: Black Women in Amer Society

    An examination of the status of black women, focusing on the themes of gender, race, and class. The experiences of black women will be explored from an historical and cross-cultural perspective, from slavery through the present. Prerequisites: Any 100-level Sociology course or permission of instructor. Offered every fall  Credits: 3

  • SOCL 210: Sociology of Families

    The family as a social institution and social system, including its relationship to other social systems such as the economy and gender. Topics include families in the U.S. and in other societies, the history of the family, diversity in family composition, racial, ethnic, and social class variations in family culture and structure, family social policy and legal issues, and contemporary controversies concerning the family. Prerequisites: SOCL 100 or SOCL 102 or SOCL 105.  Credits: 3

  • SOCL 211: R/Statistics for Social Resrch

    Data presentation, descriptive statistical analysis, and basic inferential techniques. Theoretical and methodological issues, as well as statistical applications, are studied. Students are trained to develop quantitative analysis skills and an ability to use statistics in social science disciplines and day-to-day life. (Students may not receive credit for more than one 200-level statistics course, including credit for more than one of the following courses: ECON 205, GEOG 278, MATH 242, PLSC 251, PSYC 250, and SOCL 211.) Prerequisites: Three years of high school mathematics including intermediate algebra.  Credits: 3

  • SOCL 212: Sociological Research

    The design and implementation of empirical research in sociology with an emphasis on quantitative methodology. Examines the logic of social inquiry and the uses and problems of various research designs and methods of data collection. Provides background necessary to evaluate research in social science, experience in conducting sociological research, and an introduction to computer methods of data analysis. Particular emphasis is on analysis of available data and survey research. Prerequisites: SOCL 100 or permission of instructor.  Credits: 3

  • SOCL 213: Sociology of Medicine

    Presents social and cultural factors influencing health and illness. Looks at the roles of health care professionals, patients, and medical settings in our society. Discusses the relationships between the current health care system and the political and economic systems. Offered every fall  Credits: 3

  • SOCL 217: S/U/Urban Sociology

    Social aspects of cities are studied, including the origins and development of cities, the emergence of suburbs, urban ways of life, characteristics of cities in the U.S., contemporary urban problems, and urban policy. Offered every year  Credits: 3

  • SOCL 218: Soc of Environmental Issues

    This course deals with the application of social science theory and methods to the study of the ever changing relationship between humans' natural and social environments. Thematic emphasis on Environmentalism as a socio-political, economic movement will inform the course. Topics include an analysis of the historical context of perceived tensions between these two environments and the changing social definitions of nature and environment. Particular attention is given to major environmental controversies and related political struggles of the past two centuries. Additionally, select environmental problems are used as a vehicle from which to explore the nature of sociology' potential contributions to the resolution of environmental controversies. Prerequisites: Any 100-level Sociology course. Offered every year  Credits: 3

  • SOCL 220: U/Inequality, Class & Poverty

    Inequalities in social prestige, political power, and economic rewards are examined. Topics include the origins of stratification, classical theories of stratification, inequality in the United States today, life styles of social classes, social mobility, and the persistence of poverty. Offered every year  Credits: 3

  • SOCL 225: Sociology of Gender &Sexuality

    This course introduces students to the sociological study of gender in contemporary U.S. society by examining the social structural bases of gendered behavior and gender inequality. Topics include gender socialization, differentiation, and stratification. The course examines gender in institutional structures including the economy, education, law, and the family. Historical and cross-cultural variations in gender are explored as well as variations by race, ethnicity, social class and sexual orientation. Prerequisites: SOCL 100 or SOCL 102 or SOCL 105. Offered every spring  Credits: 3

