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Anti-Racism Courses

Spring 2021 Anti-racism Course listing

This listing is alphabetical by course. Its purpose is to assist students in locating courses or sections with anti-racist content and/or pedagogy. Faculty have submitted courses and described the content and the course design/pedagogy; any questions about a course should be directed to the instructor.

The college adopted the following definition of "anti-racism" in a cultivating community dialogue in fall 2020. Anti-racism is the “active process of identifying and eliminating racism by changing systems, organizational structures, policies and practices and attitudes, so that power is redistributed and shared equitably.” (from the National Action Committee on the Status of Women International Perspectives: Women and Global Solidarity) 

Prefix, number, and title of the course  Faculty name Subtitle, or special section of an existing class How course is anti-racist in content and/or design Anti-racist practices in design and/or pedagogy
ANTH 100 Cultural Anthropology James Aimers Section 05 (although all sections of ANTH 100 probably qualify as anti-racist) About 3 weeks of the course is spent reading and discussing race and ethnicity in the course text. We also spend several classes discussing a required 150-page ethnography of a Mexican immigrant network in Chicago. The major essay is based on an interview each student completes with an immigrant. This course gives students the theoretical background to understand concepts like race, ethnicity, nationalism, and white privilege. They then read about these issues in the daily lives of real people in an ethnography, and apply some of these ideas in classroom discussions and a final essay based on an interview with an immigrant to the US.
ANTH 100 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology Jennifer Guzmán 56840 This course looks both in the US and at international, cross-cultural cases to critically examine processes including racialization and the criminalization of migration that create and reproduce inequities, especially for Black, indigenous and other people of color. Students write about ways to identify and challenge these dynamics at national and local levels. acknowledge the role and impact of race and racism on the construction of knowledge in their discipline and beyond,, identify the ways racism contributes to racial inequities that limit and/or prevent equal access and opportunities,
ANTH 101 Explorations in Human Diversity Marie-Lorraine Pipes   The cultural anthropology and archaeology modules explore the foundations of racism, the systems that perpetuate racism and discrimination, and the social movements and organizations that work to change systemic oppression in America. acknowledge the role and impact of race and racism on the construction of knowledge in their discipline and beyond,, identify the ways racism contributes to racial inequities that limit and/or prevent equal access and opportunities,, center the lived experiences of BIPOC that provides a wide range of narratives that illustrate resistance, resiliency, joy, and oppression,, promote a classroom environment of equitable practices to ensure the academic success of all students,, embed skill sets and course goals that provide students with the tools to become antiracist citizens in a democratic society
ANTH 105 Introduction to Physical Anthropology Lisa Danish   There will be a Module specifically devoted to anti-racism, that will include identifying how our discipline has promoted racism. Units covered in the Module will include Race and Racism in Anthropology (covering the Biology of Race, the History of Scientific Racism, and Health Outcomes Resulting from Racism) and Indigenous Perspectives on Anthropology (covering Indigenous rights and NAGPRA, and Indigenous views on relatedness and belonging using Indigenous writings on the Elizabeth Warren/Cherokee case as an example). acknowledge the role and impact of race and racism on the construction of knowledge in their discipline and beyond,, identify the ways racism contributes to racial inequities that limit and/or prevent equal access and opportunities,, center the lived experiences of BIPOC that provides a wide range of narratives that illustrate resistance, resiliency, joy, and oppression,, promote a classroom environment of equitable practices to ensure the academic success of all students,, embed skill sets and course goals that provide students with the tools to become antiracist citizens in a democratic society
ANTH 302 Medical Anthropology Melanie A. Medeiros   Part of this course examines racial disparities in health, including how racism impacts health, access to healthcare and the healthcare provider-patient interaction. The course also contemplates ways to address these issues. This course (1) "identifies the ways racism contributes to racial inequities that limit and/or prevent equal access and opportunities;" (2) "centers the lived experiences of BIPOC;" and (3) "promotes a classroom environment of equitable practices to ensure the academic success of all students."
