Breadcrumb

Anthropology Course Offerings

  • ANTH 100: S/M/Intr Cultural Anthropology

    This course has two broad aims. One is to introduce students to the field of cultural anthropology by paying close attention to what anthropologists do and how they do it. The other is to explore some of the ways in which people organize their lives and construct systems of meaning -- from kin relations and gender roles to economic systems and marriage patterns, religion and healing. In the process, we will be challenged to think about the value of cultural diversity in an increasingly interconnected world and to see ourselves from others' point of view.  Credits: 3

  • ANTH 101: S/M/Exploratn-Human Diversity

    This course will introduce basic concepts and methods of anthropology. The four sub-disciplines of anthropology will contribute to an understanding of humans as biological and cultural beings. The focus of the course is to examine the diversity of human cultures, with a primary focus on the non-Western world.  Credits: 3

  • ANTH 105: S/Int to Physical Anthropology

    An introduction to physical/biological anthropology, i.e. the study of humans as biological organisms. The course explores relevant theories, methodologies, and contemporary issues within this subdiscipline of anthropology, via lectures, lab work, and workshops. Topics to be covered are human genetics, evolution, variation, growth and development, and behavioral ecology, as well as primate evolution and behavior. Offered every fall  Credits: 3

  • ANTH 110: Introduction to Archaeology

    An examination of how archaeologists generate and interpret knowledge about the human past based on data recovered from the archaeological record. Topics include exploring the fundamental methods and theories of archaeology including the role of science in understanding the past, the formation of the archaeological record, the measurement of archaeological variability in time, space, and form, the reconstruction of past social organization, and the understanding of prehistoric ideology. Offered every spring  Credits: 3

  • ANTH 120: S/Language & Culture

    An introduction to language as a part of culture and culture as a part of language. Topics include language and humanity, lexicon and cultural values, language acquisition and socialization, language and thought, and language as a means of communication and social discourse. Attention is called to the empirical and theoretical inspirations of language study for the study of culture and cross-cultural analysis. Offered every fall  Credits: 3

  • ANTH 188: Experimental:

    Credits: 1-6

  • ANTH 199: Directed Study

    Credits: 1-6

  • ANTH 201: Human Evolution

    An in-depth examination of human evolution using a multidimensional approach. Students will gain an understanding of the phylogenetic history of the hominids through lecture, lab work using our extensive fossil cast collection, and presentations/discussions. Topics that will be covered fall into the general categories of: (1) the fossil evidence, (2) environmental pressures driving the various stages of hominid evolution, (3) biological and behavioral adaptations, and (4) hominid culture. Prerequisite: ANTH 105. Offered every spring  Credits: 3

  • ANTH 202: M/Nutrition, Disease & Health

    Using Critical Social Theory and a biocultural perspective, this course explores the interplay between concepts of nutrition, health, illness and disease and the cultural contexts in which they are rooted. It addresses several issues, such as: explanatory models for the causes and treatments associated with illness and disease; the relationship between nutrition, growth and development and health; effects of globalization and environment on disease and health; and the way social inequalities, religious beliefs, and political-economic contexts influence disease prevalence and access to health care services. Offered every fall  Credits: 3

  • ANTH 204: Human Ecology

    An examination of human ecology within an evolutionary, biocultural, and cross-species/cross-cultural framework. The course is divided as follows: (1) history, theories, and methods of ecological anthropology and human behavioral ecology; (2) human biocultural adaptations to the various global biomes via lectures, films, ethnographies, and discussion; (3) the adaptive significance of human behavior from a crossspecies cross-species perspective, via assigned readings and discussion; (4) student presentations based upon individual research focused on relevant/related topics in human ecology; and (5) intertwined throughout is an ecosystemic consideration of the earth in relation to anthropogenic activities of the sustainability of our past, present, and future activities. Credits: 3(3-0) Offered every fall  Credits: 3

  • ANTH 207: S/M/Ancient Civ of North Amer

    This course will examine the rich diversity of ancient Pre-Columbian North American cultures, religions, political organizations, and social structures and the variety of regional North American responses to post-Pleistocene environmental change. Possible topics include: human migrations into the New World, Pre-Columbian cultures of the Arctic, sub-Arctic, Eastern Woodlands, Great Plains, Southwest, Great Basin-Plateau, and Pacific coast regions, hunter-gatherer lifestyles, the origin and expansion of food-producing economies, and the rise and fall of complex societies. Credits: 3(3-0). Offered once every three years, in the spring semester  Credits: 3

