New Baccalaureate Degree Requirements: A Geneseo Education for a Connected World

This curriculum is effective Fall 2022 for all incoming students.

Students who enter in Catalog Years prior to Fall 2022 may fulfill a reduced set of requirements for the general education requirements effective in the catalogue year in which they entered, or they may change their catalogue year to fulfill the new general education. Waivers will likely be needed by continuing students to most efficiently complete one or the other general education program. General Education waivers may be initiated by your advisor or the DAPA office.

Introduction

A Geneseo education affords perspectives and skills to engage the complexities and possibilities of a globally connected world. Students encounter broad areas of knowledge, become specialists in a particular discipline, develop habits of critical inquiry and civic participation, reflect on their learning, and reach beyond themselves by exploring the diversity of human experiences, cultures, and viewpoints. In addition to meeting SUNY's General Education requirements, our program aligns with Geneseo's Learning Outcomes for Baccalaureate Education (GLOBE), our Mission, Vision and Values, our Community Commitment to Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion, and our commitment to being an antiracist college. 

Specialized Knowledge: The Major

Major programs prepare students for life-long success by taking them deep into a discipline's domain of knowledge and methods; cultivating skills in ​​Critical Thinking​​, ​​Informational & Digital Literacy​​, and discipline-specific practices of ​​Written and Oral Communication​ and ​​Leadership & Collaboration;​ and, in many cases, putting knowledge into action by engaging with real-world issues via ​​Integrative and Applied Learning​​ experiences.

Broad Knowledge, Intellectual and Practical Skills

To participate in the social, political, and ethical dimensions of society, and to work toward a more just, equitable, and sustainable world, students need broad knowledge and a set of common skills. (see details below)

Integrative and Applied Learning

Geneseo has an institutional commitment to both transformational learning experiences and a rich co-curricular life. Integrative learning fosters the ability to connect and combine knowledge and skills acquired through the curriculum and co-curriculum to new, complex situations within and beyond the college. This approach allows students to reflect on the ways that such knowledge is utilized and places them on a fast track for continuing success (see details below)

Program Outline

Requirements

Credits

General Education Curriculum

30-41

Liberal Arts and Sciences Major or Professional Program

(In some majors, related requirements with different department prefixes may overlap with general education requirements; see details under departmental listings)

30 or more

Integrative and Applied Learning

0 or more

Electives: selected under advisement

(may include minors, second majors, microcredentials, certification programs, and free electives)

___

 

 

Total Degree Program:

120 credits minimum

Requirements for Baccalaureate Degree Program 

Click above for information on majors, outside major requirements, limits on activity courses, and other policies governing baccalaureate degree programs.

General Education Curriculum: Broad Knowledge, Intellectual and Practical Skills

7-10 courses; 30-41 credits (NOTE: All students must earn a minimum of 30 credits to satisfy SUNY General Education requirements.) Students who complete the specific course requirements for Broad Knowledge and Intellectual and Practical Skills with fewer than 30 credits must take additional courses from any General Education area to reach 30 credits required to satisfy SUNY General Education.

Seamless Transfer is affirmed: Students transferring to Geneseo having completed an AA or AS within SUNY (or 60 credit hours and SUNY GER), thereby completing SUNY GER, will face no "local" General Education requirements.

To participate in the social, political, and ethical dimensions of society, and to work toward a more just, equitable, and sustainable world, students need broad knowledge and a set of common skills.

1. ​Communication ​

Recognizing the importance of written communication, and respectful and productive discussion for learning, inclusivity, and social change, all students complete

  • One course in ​Basic Communication​ (3-4 credits)
  • Coursework in a single ​Language other than English​ through the second elementary level (0-8 credits)

2. Scientific Literacy ​

Recognizing the importance of being able to understand, evaluate, and replicate quantitative and symbolic forms of reasoning as the basis of scientific arguments built on empirical evidence, in order to work ethically with technology and contribute to a scientifically informed society, all students complete:

  • One course in ​Quantitative, Computational, Symbolic Reasoning​ (3-4 credits)
  • One course in ​Natural Science​, to include a lab component (4-5 credits*)

* 3-5 credits for transfer students (i.e., students with “Transfer” admit type only

3. Participation in a Global Society

Recognizing that we live in a world informed by diverse historical and contemporary systems of value, meaning, power, and privilege; that various disciplines offer their own insights into these systems and the issues that arise from them; and that ethical participation in a global society requires that we understand and engage with these systems and issues actively and responsibly, all students complete courses in the following five categories.

