Office Hours

MWF 10:00 - 11:00

 

Announcements

 The Martin Luther King, Jr. Commemoration Keynote Address will be presented by Dr. Gwendolyn Zoharah Simmons on January 27, 2016 at 7:00 pm in the Alice Austin Theater.

 

Justin Behrend

Associate Professor of

History

Sturges Hall 4
1 College Circle
Geneseo, NY 14454
585-245-5587
behrend@geneseo.edu

JB picture

Justin Behrend has been a member of the Geneseo faculty since 2007. Follow him on Twitter @justin_behrend.

Faculty Information

Education

  • Ph.D., Northwestern University

Research Interests

  • Nineteenth Century U.S.
  • African American
  • Civil War and Emancipation

Awards and Honors

  • McLemore Prize for best book in Mississippi History, 2016
  • Chancellor's Award for Excellence in Teaching, 2013

Publications and Professional Activities

  • Reconstructing Democracy: Grassroots Black Politics in the Deep South after the Civil War (University of Georgia Press, 2015)
  • “Fear of Reenslavement: Black Political Mobilization in Response to the Waning of Reconstruction” in Rethinking American Emancipation: Legacies of Slavery and the Quest for Black Freedom, edited by William A. Link and James J. Broomall (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2016), 146-163.
  • “Black Political Mobilization and the Spatial Transformation of Natchez” in Confederate Cities: The Urban South During the Civil Era, edited by Andrew L. Slap and Frank Towers (University of Chicago Press, 2015), 190-214.
  • “Facts and Memories: John R. Lynch and the Revising of Reconstruction History in the Era of Jim Crow,” Journal of African American History 97, no. 4 (Fall 2012): 427-448.
  • "Rumors of Revolt," New York Times, September 15, 2011
  • "Rebellious Talk and Conspiratorial Plots: The Making of a Slave Insurrection in Civil War Natchez," Journal of Southern History 77, no. 1 (February 2011): 17-52.
Fall 2016 Classes

HIST 263:
S/U/Civil War/Reconstr:1848-77

    A study of the causes and course of the American Civil War and subsequent Reconstruction with an emphasis on the political and cultural aspects and implications. Topics include slavery and abolition,
    sectionalism, the breakdown of the party system, the war itself as experienced by both soldiers and civilians, political and military leadership, the course of Reconstruction, the conflicts generated by Reconstruction, and the ambiguous legacy of the entire period for American culture. Not offered on a regular basis
Read more.

HIST 301:
Int-HIst:Reconstruction

    This is one of two required skills-based seminars in the History major and is focused on critical reading and analysis. This class introduces students to the concept of historiography, which includes
    the critical assessment of the methods and sources that historians use in fashioning an argument, the contexts that inform historians' approaches to understanding the past, and comparisons of different historians' conclusions about similar topics. All sections will focus on a specific set of historical issues and/or events chosen by the instructor and class content emphasizes critical reflection on the variety of historical interpretations that are possible within a given topic. The class is reading and writing intensive. Majors may take HIST 301 and 302 in any sequence, and should plan to complete both HIST 301 and 302 during the sophomore or junior year. Prerequisites: Sophomore standing or higher. Multiple sections offered every fall & spring semester.
Read more.

INTD 105:
Wrtg Sem:Underground Railroad

    Writing Seminar is a course focusing on a specific topic while emphasizing writing practice and instruction, potentially taught by any member of the College faculty. Because this is primarily a course
    in writing, reading assignments will be briefer than in traditional topic courses, and students will prove their understanding of the subject matter through writing compositions rather than taking examinations.
Read more.