  • ANTH 208: M/Classics of Ethnography

    The best and most significant anthropological writings describing (primarily) non-Western ways of life are studied. Students review ethnographic accounts, including examples from all parts of the world, representing writings ranging from the nineteenth century to the present. Prerequisites: ANTH 100 or ANTH 101. Offered every spring  Credits: 3

  • ANTH 209: M/Ethnography of the Iroquois

    A study of the social organization and world-view of various Iroquoian groups, with special emphasis on Seneca-Iroquois of New York State during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Also covered are the position of Iroquois culture in the northeastern woodlands, its adaptability and persistence, and cultural vitality and contributions of Iroquois peoples. Prerequisites: ANTH 100 or ANTH 101. Offered fall, even years  Credits: 3

  • ANTH 211: M/Ethnography-North Am Indians

    This course is an introduction to the traditional cultures of Native North Americans. The rich diversity of Native American cultures will be examined in relation to environmental adaptation and as a legacy for contemporary Native American ethnic identity. Not offered on a regular basis  Credits: 3

  • ANTH 214: M/Ethnography-Southeast Asia

    A survey of the peoples and cultures of both mainland and island Southeast Asia. Emphasis is on ethnographic description of the area, with special focus on the cultural systems of selected groups in Burma, Thailand, Java, and Borneo. Offered spring, even years  Credits: 3

  • ANTH 215: S/M/Ancient Civ of Old World

    A study of the prehistoric cultures of Africa, Europe, Asia, and Australia. Focus is on Old World human origins, the evolution of human culture, Paleolithic cultural variability, the origin and expansion of food producing economies, and the rise and fall of state level societies. Specific attention will be given to interpretation of Oldowan and Acheulian sites, the Neanderthal question, and the development of complex forms of social organization in Greater Mesopotamia (i.e. the Fertile Crescent), Egypt, China, and India. Offered every spring  Credits: 3

  • ANTH 216: S/M/Race,Racism-BlackExpinAmer

    This course examines race, racism and the black experience in the Americas from an anthropological perspective. Comparing and contrasting the lived experiences of contemporary members of the African diaspora, it will examine issues such as: the scientific and social construction of race; racism and social and health inequality; whiteness and privilege; and blackness as an individual and social identity; and the intersection of race, gender, and class. The course also examines the relationship between identity and the production of cultural products such as music, dance, and religion across the Americas. Lastly, the course explores social justice movements and acts of resistance against discrimination and pervasive inequality. Readings, films, written assignments, and discussions, will underscore how the politics of race and ethnicity as well as the discourse on culture and identity, shape and influence social relations and individual experiences. Credits: 3(3-0) Offered every summer.  Credits: 3

  • ANTH 220: Intro Linguistic Analysis

    This course focuses on the structural analysis of language, with special emphasis on the techniques of descriptive linguistics, transformational grammar, and historical linguistics. Major topics include phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, and pragmatics. Skills are trained in sound transcription, phonemics, morphemics, and syntactic derivation for cross-linguistic comparison. Prerequisites: ANTH 120 or permission of instructor. Offered every spring  Credits: 3

  • ANTH 226: M/Ethnogrphy-LatinAm&Caribbean

    This course takes an anthropological approach to the study ofLatin America and the Caribbean, with a focus on Latin Americans of African descent. It briefly explores the people and culture of the region pre-contact with Europeans, and examines conquest, colonialism, and slavery, before taking an in-depth ethnographic approach to study contemporary regional themes and issues, such as: race, racism and identity, gender, ethnicity, multiculturalism, indigenous social movements, human rights, globalization, tourism, urbanization, religion, health and coping with illness, popular culture, and food. Credits: 3(3-0) Offered fall, even years, and summer (online), odd years.  Credits: 3

  • ANTH 229: S/M/Ethnography & Film

    This course is designed to explore ethnography and with a focus on the use of photography, film and video in the representation of individuals and groups. Students will be exposed to the history of ethnographic film and its current relationship to documentary and fiction film. What are the strengths and weakness of visual representations in anthropology compared to written representations? Students will be required to engage in data collection, analysis and interpretation in the production of a short ethnographic film and an accompanying website. Prerequisites: ANTH 100 or ANTH 101. Offered every fall  Credits: 3