In selecting courses, students complete at least one course each in the Arts, Humanities, and Social Sciences. At least one course includes DEI (diversity, equity, and inclusion) and antiracist content.

  • One course in ​Diversity, Pluralism, and Power​: Students understand (i) the diversity of identities that characterizes the United States; (ii) the ways in which systems of power lead to different outcomes for members of diverse groups; (iii) the reasoning and impact of one's personal beliefs and actions; and (iv) how to participate effectively in pluralistic contexts (e.g., by communicating and collaborating across difference). (3-4 credits)
  • One course in ​World Cultures and Values​: Students (i) understand systems of value and meaning as embodied in one or more cultures from different regions of the world; and (ii) assess interconnections among/across local and global systems and cultures. Courses in this category engage extensively with the past and/or present in cultures outside Europe and the United States (though they may also engage with content from cultures located within those regions, e.g., Native/Indigenous cultures). (3-4 credits)
  • One course in ​Contemporary Global Challenges​: Students (i) understand local and global networks, systems, and interdependencies; and (ii) apply global perspectives in addressing challenges and solving problems. (3-4 credits)
  • One course in ​Creativity and Innovation​​: Students understand and reflect on (i) creative expression, art, and invention as foundational to culture and inclusive societal betterment; and (ii) the relationship between individual creative work or innovation and wider contexts. (3-4 credits)
  • One course in ​Sustainability​: Students understand and reflect on (i) the environmental, economic, and/or social dimensions of sustainability and how they relate to each other; and (ii) how these three dimensions shape our changing planet. (3-4 credits)

Notes on Participation in a Global Society Section

  • Coursework completed in other academic divisions of the College may be used to satisfy these areas.
  • Double-dipping is permitted once in the five "Participation in a Global Society" areas; that is, one course may be taken to satisfy two of the "Participation in a Global Society" areas.
  • No more than one course from a student's primary major may be used to satisfy "Participation in a Global Society" area requirements.
  • Courses used to satisfy the "Communication" and "Scientific Literacy" requirements cannot double dip for "Participation in a Global Society."

Integrative and Applied Learning

Geneseo has an institutional commitment to both transformational learning experiences and a rich co-curricular life. Integrative learning fosters the ability to connect and combine knowledge and skills acquired through the curriculum and co-curriculum to new complex situations within and beyond the college. This approach allows students to reflect on the ways that such knowledge is utilized and places them on a fast track for continuing success.

All students will document an integrative or applied learning experience (whether within the major or outside of it—even via the co-curriculum) that reflects the GLOBE learning outcomes in this area before graduation.

In line with best practices in integrative and applied learning, the criteria for the integrative or applied learning experience are:

  • Structured, Intentional, and Authentic Experiences​: Integrative and applied learning experiences should include a course syllabus or learning contract between parties and should have hands-on and/or real-world elements.
  • Preparation, Orientation, and Training​: Integrative and applied learning experiences should include sufficient background and foundational education and should include expectations that are expressed as learning outcomes that structure the experience and ongoing work.
  • Monitoring and Continuous Improvement​: Integrative and applied learning experiences should include in-experience mechanisms for feedback, course correction, quality monitoring, and evaluation of progress towards the state learning outcomes.
  • Structured Reflection​: Integrative and applied learning should include opportunities for students to self-assess, analyze, and examine their experience and to evaluate the outcomes. Reflection should demonstrate relevance and should form connections with previous experiences and/or future planning as well as a demonstration of one of Geneseo's core values: Civic Engagement, Sustainability, Inclusivity, Learning, or Creativity.
  • Evaluation​: Students must receive appropriate and timely feedback from the project organizer.

Questions? Contact your advisor or the Office of the Dean of Academic Planning and Advising in Erwin 106 or at 585-245-5541.