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Sarah Brookes

Assistant Professor
Blake B 116
585-245-6332
brookes@geneseo.edu
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Sarah E. Brookes has been a member of the Geneseo faculty since 2015.

Office Hours Fall 2021

Tuesdays 1:00 pm to 3:00 pm and Thursdays; 1:30 pm to 2:30 pm

Or by appointment

Curriculum Vitae

Education

  • Ph.D., The Ohio State University (2013)

  • M.A., The Ohio State University (2010)

  • B.A., Mount Union College (2007)

Publications

  • Ellithorpe, M. E., & Brookes, S. E. (2018). I didn’t see that coming: Spoilers, fan theories, and their influence on enjoyment and parasocial breakup distress during a series finale. Psychology of Popular Media Culture, 7(3), 250–263.

  • Ellithorpe, M., Brookes, S., & Ewoldsen, D. R. (2016). So close and yet so far: Construal level moderates cultivation effects. Media Psychology, 19(1), 27-48.

  • Moyer-Gusé, E., Mahood, C., & Brookes, S. (2011). Entertainment-education in the context of humor: Effects on safe-sex intentions and risk perceptions. Health Communication, 26, 765-774.

Research Interests

Dr. Brookes' research explores the processing and effects of various media, particularly entertainment in the form of films, television, and video games. Her most recent research has focused on the intersection of television and the internet, with specific studies addressing how binge watching and online discussion of fan theories can affect narrative processing and emotional response.

Classes

  • COMN 251: Mass Media & Society

    This course assesses the evolving and dynamic relationship between mass media and society. Particular attention is paid to how mass mediated messages can define social and cultural realities and the interplay of social influences on these messages. By applying theoretical concepts, students critically examine how mass media function in various contexts, from local communities, national industries and politics, to global systems. Current and past research perspectives are discussed and analyzed.

  • COMN 354: Adv Issues:Media Entertainment

    This course focuses on a topic or related group of topics relevant to mediated communication. Research in the area of mediated communication will be applied and discussed. The course may integrate both theories and practical applications.

  • COMN 380: Communication Research

    This course provides an overview of the major trends in contemporary communication research. Areas of focus include quantitative and qualitative methods for researching communication problems in interpersonal and organizational contexts.

Courses Taught

COMN 160 : S/Intro to Mass Communication

This course is designed to survey mass communication in both historical and contemporary contexts. Students are introduced to the broad function of mass media, as well as the specific function of each medium. The roles of technology and the impact of mass communication on society and individuals are also explored.

COMN 251 : Mass Media & Society

This course assesses the evolving and dynamic relationship between mass media and society. Particular attention is paid to how mass mediated messages can define social and cultural realities and the interplay of social influences on these messages. By applying theoretical concepts, students critically examine how mass media function in various contexts, from local communities, national industries and politics, to global systems. Current and past research perspectives are discussed and analyzed. Prerequisites: COMN 160.

COMN 354 : Adv Iss-Mediated Comm: Media Entertainment

Entertainment has become an important interest area within the field of communication. Given the overwhelming portion of Americans' leisure time dedicated to entertainment consumption, scientific inquiry in this area is a necessity. In this course we will explore speculation, theory, and research regarding the uses and effects of entertainment with respect to reading, playing, and watching all sorts of entertainment fare. Readings and lectures will consider work on effects and appeal of media entertainment, emphasizing emotional reactions. Topics include key concepts of entertainment research, and the respective features and emotional/social-psychological effects of genres such as comedy, mystery, suspense, sports, music, horror, and news. This class counts toward the Journalism & Media track. Prerequisites: COMN 102, 103, 107 and 160 or permission of instructor.

COMN 354 : Adv Iss-Mediated Comm: Mass Media and Youth

In this course, we will explore processing and effects of various media offerings. Specific topics that will be offered include perception of, attention to, and comprehension of media stimuli, entertainment-education, and advertising. Readings and class discussions will address film, television, video games, the internet, and a wide range of other media. Students should end the course with a greater understanding of the psychological processes that occur during media use, as well as increased knowledge of the effects these processes might have on media consumers. This class counts toward the Journalism & Media track. Prerequisites: COMN 102, 103, 107 and 160 or permission of instructor.

COMN 354 : Adv Iss-Mediated Comm: Media Ethics

It is essential for people to understand the application of ethical principles in media. Informed application of these principles can elevate the credibility of media professionals; knowledge of these principles helps the consumer hold the media accountable. Students will learn foundational theories of ethics and apply them to ethical dilemmas in media. We will explore the similarities and differences among ethical issues across different communication settings. By the end of the course, students should know how to make and effectively communicate ethical media choices. This class counts toward the Journalism & Media track and the Intercultural & Critical Studies track. Prerequisites: COMN 102, 103, 107 and 160 or permission of instructor.

COMN 354 : Adv Iss-Mediated Comm: Mass Media and the Individual

In this course, we will explore processing and effects of various media offerings. Specific topics that will be offered include perception of, attention to, and comprehension of media stimuli, entertainment-education, and advertising. Readings and class discussions will address film, television, video games, the internet, and a wide range of other media. Students should end the course with a greater understanding of the psychological processes that occur during media use, as well as increased knowledge of the effects these processes might have on media consumers. This class counts toward the Journalism & Media track. Prerequisites: COMN 102, 103, 107 and 160 or permission of instructor.

COMN 380 : Communication Research

This course provides an overview of the major trends in contemporary communication research. Areas of focus include quantitative and qualitative methods for researching communication problems in interpersonal and organizational contexts. Prerequisites: junior or senior standing, COMN 103 and COMN 160, and a minimum 3.00 average in the major, or permission of instructor.