  • ANTH 231: S/Sociolinguistics

    This course examines the intimate relationship between language and society. It will study micro-sociolinguistics, i.e., the way conversation correlates with social variables (class, gender, ethnicity, and education). The course will also focus on macro-sociolinguistics, i.e., linguistic engineering and language attitudes. Contemporary issues such as bilingualism, biculturalism, ethnic linguistic conflicts, and educational policies will be explored. Prerequisites: ANTH 120 or permission of instructor. Offered every fall  Credits: 3

  • ANTH 233: Primates

    An in-depth examination of primates with a special emphasis on behavior. Students will learn about the non-human primates of the world through lectures, assigned readings, films, and independent projects. Topics to be covered are primate evolution, taxonomy, ecology, behavior, social organization/group life, cognition, and research. Offered every spring  Credits: 3

  • ANTH 235: S/M/Ancnt Civ-Mesomerica&Andes

    A study of pre-Columbian societies in Middle America and South America. Focus is on the evolution of early hunting and gathering peoples through state organization. Major transformations in cultural evolution are treated (the domestication process, urbanization and the rise of the state). Alternative cultural and social systems are explored through analysis and interpretation of archaeological data. Offered every fall  Credits: 3

  • ANTH 238: Ethnomedicine-LatnAm&Caribbean

    This course takes an anthropological approach to the study of "folk" and "traditional" health beliefs and practices in Latin America and the Caribbean. It focuses on cross-cultural notions of the body, health and illness, and healing practices. This course also examines the effects of globalization on local conceptions of health, illness, and approaches to healing. Offered fall, even years  Credits: 3

  • ANTH 288: Experimental:

    Credits: 0-4

  • ANTH 299: Directed Study

    Credits: 1-6

  • ANTH 301: M/Religion, Society & Culture

    A survey of the theories of religion based on a comparative study of ethnographic evidence from Western and non-Western cultures. Emphasis is on the cognitive roots, social functions, psychological impact, and cultural meanings of religion. The relevance of religion to the contemporary world in a time of modernization and globalization is probed, so is the nature of fundamentalism from a historical as well as contemporary perspective. Prerequisites: ANTH 100 or ANTH 101 or permission of instructor. Offered spring, odd years  Credits: 3

  • ANTH 302: Medical Anthropology

    This course explores the cultural, social, economic, political, and environmental factors that affect health and well- being-as well as the practice of healing and medicine-across cultures. We will use theories and methods from critical medical anthropology to examine the social determinants of health and health inequality. Prerequisites: ANTH 202 or permission of instructor. Credits: 3(3-0). Offered every Spring.  Credits: 3

  • ANTH 305: Field Meth&Tech in Linguistics

    Methods and techniques are offered in the traditions of structuralism to provide practical guidance for investigators of language in the field, where they collect data from living speakers. Topics include the theoretical underpinnings and discovery procedure of field linguistics, informant selection, sample building, data elicitation, file management, preliminary data analysis, and issues of relationship, etc. Prerequisites: ANTH 120 and ANTH 220 or permission of instructor. Offered every spring  Credits: 3

  • ANTH 306: Human Growth & Development

    This course explores human growth and development from genetic, physiological, anatomical, cultural, and socio-economic perspectives. The main topics include the history of growth studies, genetic and environmental effects on growth, typical human growth patterns during all life stages, and the evolution of human growth patterns. Prerequisites: ANTH 202. Credits: 3(3-0) Offered every spring.  Credits: 3

  • ANTH 307: Third World Development

    This course uses case studies, analyses and critiques of development programs, and class discussions to explore definitions of development" and "Third World" the dominant paradigms and ideologies that influence social, political and economic strategies in Third World countries the "cost" of development for receiving countries, the significance of globalization and the dynamics between dependency, power relationships, and poverty. Offered every fall  Credits: 3

  • ANTH 309: Topics-Phys Anth:

    This course will cover various topics in physical anthropology. Topics will rotate but will fall into the following categories: human ecology, primate behavior and ecology, human evolution, primate evolution, human anatomy, or primate anatomy. May be taken twice under different subtitles. Prerequisites: ANTH 201 or 204 or 233. Credits: 3(3-0) Offered every spring  Credits: 3