ARTH 174 Visual Culture Today Alla Myzelev   As a course aimed to teach students about importance of visual culture in the contemporary society, Visual Culture today looks at the historical examples of the uses of race to empower and inform political struggle. We then look at the contemporary examples from the current BLM movement to understand how visual culture informs and inspires BIPOC activism today. acknowledge the role and impact of race and racism on the construction of knowledge in their discipline and beyond,, identify the ways racism contributes to racial inequities that limit and/or prevent equal access and opportunities,, center the lived experiences of BIPOC that provides a wide range of narratives that illustrate resistance, resiliency, joy, and oppression,, promote a classroom environment of equitable practices to ensure the academic success of all students,, embed skill sets and course goals that provide students with the tools to become antiracist citizens in a democratic society
CHEM 352 Senior Chemistry Seminar II Wendy Pogozelski   Most science classes do not easily incorporate content about racism (although I try to de-whiten the curriculum in my classes by including research from BIPOC researchers, showing a film about the discovery of DNA structure and the resultant sexism that went along with it, and by offering extra credit for students watching films or reading books from a list that includes BIPOC contributions to science). However, the Senior Seminar in Chemistry provides a unique opportunity to address racism more directly. The course is designed to give students real-world skills ranging from information about careers to interviewing skills to library research. In the first semester in the fall, students heard from several invited speakers in BIPOC categories, but for this second spring semester, I plan to address the topic head-on. I have chosen a case study on the experiences of African-American students and professionals in science. The case study is meant to raise awareness of racism, increase empathy and understanding, and provide bridges for the relationships that are so crucial in science. I vetted the case study with members of my department so that I could treat the issue with appropriate sensitivity. The class also invites special speakers and I will continue to invite speakers who are diverse in gender, race, ethnicity, etc. Since we are doing these talks by Zoom this year, I hope to also provide students of color or students who share an identity with the speaker with an opportunity to connect with the speaker in a small group to share career advice on a more personal level. I am also planning a panel of speakers for the class on the topic of racism in science and strategies for combating racism. Although the panel and these talks will be conducted for the Senior Seminar class, all of our majors will be invited, and so we hope that the impact will be wide-ranging. I don't want to overstate anything. I should point out that the case study and the panel will only amount to two class periods of this one-credit course, as the majority of the course will be devoted to student presentations and guest presentations. identify the ways racism contributes to racial inequities that limit and/or prevent equal access and opportunities,, center the lived experiences of BIPOC that provides a wide range of narratives that illustrate resistance, resiliency, joy, and oppression,, promote a classroom environment of equitable practices to ensure the academic success of all students,, embed skill sets and course goals that provide students with the tools to become antiracist citizens in a democratic society
CMRD101 Common Read: March Sherry Larson-Rhodes   Many students arrive in college knowing little more about the history of the civil rights movement other than "The North won the Civil War & freed the slaves, Reconstruction fixed a bunch of stuff, & what Reconstruction didn't fix the civil rights movement did." Consequently, they're unaware of the deep-seated structural & systematic racism built into American society. By learning more about the struggles of those who fought for civil rights, students will gain an increased knowledge of the achievements of the civil rights movement, as well as knowledge of just how far we still have to go to eradicate racism. identify the ways racism contributes to racial inequities that limit and/or prevent equal access and opportunities,, center the lived experiences of BIPOC that provides a wide range of narratives that illustrate resistance, resiliency, joy, and oppression,, promote a classroom environment of equitable practices to ensure the academic success of all students,, embed skill sets and course goals that provide students with the tools to become antiracist citizens in a democratic society
COMN 346 Conflict, Negotiation, & Mediation Karen Dickerson   As a course focused on communicating in conflict situations, we already address issues of racism and current events during a semester. Each semester, we adapt to address current conflicts, many of them will involve systemic issues we have as a country. We discuss issues of inequity, historical racism, imbalance of power, interpersonal violence, and the choices to mediate or resolve conflict. If designated as an anti-racist course, we would even more intentionally include a focus on eliminating racism through communication and conflict resolution. acknowledge the role and impact of race and racism on the construction of knowledge in their discipline and beyond,, identify the ways racism contributes to racial inequities that limit and/or prevent equal access and opportunities,, center the lived experiences of BIPOC that provides a wide range of narratives that illustrate resistance, resiliency, joy, and oppression,, promote a classroom environment of equitable practices to ensure the academic success of all students,, embed skill sets and course goals that provide students with the tools to become antiracist citizens in a democratic society
CURR 620 Adolescent Literacy Intersession 2021 Sharon Peck   This course includes a module on antiracist pedagogy at the adolescent level. This course includes a deep dive into ways to incorporate antiracist pedagogy into adolescent instruction. Students will explore equitable classroom practices, ways to support adolescents to become antiracist citizens in a democratic society.