  • SOCL 230: S/U/Race & Ethnicity

    Given the projection of dramatic transformations in the racial and ethnic composition of the United States during the 21st century, it is important to have a historical and sociological grasp of how racial and ethnic relations have been shaped in the past and of what lessons we can learn and apply to the future of America. This course introduces sociological concepts and theories in the study of race and ethnicity, provides a broad historical understanding of how different groups were assimilated into or segregated from the American society, and examines contemporary issues on race and ethnicity, such as affirmative action and bilingual education, that define political and cultural discourse of our everyday lives. This course will also compare and contrast the race relations of the U.S. with those of other societies. Offered every fall  Credits: 3

  • SOCL 240: S/Sociology of Religion

    This course examines the relationship between religion and society and between religion and individual experiences. Topics include theoretical explorations into nature, origins, and functions of religion; interpretations of the place of religion and ritual in social life; analyses of interaction between religion and other institutions of society, like economy, politics and family; examination of religious change, and consideration of the interaction between religion and psyche, religion and socialization, and religion and inequality. Offered every year  Credits: 3

  • SOCL 241: S/The Individual & Society

    Major social psychological approaches to understanding the relationship between individuals and their social contexts are reviewed. Basic social psychological processes such as language, socialization, the self, and face-to-face interaction are discussed. Offered every fall  Credits: 3

  • SOCL 245: Sociology of Sports

    Sport is more than just fun and games; it is a powerful institution in our society, closely intertwined with family, community, education, media, politics, the economy, and other institutions. This course focuses on closely analyzing the sports landscape to understand why particular sports are and are not available and popular; how race, class, gender, and other factors shape access to sporting opportunities; how sports are shaped by commercial and political interests; and the cultural meanings attached to sports.  Credits: 3

  • SOCL 250: Sociology of Deviance

    The course is an inquiry into the social construction of deviance. Emphasis is placed on how behavior comes to be defined as deviant and the interests advanced by these definitions, as well as on societal responses to deviance, causes of individual involvement in deviant behavior, and deviance designations as a form of social control. Prerequisites: Any 100-level Sociology course or permission of instructor. Offered every year  Credits: 3

  • SOCL 265: Classical Sociological Theory

    Students will become familiar with the basic theoretical position and concepts of Marx, Durkheim, and Weber. Students will develop critical reasoning skills so that they can distinguish between the conflict orientation, functionalist orientation, and the interpretive orientation to social reality. Prerequisites: SOCL 100 or permission of instructor.  Credits: 3

  • SOCL 281: Selected Topics:

    An intensive study of a topic in sociology not covered in depth in other courses or, alternatively, an attempt to integrate two or more paradigms or converging perspectives in the field to be studied. Prerequisites: any 100-level Sociology course or permission of the instructor. (Some topics may require additional prerequisites.) Offered every year  Credits: 3

  • SOCL 288: Experimental:

    Credits: 0-6

  • SOCL 290: Sociology ofWork&Organizations

    This course will explore the historical origins of complex organizations, the internal structure and dynamics of organizations, organizations' interactions with their external environments, and the consequences of particular organizational forms for issues of power and inequality. The course will focus particularly on how changes in organizations, and in the larger political economy, affect the structure and nature of work and the conditions of workers. We will explore how gender, race, and sexuality operate within work organizations. We will also examine how the structure and meaning of work interacts with unpaid and relatively "invisible" work done outside of complex organizations. Prerequisites: Any 100-level Sociology course or permission of instructor. Offered every year  Credits: 3

  • SOCL 299: Directed Study

    Credits: 1-3

  • SOCL 310: Sociology of Law

    This course is designed to further students' understanding of the relationship between law and society, in particular the ways in which the legal system interacts with the social, economic, and political institutions of American society. Topics to be covered may include the legal profession, family law, minority rights and affirmative action, labor law, sexual harassment, abortion, euthanasia, criminal and civil commitment law, the death penalty, environmental law, or student rights. Offered at least once a year  Credits: 3

  • SOCL 314: Illness, Self, & Society

    Examines health and illness as social phenomena. Focuses on how individual experience with illness is influenced by social context. Topics include the social construction of health and illness, the experience of acute and chronic diseases, the nature and role of social support, and the self and illness. Prerequisites: Any 100-level Sociology course or permission of instructor. Offered every year  Credits: 3