  • ANTH 312: Archaeology,Art,Arch-Cusco Reg

    This study abroad course is an overview of the archaeology and colonial history of the Cusco (Peru) Region. The course begins with an online component with intensive reading and online testing, followed by three weeks in Cusco itself. Coursework traces the evolution of the area's cultural complexity culminating in the rise and conquest of the Inca empire and then focuses on the art and architecture of the Spanish colonial era until Peru?s independence in 1821. Students will attend lectures and field trips to local museums, galleries, archaeological sites, and historical places. Credits: 3(3-0) Offered during intersession or summer sessions, every third year.  Credits: 3

  • ANTH 313: Global Health Issues

    This course examines the effects of globalization on the health of people around the globe and relates disparities in the spread of preventable diseases and access to basic health services to thegrowing inequality between rich and poor nations. The course draws from contemporary global health research to explore issues such as, the spread of infectious and chronic disease, food and water insecurity, environmental health, and the effects of violence and war on global health. The theoretical perspectives used to analyze these issues draws on the work of critical medical anthropology, ecosocial epidemiology, applied anthropology, and public health. Prerequisites: ANTH 100 or ANTH 101 or ANTH 202. Credits: 3(3-0). Offered every spring.  Credits: 3

  • ANTH 314: Topics in Linguistics:

    This course explores major issues of topical or theoretical importance in linguistic anthropology. The variety of rotating or one-time topics in linguistics reflect topics of general interest or importance and/or the interests and needs of students, and/or the research expertise of faculty members. May be taken twice under different subtitles. Prerequisites: ANTH 120 or permission of the instructor. Offered fall, even years  Credits: 3

  • ANTH 316: Human Ecology

    An examination of human ecology within an evolutionary, biocultural, and cross-species/cross-cultural framework. The course is divided as follows: (1) history, theories, and methods of ecological anthropology and human behavioral ecology; (2) human biocultural adaptations to the various global biomes via lectures, films, ethnographies, and discussion; (3) the adaptive significance of human behavior from a cross-species perspective, via assigned readings and discussion; (4) student presentations based upon individual research focused on relevant/related topics in human ecology; and (5) intertwined throughout is consideration of the sustainability of our past, present, and future activities. Prerequisites: ANTH 105 or ENVR 124. Credits: 3(3-0) Offered every fall  Credits: 3

  • ANTH 317: Human Osteology

    An in-depth introduction to the human skeleton via lecture, lab work using our extensive skeletal collection, and individual research. Topics to be explored are (1) anatomy, growth and development, biomechanics, pathologies, and aging and sexing of the human skeleton and (2) forensic theories and methodologies. Prerequisites: ANTH 105 or BIOL 103 or BIOL 116. Credits: 3(3-0) Offered every spring  Credits: 3

  • ANTH 318: M/Gender&Sexuality-Latin Amer

    An anthropological overview of gender and sexuality in Latin America from prehistory to the current day. Readings and student projects will change yearly to address topics including pre-contact concepts of gender and sexuality, changes in ideas and practices with European contact, and contemporary ethnographic studies of gender and sexuality in the region. Prerequisites: ANTH 100 or ANTH 101. Credits: 3(3-0) Offered fall, even years  Credits: 3

  • ANTH 320: Archaeology Field School

    An introduction to basic field methods in archaeology. The course is primarily designed for anthropology students and/or those students interested in pursuing archaeological fieldwork as either a career or life experience. It emphasizes hands-on learning, and teaches basic excavation and surveying techniques, stratigraphic analysis, record keeping, data processing, horizontal and vertical mapping techniques, local and regional culture history, and implementation of excavation research designs. Field sites are typically off campus and may require students to camp. There is a program fee to cover transportation, housing, and equipment. Prerequisites: ANTH 110 or permission of instructor. Offered summers  Credits: 3-6

  • ANTH 323: Primate Field School

    Standard methods of primatological research applied in the field, including research design and data collection. Data collection may be conducted at various research sites. Topics to be considered primarily fall into the categories of primate behavior and ecology. Prerequisites: ANTH 233 and permission of instructor. Offered during intersession as scheduled by Study Abroad Office  Credits: 3

  • ANTH 325: International Fieldwork:

    Standard methods of research will be applied in the field, including research design and data collection. Data collection may be conducted at various research sites. Topics in the course will be specific to region and targeted subdiscipline in anthropology. Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. Offered by individual arrangement  Credits: 1-6