DANC 100 Introduction to Dance Nicolette Ferguson   Centers the dance styles and techniques of BIPOC choreographers and dancers whose work and contributions are often ignored, diminished or excluded from the landscape of dance as an art form. acknowledge the role and impact of race and racism on the construction of knowledge in their discipline and beyond,, center the lived experiences of BIPOC that provides a wide range of narratives that illustrate resistance, resiliency, joy, and oppression,, promote a classroom environment of equitable practices to ensure the academic success of all students,, embed skill sets and course goals that provide students with the tools to become antiracist citizens in a democratic society
DANC 204 Cultural Dance II - Jamaican Dance Nicolette Ferguson CRN 60015 Danc 204.01/02 Cultural Dance II: Jamaican Dance Centers the attributes, aesthetics and contributions of Africans, via the Caribbean, in the field of Dance. center the lived experiences of BIPOC that provides a wide range of narratives that illustrate resistance, resiliency, joy, and oppression,, promote a classroom environment of equitable practices to ensure the academic success of all students,, embed skill sets and course goals that provide students with the tools to become antiracist citizens in a democratic society
ENGL 301: Advance Poetry Workshop Lytton Smith Future Poetics (CRN 52274) It addresses and intervenes in both John Keene's question "Why is there not an archive of local or global Black digital literature or cyber literature?" and Mendi Obadike point that "we did not feel that the net was a colorless space, but rather, that whiteness was being set up as the default." This course will help us identify moments where our own and others' constructions of "racial imaginaries" limit and make impossible our human interaction with one another on and off the poetic page. By helping us encounter poems, programming code, websites, archives and other spaces where such racial imaginaries operate, and by tracing creative ways beyond such constructions, we will work to develop skill sets for anti-racist creative writing, reading, and community formation.
ENVR 124: Environmental Issues Jessica Gilbert   This course incorporates discussions on the intersections between socio-environmental systems, environmental justice, and racial justice, and the impacts of "traditional" environmental issues on racial and other forms of injustice. Students apply knowledge gained through writing projects that support local social and environmental justice community partners. acknowledge the role and impact of race and racism on the construction of knowledge in their discipline and beyond,, identify the ways racism contributes to racial inequities that limit and/or prevent equal access and opportunities,, center the lived experiences of BIPOC that provides a wide range of narratives that illustrate resistance, resiliency, joy, and oppression,, promote a classroom environment of equitable practices to ensure the academic success of all students,, embed skill sets and course goals that provide students with the tools to become antiracist citizens in a democratic society
GEOG 102: 01 and 02, Human Geography David Robertson   In exploring and critiquing traditional and modern concepts of race and ethnicity, exploring ethnic geographies of the world and of the USA, and associated conquests and migrations of BIPOC groups, I believe that this course makes important ant-racist contributions. acknowledge the role and impact of race and racism on the construction of knowledge in their discipline and beyond,, center the lived experiences of BIPOC that provides a wide range of narratives that illustrate resistance, resiliency, joy, and oppression,, promote a classroom environment of equitable practices to ensure the academic success of all students,
GEOG 377: Urban Geography Jennifer Rogalsky   In this course we will study historic urban policies that have contributed to many legacies of segregation and discrimination in cities today. After discussing issues/concepts/policies such as racism, redlining, restrictive covenants, white flight, race riots, Jim Crow laws, spatial and skills mismatch funded by subsidies that encouraged suburbanization, etc. – we then look to the future of cities and how to affect urban policy and practices, and people’s attitudes, in order to make cities more equitable places. acknowledge the role and impact of race and racism on the construction of knowledge in their discipline and beyond,, identify the ways racism contributes to racial inequities that limit and/or prevent equal access and opportunities,, center the lived experiences of BIPOC that provides a wide range of narratives that illustrate resistance, resiliency, joy, and oppression,, promote a classroom environment of equitable practices to ensure the academic success of all students,, embed skill sets and course goals that provide students with the tools to become antiracist citizens in a democratic society
