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Harry Howe

Professor, Accounting; Director, Geneseo MS Accounting; Accounting Coordinator
South Hall 107
585-245-5465
howeh@geneseo.edu

Harry Howe teaches Intermediate Financial Accounting, Accounting Theory and Research and electives in Fund Accounting and Financial Statement Analysis. He is the Director of Geneseo's MS Accounting Program and Accounting Coordinator. Howe is faculty advisor to the Accounting Society, actively involved in student co-curricular activities, and holds positions on approximately fifteen school- and campus-wide committees and programs. He serves on the boards of the Rochester FEI, NYSSCPA and IMA chapters and is past president of the Northeast Region of the American Accounting Association.

Professor Howe has research interests in the areas of business valuations and in the development of applied instructional material for students and practitioners. He has published two book-length monographs on receivables with BNA and numerous articles in scholarly and practitioner journals.

Prior to completing his doctoral studies, Howe worked for many years as general manager of an NYC-based construction firm that specialized in high-end interiors, and as a Broker-Associate for a regional commercial real estate firm. His personal interests include bicycling, hiking & rock climbing, reading (history, urbanism & finance-related) and jazz. His wife, Lauren, is a graphic artist, and they have two sons: Benjamin, an officer in the USMC and Noah, a political science graduate student.

Office Hours

Spring 2020

Monday & Wednesday:  1:00 pm - 2:30 pm or by appointment.

Curriculum Vitae

Education

  • B.A., Brown University

  • M.B.A., Graduate Management Institute, Union College

  • Ph.D, Union College

Affiliations

  • American Accounting Association

  • Board member, Rochester Chapter FEI

  • Chair, NYSSCPA World of Accounting

  • Past President, American Accounting Association Northeast Region

More About Me

Research Interests

Professor Howe has research interests in the areas of business valuations and in the development of applied instructional material for students and practitioners. He has published two book-length monographs on receivables with BNA and numerous articles in scholarly and practitioner journals.

Professor Howe is currently working on a set of case studies and other student-centered, active learning materials coauthored with Geneseo faculty colleague Professor Rick Gifford and with several past students from his Financial Statement Analysis and Intermediate Financial Accounting classes. 

Interests

Reading (currently working my way through 9,000 pages of the Penguin series on European history, from Troy to Potsdam), cycling (never as many miles as I’d like) and travel (about three dozen countries and 49 states, so far).   Sometimes I can combine all three, as in a recent summer trip to France spent bicycling through the landscape of the Meuse-Argonne offensive, finding villages and other locations mentioned in my grandfather’s memoir of his Army service 1917-18.

Awards & Recognition

Professor Howe was Geneseo’s 2017 recipient of the SUNY Chancellor’s Award for Excellence in Teaching.  He has received awards from the School of Business for Research, Service and for Teaching, and Best Manuscript awards from the American Accounting Association (Mideast Region), SECRA and ABSEL.

Courses Taught

  • Financial Statement Analysis (ACCT 315, FIN 315, FIN 530)
  • Intermediate Financial Accounting II (ACCT 302)
  • Accounting Theory and Research (ACCT 530)
  • Howe also teaches occasional sections Humanities 220 (HUMN I) and HONR 206.  He supervises numerous Directed Studies in accounting topics and Edgar Fellows honors theses.

Classes

  • ACCT 315: Financial Statement Analysis

    This course is an in-depth study of financial statements, with particular emphasis on using a combination of accounting numbers and information from other sources to estimate the value of corporate securities. The course advances a perspective that financial accounting sometimes describes, and sometimes obscures, the fundamental economic activities of the firm. Topics include business strategy and its impact on financial statements, the qualities and limitations of accounting information, earnings quality and earnings management, making adjustments to financial statements, using supplemental disclosure, off-balance-sheet financing, forecasting, proformas, and the use of financial statement information in valuation models. Also cross registered as FNCE 315. Prerequisites: FNCE 311. Restricted to School of Business majors. Others may seek permission from the School of Business. Offered when demand is sufficient

  • FNCE 315: Financial Statement Analysis

    This course is an in-depth study of financial statements, with particular emphasis on using a combination of accounting numbers and information from other sources to estimate the value of corporate securities. The course advances a perspective that financial accounting sometimes describes, and sometimes obscures, the fundamental economic activities of the firm. Topics include business strategy and its impact on financial statements, the qualities and limitations of accounting information, earnings quality and earnings management, making adjustments to financial statements, using supplemental disclosure, off-balance-sheet financing, forecasting, proformas, and the use of financial statement information in valuation models. Also cross registered as ACCT 315. Restricted to School of Business majors. Others may seek permission from the School of Business. Prerequisites: FNCE 311 and junior or senior status.

  • FNCE 530: Strategic Equity Valuation

    This course presents a comprehensive introduction to methods of equity valuation with particular emphasis on the role of accounting information and strategic business factors in the pricing of corporate securities. Financial models covered in this class include Free Cash Flow, Residual Income, Market-to-Book and Multiples-based approaches. The course examines techniques of risk analysis relevant to the estimation of appropriate discount rates and expected cash flows. Restrictions: Accounting Graduate Student