  • ANTH 328: Sec Lang Acquistn&Culture Lrng

    A survey of the major concerns and theories of applied linguistics. Emphasis is on various analyses of first and second language acquisition in general and the communicative and functional approaches in particular. Major topics include the developmental stages of language acquisition, the differences between first and second language acquisition, language universals and core grammar, interlanguage, and culture learning in the second language classroom, etc. Prerequisites: ANTH 120 or permission of instructor. Offered fall, odd years  Credits: 3

  • ANTH 334: Social Anthropology

    The contributions of Social Anthropology are examined in detail, from intellectual foundations to culmination in the late twentieth century. The unique ethnographic contributions of Social Anthropology receive special emphasis as does its role in the development of modern anthropology. Prerequisites: ANTH 100 or ANTH 101. Credits: 3(3-0). Offered fall, odd years  Credits: 3

  • ANTH 336: Forensic Anthropology

    This course provides an overview of the goals and methods of forensic anthropology, which is the study of human remains relating to matters of law. Students will learn how to evaluate the forensic context as well as how to establish a biological profile of an individual (sex, age, ancestry and stature). Special attention will also be paid to determining pathological anomalies, evidence of trauma, and time since death, as well as learning crime scene investigation procedures. Prerequisites: ANTH 105 or BIOL 103 or BIOL 116 or permission of the instructor. Credits: 3(3- 0). Offered every spring and online every summer  Credits: 3

  • ANTH 337: Art & Material Culture

    The things the people make and use, from fine art to consumer goods, provide valuable information on cultural ideas and practices. This course approaches art and material culture from an interdisciplinary perspective, across cultures and through time. Current theoretical approaches to art and material culture will be examined and applied to specific objects. Prerequisites: ANTH 100 or ANTH 101 or ANTH 110. Credits: 3(3-0) Offered spring, even years  Credits: 3

  • ANTH 343: Cross-Cul Persp-Women's Health

    This course explores the context of women's lives and challenges to women's health across cultures. This course uses theories and methods from cultural anthropology and related social and health sciences to explain both the position of women in different societies and the connection between race, class, culture and gender roles, and to understand how cultural, social, economic, political, environmental and behavioral factors affect women's health across cultures. This course emphasizes the importance of examining women's health concerns in local as well as global contexts. Prerequisites: ANTH 100 or ANTH 101 or ANTH 202. Credits: 3(3-0) Offered fall even years  Credits: 3

  • ANTH 346: Topics in Archaeology:

    This course explores archaeological studies of major topical or theoretical importance. The variety of rotating or one-time topics in archaeology reflect topics of general interest or importance within the study of archaeology, and/or the interests and needs of students, and/or the research expertise of faculty members. May be taken twice under different subtitles. Prerequisites: ANTH 101, ANTH 110 or permission of the instructor. Not offered on a regular basis  Credits: 3

  • ANTH 360: Myths&Folktales of Native Amer

    A survey of both traditional and contemporary Native American and Arctic people's folktales, myths, legends, and lore, including extensive description and reading of source material, with emphasis on North American cultures. Major topics include creation myths, nature tales, trickster tales, the role of oral literature in Native American cultures, and analysis of myth and folklore. Prerequisites: ANTH 100 or ANTH 101 and at least one other ANTH course of 200 level or higher. Credits: 3(3-0) Offered every fall  Credits: 3

  • ANTH 380: Topics-Cul Anthro:

    This course explores cultural anthropological topics of applied, ethnographic, or theoretical importance. Rotating or one-time topics in cultural anthropology reflect general topics of interest or importance and/or the research expertise of faculty. May be taken twice under different subtitles. Prerequisites: ANTH 100 or ANTH 101. Credits: 3(3-0). Not offered on a regular basis.  Credits: 3

  • ANTH 382: Ethnographic Field Methods

    In this course, students learn the science and art of anthropological field methods, including participant observation, qualitative interviews, and visual ethnographic methods. Students acquire the skills to design and conduct an individual research project on a social issue of their choosing. The course also covers topics such as the ethics of fieldwork, gender in the field, and the use of ethnographic field methods in community participatory research. Prerequisites: ANTH 202 or ANTH 208 or ANTH 229. Credits: 3(3-0) Offered fall odd years.  Credits: 3