HIST 262 Michael Oberg Indigenous Law and Public Policy Indigenous Law and Public Policy explores in detail the origins of Settler Colonialism and attempts in the English-speaking world to counter it. acknowledge the role and impact of race and racism on the construction of knowledge in their discipline and beyond,, identify the ways racism contributes to racial inequities that limit and/or prevent equal access and opportunities,, center the lived experiences of BIPOC that provides a wide range of narratives that illustrate resistance, resiliency, joy, and oppression,, embed skill sets and course goals that provide students with the tools to become antiracist citizens in a democratic society
HIST 275 Global History of Sexual Science Ryan M. Jones   Race has always been involved with how categories of sexuality and gender were constructed--and was a main component in how colonial powers, which promoted sexual science, regarded "others." This class engages students with how many of their understandings of objective "science" and "medicine" are actually related to these biases from the past, with baked in biases today, and we work through how to understand our categories outside the positivist frameworks produced through racist imperialism. My class is also global in nature and centers the non-West and Global South vs. Eurocentrism and the US. acknowledge the role and impact of race and racism on the construction of knowledge in their discipline and beyond,, identify the ways racism contributes to racial inequities that limit and/or prevent equal access and opportunities,, center the lived experiences of BIPOC that provides a wide range of narratives that illustrate resistance, resiliency, joy, and oppression,, promote a classroom environment of equitable practices to ensure the academic success of all students,
HIST 282 M/Hist of East Asia Since 1840 Ling Ma   I believe that to eliminate and prevent racism, we must first understand the production of racism and differences and the impact of human agency in this process. Therefore, almost all my courses pay special attention to how and why differences and stereotypes were narrated, rationalized, and applied in the past and in different societies, and how and why stereotypes and discriminations could be abandoned, perpetuated, or revived. HIST282, for example, focuses on the modern era when East Asian societies became deeply intertwined with each other and with the rest of the world. It examines the power dynamics and racial discourses that accompanied and shaped this increased contact. We discuss, for example, the sense of racialized cultural superiority embedded in both American imperialistic civilizing missions to Japan and Japanese ultra-nationalist writings that called for the expulsion of foreigners. We also delve into the racial dimensions of the World War II, exploring how both the actual racial inequalities in the world system and racist discourses criticizing such inequalities led to destructive wars and violence against the racial "others." acknowledge the role and impact of race and racism on the construction of knowledge in their discipline and beyond,, identify the ways racism contributes to racial inequities that limit and/or prevent equal access and opportunities,, center the lived experiences of BIPOC that provides a wide range of narratives that illustrate resistance, resiliency, joy, and oppression,, promote a classroom environment of equitable practices to ensure the academic success of all students,, embed skill sets and course goals that provide students with the tools to become antiracist citizens in a democratic society
HIST 284 History of China before 1800 Ling Ma   I believe that to eliminate and prevent racism, we must first understand the production of racism and differences and the impact of human agency in this process. Therefore, almost all my courses pay special attention to how and why differences and stereotypes were narrated, rationalized, and applied in the past and in different societies, and how and why stereotypes and discriminations could be abandoned, perpetuated, or revived. HIST284, for example, devotes considerable attention to how ancient Chinese in an era before scientific racism approached differences through notions of cultural hierarchy, acculturation, and intermarriage. We emphasize that these approaches were often ethnocentric but they also allowed a higher degree of social mobility and fluidity across cultural boundaries than the later racial frameworks did. acknowledge the role and impact of race and racism on the construction of knowledge in their discipline and beyond,, identify the ways racism contributes to racial inequities that limit and/or prevent equal access and opportunities,, center the lived experiences of BIPOC that provides a wide range of narratives that illustrate resistance, resiliency, joy, and oppression,, promote a classroom environment of equitable practices to ensure the academic success of all students,, embed skill sets and course goals that provide students with the tools to become antiracist citizens in a democratic society