  • SOCL 317: Gender & Law

    This course will explore American, foreign, and internationalgender law, introducing students to feminist legal theories and methods, and to an array of substantive issues relevant to gender studies. Through discussion of case, statutory, constitutional, and treaty law, students will develop skills in analysis and argumentation, as well as understanding of social justice, and equality issues, and principles of non-discrimination. Crosslisted with PLSC 357. Prerequisites: SOCL 100 or SOCL 102 or SOCL 105 or permission of the instructor. Credits: 3(3-0) Offered every year.  Credits: 3

  • SOCL 318: Environmental Sociology

    This course provides an overview of the field of enviornmental sociology. Participants will become acquainted with major contemporary environmental problems as well as the various theoretical perspectives--human ecology, political economy, constructivism, political ecology, ecological modernization, feminist ecology--employed by enviornmental sociologists to interpret their origins, dynamics and potential resolution. The course will also examine several deeply rooted Western assumptions about nature that are hindering the construction of a more integrated perspective on human-environment interactions. Offered every year  Credits: 3

  • SOCL 325: Global Social Change

    The course explores the meaning and causes of social change and the mechanisms by which changes occur. Socio-cultural change in historical and contemporary societies, the strategies and tactics of planned social change, and the impact of change on the individual and society are discussed. Prerequisites: Any 100-level Sociology course or permission of instructor. Offered every year  Credits: 3

  • SOCL 333: Sociology of Education

    An examination and analysis of the relationship between the educational institutions of American society and other major institutional structures such as the economy, family, and the political system. Consideration of how American education affects and reflects race, class and gender divisions. May also consider cross-cultural differences in educational systems. Prerequisites: Any 100-level Sociology course or permission of instructor. Offered every spring  Credits: 3

  • SOCL 340: Social Movements

    Both elementary forms of collective groups and varieties of social movements that affect social change are analyzed. The focus is on structural and normative considerations. Prerequisites: Any 100-level Sociology course or permission of instructor. Offered every year  Credits: 3

  • SOCL 347: Criminolgy&JuvenileDelinquency

    An intensive examination of theoretical perspectives on crime and juvenile delinquency. Emphasis is placed on the social sources of theories and on the power of theories to explain the high rates of interpersonal violence in the United States. Individual, group, organizational, societal, and cultural contributions to criminality are examined. The origins of the juvenile justice system and criminal law and patterns of criminal law enforcement are also considered. Finally, the relationship between crime and punishment is analyzed. Prerequisites: Any 100-level Sociology course. Offered every spring  Credits: 3

  • SOCL 352: Aging & Society

    Credits: 3

  • SOCL 354: Political Sociology

    This course studies the distribution of power in society. Theory and research that examine political behavior, power structures, and resistance to power is considered. Central to t he course are questions of how class, race, gender, and sexuality affect and are affected by, political structures and processes.This course also explores how social forces shape policy on issues such as welfare, health care, education, criminal justice, defense, and unemployment. Prerequisites: SOCL 100 or SOCL 102 or SOCL 105. Not offered on a regular basis  Credits: 3

  • SOCL 356: The Social Self

    An investigation of the self from a sociological perspective. The course includes topics such as the social sources of the self, the role of the self in social interaction, and the relationship between society and the self. Prerequisites: Any 100-level Sociology course or permission of instructor. Offered not on a regular basis  Credits: 3

  • SOCL 358: Sociology of Emotions

    This course examines how emotions and emotional culture are an important influence on social behavior, how social institutions shape human emotions, how emotions vary historically and cross-culturally, and how particular emotional norms disadvantage particular categories of people. Prerequisites: Any 100-level Sociology course or permission of instructor. Offered every year  Credits: 3

  • SOCL 361: Field Research Methods

    Techniques of social research conducted in natural settings, including observation, interviewing, and unobtrusive methods, are examined and skills in using them are developed. Procedures for analyzing information obtained and for presenting findings are addressed. Prerequisites: Any 100-level Sociology course or permission of instructor. Offered every fall  Credits: 3