  • ANTH 383: Archaeological Method & Theory

    An introduction to research in archaeology with an emphasis on the connections between method and theory. The course emphasizes research design, methods of artifact classification and analysis, and fundamental statistical methods. These topics and methods are approached through a combination of readings/lectures, written assignments on archaeological problems, demonstrations, and some laboratory work. Prerequisites: ANTH 110 and (ANTH 207 or ANTH 215 or ANTH 235).Offered spring, odd years  Credits: 3

  • ANTH 388: Experimental:

    Credits: 1-6

  • ANTH 395: Internship

    The internship will provide students with practical experience working in one of a wide range of public sector organizations. Relevant readings and a written project are also required.(3-15 semester hours as arranged). Offered: by individual arrangement Prerequisites: junior or senior standing, 6 hours in Anthropology, minimum 2.75 gpa, approval by agency supervisor and Anthropology Department internship coordinator. Offered by individual arrangement  Credits: 1-15

  • ANTH 399: Directed Study

    Intensive readings and research in anthropology under the supervision of a member of the faculty. (1 to 3 semester hours). Prerequisites: ANTH 100 and permission of instructor. Offered by individual arrangement  Credits: 0-6

  • ANTH 402: Sociomedical Sciences Capstone

    This course is an in-depth examination of research in the Sociomedical sciences. Students read, think critically about, and discuss contemporary interdisciplinary research studies on health and medicine from across the globe. Students also learn how to design and conduct a qualitative study of an issue related to health, disease and/or medicine. Prerequisites: ANTH 302. Credits: 3(3-0) Offered every fall.  Credits: 3

  • ANTH 410: Classical Theory-Anthropology

    An intensive investigation of the development of theory in anthropology, offering advanced students a unified perspective on the discipline of anthropology as a whole. The course is designed to enable students to critique classic readings in anthropological theory, review commentary on these materials and summarize central concepts in the field of Anthropology Prerequisites: (ANTH 208 or ANTH 229) and senior standing. Offered every fall  Credits: 3

  • ANTH 421: Contemporary Theory in Anth

    An intensive investigation of the development of method and theory in Anthropology. The course is designed to enable students to critique contemporary readings (post-1950) in anthropological theory, review in depth commentary on these materials, and summarize central concepts that are current in the field of Anthropology. Prerequisites: (ANTH 208 or ANTH 229) and senior standing. Offered every spring.  Credits: 3

  • ANTH 488: Experimental:

    Credits: 1-6

  • ANTH 493: Honors Research/Writing

    One semester of individual research, followed by one semester of writing and the presentation of a thesis to the Department. The thesis is to be directed by a faculty member of the Department of Anthropology. To be eligible to enroll in the research course students must have a minimum 3.70 cumulative grade point average. To begin the research course, students must have completed at least 90 credits, at least 30 of which must be within the major. Invitation to participate will be offered by the Department. Please note that taking this course for two semesters will fulfill the students Transformational Learning requirement for the major. Prerequisite: Permission of Department. Offered by individual arrangement  Credits: 3

  • ANTH 499: Directed Study:

    Credits: 1-6

  • ANTH 515: Iroquois Field School

    Background lectures and readings, combined with site visits and studies of the Indian, particularly Seneca-Iroquois, occupation of the Genesee Valley and adjacent regions, from Late Woodland times to the Nineteenth Century; emphasis is on specific sites and locales of prominence in Iroquois life and history, especially community and reservation sites north and south along the Genesee River from Geneseo; site visits, on-site research, surface surveys, mapping, documentary studies, local history, and ethnohistory are all used to supplement traditional approaches to knowledge of the Iroquois of the Genesee country. Offered: when demand is sufficient  Credits: 3

  • ANTH 526: NativeVoices:Mesoamerica&Andes

    A comparative review of the sources and the social history of pre-Hispanic societies at the time of contact with Europeans and during the early colonial period. Emphasis is on the institutions and ideologies and the variations in social, economic, and political patterns that developed in different areas and in different times. Offered: summer  Credits: 3

  • ANTH 535: Early Civilization in Americas

    A study of pre-Columbian societies in Middle America and South America. Focus is on the evolution of early farming societies through state organization. Major transformations in cultural evolution are treated (The domestication process, urbanization and the rise of the state). Alternative cultural and social systems are explored through analysis and interpretation of archaeological data. Offered: summer  Credits: 3

  • ANTH 599: Directed Study:

    Credits: 1-12

  • ANTH TRE: Anthropology Elective

    Credits: 0-6