HIST 284 S/MSt in LACAANA Hist:S.Asia Peter Samuels 60051 This course pays particular attention to racism, colonialism, and casteism, all of which were, or are, ideologies and structures of inequality and discrimination in South Asia and globally. The course also directs attention to the efforts of people from all backgrounds to overcome these ideologies and structures of inequality, within the region and globally. acknowledge the role and impact of race and racism on the construction of knowledge in their discipline and beyond,, identify the ways racism contributes to racial inequities that limit and/or prevent equal access and opportunities,, center the lived experiences of BIPOC that provides a wide range of narratives that illustrate resistance, resiliency, joy, and oppression,, promote a classroom environment of equitable practices to ensure the academic success of all students,, embed skill sets and course goals that provide students with the tools to become antiracist citizens in a democratic society
HIST 301 Interpretations in History: Shanghai Ling Ma Shanghai This course pays particular attention to the growth of an Asian port city in the age of capitalism, imperialism, nationalism, and internationalism. It tackles the complex issues of racial confrontation, cross-racial collaboration, and the intersectionality of race, nation, and gender. It delves into, for example, how racial discourses were mobilized to justify the economic and political dominance of both Euro-American residents and elite Chinese from Jiangnan and how such discourses both perpetuated spatial, social, and occupational segregation and stimulated resistance and protests. acknowledge the role and impact of race and racism on the construction of knowledge in their discipline and beyond,, identify the ways racism contributes to racial inequities that limit and/or prevent equal access and opportunities,, center the lived experiences of BIPOC that provides a wide range of narratives that illustrate resistance, resiliency, joy, and oppression,, promote a classroom environment of equitable practices to ensure the academic success of all students,, embed skill sets and course goals that provide students with the tools to become antiracist citizens in a democratic society
HIST 301-02 Intrp-Hist:Reconstruction Justin Behrend Reconstruction:
This course introduces students to the concept of historiography, which includes the critical assessment of the methods and sources that historians use in fashioning an argument, the contexts that inform historians' approaches to understanding the past, and comparisons of different historians' conclusions about similar topics. Our goal is to learn about historians and how they have interpreted the Reconstruction period, not just the facts of Reconstruction. We will do this by understanding historians' arguments and theories, and how these interpretations changed over time from the early 20th century through to the present.
Students will evaluate white supremacist interpretations of history and compare with antiracist interpretations, particularly from Black scholars. Moreover, the historical content of the Reconstruction era addresses the history of and struggle against racial inequalities. acknowledge the role and impact of race and racism on the construction of knowledge in their discipline and beyond,, identify the ways racism contributes to racial inequities that limit and/or prevent equal access and opportunities,, center the lived experiences of BIPOC that provides a wide range of narratives that illustrate resistance, resiliency, joy, and oppression,, promote a classroom environment of equitable practices to ensure the academic success of all students,, embed skill sets and course goals that provide students with the tools to become antiracist citizens in a democratic society
HIST 302 Kathleen Mapes Rural American in the Twentieth Century This course is a methods course. In addition to exploring how and why students tend to associate farming with whiteness, we explore the experiences of black farmers and laborers, immigrant farmers and laborers, as well as agricultural policies that have excluded non-white groups from equal opportunity. acknowledge the role and impact of race and racism on the construction of knowledge in their discipline and beyond,, identify the ways racism contributes to racial inequities that limit and/or prevent equal access and opportunities,, center the lived experiences of BIPOC that provides a wide range of narratives that illustrate resistance, resiliency, joy, and oppression,, promote a classroom environment of equitable practices to ensure the academic success of all students,, embed skill sets and course goals that provide students with the tools to become antiracist citizens in a democratic society
HIST 411 Kathleen Mapes   My course highlights US history from 1918-1945. Among many topics, we explore the rise of the KKK, anti-immigration legislation, the movement of Jim Crow to the North, and the various ways that the New Deal furthered institutionalized racism via red lining and other policies. acknowledge the role and impact of race and racism on the construction of knowledge in their discipline and beyond,, identify the ways racism contributes to racial inequities that limit and/or prevent equal access and opportunities,, center the lived experiences of BIPOC that provides a wide range of narratives that illustrate resistance, resiliency, joy, and oppression,, promote a classroom environment of equitable practices to ensure the academic success of all students,, embed skill sets and course goals that provide students with the tools to become antiracist citizens in a democratic society