  • SOCL 365: Contemporary Sociological Thry

    The course introduces students to the main traditions in sociological theory that developed in the 20th century. Students will evaluate functionalist theory, conflict theories, and microsociological theories. Prerequisites: SOCL 265 or permission of instructor.  Credits: 3

  • SOCL 376: Senior Seminar:

    This course may be taken to meet the senior seminar requirement in Sociology. It is an intensive study of a topic in sociology not covered in depth in other courses, or alternatively, an attempt to integrate two or more paradigms or converging perspectives in the field to be studied. Students are expected to produce a research paper and present findings. Prerequisites: Senior standing.  Credits: 3

  • SOCL 377: Senior Seminar:Internship Sem

    This course may be taken to meet the senior seminar requirement in Sociology. The internship is designed to provide students with some practical experience working in one of a wide range of public sector organizations within the local community. Students will also need to meet academic requirements which include readings, participation in a seminar, writing of a research paper and the presentation of findings. Prerequisites: Senior standing. Offered by individual arrangement  Credits: 3

  • SOCL 378: Senior Seminar:Study Abroad

    This course may be taken to meet the senior seminar requirement in Sociology. It is designed for upper level sociology majors and is conducted in an international setting. Location and topics will vary from year to year. Students are expected to produce a research paper and present findings. Offered most summers  Credits: 3

  • SOCL 379: Senior Seminar:Senior Thesis

    This course may be taken to meet the senior seminar requirement in Sociology. Students are expected to prepare an original research paper on a specific sociological issue under the supervision of a faculty advisor. Offered by individual arrangement  Credits: 3

  • SOCL 381: Selected Topics:

    An intensive study of a topic in sociology not covered in depth in other courses or, alternatively, an attempt to integrate two or more paradigms or converging perspectives in the field to be studied. (May be taken for credit no more than twice.) Prerequisites: Any 100-level Sociology course or permission of instructor. (Some topics may require additional prerequisites.) Offered every year  Credits: 3

  • SOCL 388: Experimental:

    Credits: 3

  • SOCL 391: Senior Thesis

    The student will prepare a lengthy, original paper on a specific sociological issue under the supervision of a faculty advisor. Prerequisites: Senior standing, minimum 3.0 GPA in the major; approval of Department Chairperson. Offered by individual arrangement  Credits: 3

  • SOCL 393: Honors Thesis

    Credits: 3-6

  • SOCL 395: Public Service Internship

    The internship is designed to provide students with some practical experience working in one of a wide range of public sector organizations within the local community. Students will also need to meet academic requirements which may include readings, a written report, participation in a seminar, and/or oral presentation. Credits may range from 3-15 hours per semester. (Note: Students may present no more than 15 hours of internship credit toward the baccalaureate degree.) Prerequisites: 12 hours in Sociology; minimum 2.75 GPA; and approval by both the agency supervisor and Sociology Department internship coordinator. Offered by individual arrangement  Credits: 1-16

  • SOCL 396: Teaching of SociologyPracticum

    This course is designed to teach students the pedagogical and practical aspects of teaching sociology. This is accomplished through meetings with their supervising professors and experience in the classroom interacting with students, assisting in grading assignments, and managing the classroom setting. Prerequisite: SOCL100 or SOCL 102 or SOCL 105. Offered by individual arrangement  Credits: 3

  • SOCL 399: Directed Study

    Intensive reading and/or research on a sociological subject mutually agreed upon by the student and a faculty member. May be taken for 1, 2, or 3 credits. Prerequisites: Any 100-level Sociology course and permission of instructor. Offered by individual arrangement  Credits: 1-6

  • SOCL 499: Directed Study

    Credits: 1-6

  • SOCL 599: Directed Study:

    Credits: 1-12

  • SOCL TRE: Sociology Elective

    Credits: 0-6