Hist 430-01 AdvStAm Hist: Catherine Adams Intersectionality in Early America America has always been a diverse nation. Since the beginning the lived experiences of Americans has been shaped by systems of power that impinged differently upon the lives of individuals and groups particular to their race, class, gender, and sexual identity. In this course we will explore the history of our diverse past in an effort to understand the ways that systems of power based on race and other factors set the stage for the circumstances we face today. acknowledge the role and impact of race and racism on the construction of knowledge in their discipline and beyond,, identify the ways racism contributes to racial inequities that limit and/or prevent equal access and opportunities,, center the lived experiences of BIPOC that provides a wide range of narratives that illustrate resistance, resiliency, joy, and oppression,, promote a classroom environment of equitable practices to ensure the academic success of all students,, embed skill sets and course goals that provide students with the tools to become antiracist citizens in a democratic society
HIST 480: LACAANA:Gandhi and Nonviolence Peter Samuels 60060 This course pays particular attention to racism and colonialism which were, and are, ideologies and structures of inequality and discrimination globally. The course also directs attention to the efforts of people from all backgrounds to overcome these ideologies and structures of inequality, with a particular focus on the lives of Mahatma Gandhi and Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and the movements for justice that they led in India and the United States by espousing the philosophy and practice of nonviolence. acknowledge the role and impact of race and racism on the construction of knowledge in their discipline and beyond,, identify the ways racism contributes to racial inequities that limit and/or prevent equal access and opportunities,, center the lived experiences of BIPOC that provides a wide range of narratives that illustrate resistance, resiliency, joy, and oppression,, promote a classroom environment of equitable practices to ensure the academic success of all students,, embed skill sets and course goals that provide students with the tools to become antiracist citizens in a democratic society
HUMN 222 - Black Humanities Maria Helena Lima the 1619 Project The course takes on the New York Times challenge to reframe American History, placing slavery as foundational to everything the country has become. All of the above. I created Black Humanities at the College precisely to tell a different story about who we are as a people.
INTD 105 Blackness & Media Kiara Massar   In my course, students will first have to recognize how race is an ideological construct. Once they can recognize and acknowledge this construct, then we can move forward with how to make the change to an anti-racist society. Teaching students the importance of moving away from racial stereotypes and ideologies that the media portrays will help make them aware and, hopefully, lend a hand in creating an anti-racist campus environment. acknowledge the role and impact of race and racism on the construction of knowledge in their discipline and beyond,, identify the ways racism contributes to racial inequities that limit and/or prevent equal access and opportunities,, center the lived experiences of BIPOC that provides a wide range of narratives that illustrate resistance, resiliency, joy, and oppression,, promote a classroom environment of equitable practices to ensure the academic success of all students,, embed skill sets and course goals that provide students with the tools to become antiracist citizens in a democratic society
INTD 105 Modern Age in America Lisa D'Angelo   Within my course students read essays from a collection of authors who speak to their personal experiences pertaining to racism, discrimination and oppression within American society. Students then write an essay in response to these readings, incorporating quotes that identify the experience and then responding to what these authors are saying through the I Say method, which encourages and provides an opportunity for them to react and connect to the topic of racism. identify the ways racism contributes to racial inequities that limit and/or prevent equal access and opportunities,, center the lived experiences of BIPOC that provides a wide range of narratives that illustrate resistance, resiliency, joy, and oppression,, promote a classroom environment of equitable practices to ensure the academic success of all students,, embed skill sets and course goals that provide students with the tools to become antiracist citizens in a democratic society
INTD 105 Writing Seminar: Freedom of Speech & Art Jonathan Auyer   This course will broaden the traditional set of texts and learning materials on freedom of speech and the arts (which are often written by white, male authors) to include the voices, experiences, writings, and perspectives of BIPOC individuals. identify the ways racism contributes to racial inequities that limit and/or prevent equal access and opportunities,, center the lived experiences of BIPOC that provides a wide range of narratives that illustrate resistance, resiliency, joy, and oppression,
INTD 251 Tara Pepis   This course will work with students to identify the ways in which individual implicit biases can be recognized and changed through recognition of biases and the implementation of strategies to recognize and reduce bias. acknowledge the role and impact of race and racism on the construction of knowledge in their discipline and beyond,, identify the ways racism contributes to racial inequities that limit and/or prevent equal access and opportunities,, promote a classroom environment of equitable practices to ensure the academic success of all students,, embed skill sets and course goals that provide students with the tools to become antiracist citizens in a democratic society
Math 239 03, Introduction to Mathematical Proof Doug Baldwin   Traditional grading practice measures a combination of content mastery and "good" behavior (e.g., class attendance, timely completion of work, completion of extra credit opportunities, etc.) Assuming that these behaviors are possible at all implicitly favors students from privileged backgrounds, typically upper- or middle-class white students, and disadvantages everyone else. This course will be using a mastery-only approach to grading in an attempt to level this part of the playing field. promote a classroom environment of equitable practices to ensure the academic success of all students,
Math 240 01, Object Oriented Programming and Mathematical Structures Doug Baldwin   Traditional grading practice measures a combination of content mastery and "good" behavior (e.g., class attendance, timely completion of work, completion of extra credit opportunities, etc.) Assuming that these behaviors are possible at all implicitly favors students from privileged backgrounds, typically upper- or middle-class white students, and disadvantages everyone else. This course will be using a mastery-only approach to grading in an attempt to level this part of the playing field. promote a classroom environment of equitable practices to ensure the academic success of all students,
MGMT 300 section 3 Organizational Behavior Karen Sims   Exploring the role of organizations and team members in identifying and building inclusive workplaces. Applications and examples of organizational behavior theories, concepts, and practices to determine how to sustain diversity and inclusion efforts to move equality from a talking point to a reality, starting with the workplace. acknowledge the role and impact of race and racism on the construction of knowledge in their discipline and beyond,, identify the ways racism contributes to racial inequities that limit and/or prevent equal access and opportunities,, center the lived experiences of BIPOC that provides a wide range of narratives that illustrate resistance, resiliency, joy, and oppression,, promote a classroom environment of equitable practices to ensure the academic success of all students,, embed skill sets and course goals that provide students with the tools to become antiracist citizens in a democratic society
MGMT 388 Anti-Discrimination Law and Its Impact on Business and Society James Quinn   "Knowledge is Power" is a well known expression for good reason. This course will provide valuable knowledge about the evolving protections offered by our anti-discrimination laws to students who are - or want to be - actively involved in fighting racism, sexism, and LGBTQ+-based discrimination. Students will be better able to advance social justice goals if they know their legal rights and how to enforce them through lawsuits and administrative proceedings. acknowledge the role and impact of race and racism on the construction of knowledge in their discipline and beyond,, identify the ways racism contributes to racial inequities that limit and/or prevent equal access and opportunities,, promote a classroom environment of equitable practices to ensure the academic success of all students,, embed skill sets and course goals that provide students with the tools to become antiracist citizens in a democratic society
MUSC 160-01 Gerard Floriano Chamber Singers The repertoire selections of the SUNY Geneseo choral ensembles consistently incorporate works by BIPOC and women composers, as well as other traditionally under-represented composer groups in order to empower and enrich our students through the knowledge and understanding of a more diverse canon of works. We discuss the issues of systemic racism through the lens of choral music focusing on text, context, origins, and styles of the music we sing. acknowledge the role and impact of race and racism on the construction of knowledge in their discipline and beyond,, identify the ways racism contributes to racial inequities that limit and/or prevent equal access and opportunities,, center the lived experiences of BIPOC that provides a wide range of narratives that illustrate resistance, resiliency, joy, and oppression,, promote a classroom environment of equitable practices to ensure the academic success of all students,, embed skill sets and course goals that provide students with the tools to become antiracist citizens in a democratic society
MUSC 160-03 Gerard Floriano Festival Singers The repertoire selections of the SUNY Geneseo choral ensembles consistently incorporate works by BIPOC and women composers, as well as other traditionally under-represented composer groups in order to empower and enrich our students through the knowledge and understanding of a more diverse canon of works. We discuss the issues of systemic racism through the lens of choral music focusing on text, context, origins, and styles of the music we sing. acknowledge the role and impact of race and racism on the construction of knowledge in their discipline and beyond,, identify the ways racism contributes to racial inequities that limit and/or prevent equal access and opportunities,, center the lived experiences of BIPOC that provides a wide range of narratives that illustrate resistance, resiliency, joy, and oppression,, promote a classroom environment of equitable practices to ensure the academic success of all students,, embed skill sets and course goals that provide students with the tools to become antiracist citizens in a democratic society
MUSC 165-04 Jazz Ensemble Bill Tiberio   Jazz is a uniquely American artform that was introduced to the country and developed almost entirely by Black musicians. Virtually everything we perform has its roots in Black music, and we directly work each week on music composed originally by Black writers. We are committed to identifying and celebrating this music. acknowledge the role and impact of race and racism on the construction of knowledge in their discipline and beyond,, identify the ways racism contributes to racial inequities that limit and/or prevent equal access and opportunities,, center the lived experiences of BIPOC that provides a wide range of narratives that illustrate resistance, resiliency, joy, and oppression,, promote a classroom environment of equitable practices to ensure the academic success of all students,, embed skill sets and course goals that provide students with the tools to become antiracist citizens in a democratic society
PHIL 288 EXP Punishment, Race, and the Carceral State Amanda Roth   The aim of this course is to examine and evaluate the (in)justice of mass incarceration and policing in the U.S., with an emphasis on understanding how systems of criminal punishment and policing act as a form of racial social control as well as the motivations of the Black Lives Matter protest movement. Work by philosophers of color will be prioritized wherever possible and we will move beyond abstract philosophical ideas to consider real world attempts at change through the discipline of philosophy, as in the case of philosophical contributions to prison teaching programs. acknowledge the role and impact of race and racism on the construction of knowledge in their discipline and beyond,, identify the ways racism contributes to racial inequities that limit and/or prevent equal access and opportunities,, center the lived experiences of BIPOC that provides a wide range of narratives that illustrate resistance, resiliency, joy, and oppression,, promote a classroom environment of equitable practices to ensure the academic success of all students,, embed skill sets and course goals that provide students with the tools to become antiracist citizens in a democratic society
PLSC 361 Women & Politics Hanna Brant   My course meets this definition of anti-racism in both the classroom environment I will foster and the course content assigned in the class. I will challenge students to understand how racism, and the intersection of racism and sexism, undermines women's political voice, opportunity, and involvement in the United States. In addition, although the course is titled "Women & Politics," the course will be trans, gender non-conforming, and non-binary inclusive in both the course content and classroom environment. A theme interwoven throughout the course will address how the founding of the US and the US Constitution are rooted in racism that has consequences for BIPOC women's political access and opportunity in present-day. The assigned readings will center the voices of BIPOC and trans* authors.
PLSC 490 - Senior Seminar Karleen West Global Environmental Politics This course is focused on the interconnection between economic equality, social justice, and the environment globally, and the political inflection points that can lead to positive change in these systems. acknowledge the role and impact of race and racism on the construction of knowledge in their discipline and beyond,, identify the ways racism contributes to racial inequities that limit and/or prevent equal access and opportunities,, center the lived experiences of BIPOC that provides a wide range of narratives that illustrate resistance, resiliency, joy, and oppression,, promote a classroom environment of equitable practices to ensure the academic success of all students,, embed skill sets and course goals that provide students with the tools to become antiracist citizens in a democratic society
PSYC 288 Exp: Psych & Social Justice Monica Schneider   This course is an introduction to the psychological theory and research associated with social justice issues, focusing on both individual and systemic factors. Topics like stereotyping and prejudice, implicit bias, social identity theory, stereotype threat, system justification, victim blaming, threat and intergroup dynamics, and power and privilege will be addressed as they relate to social justice issues across group memberships (e.g., race, gender) and systems (e.g., criminal justice system, healthcare). acknowledge the role and impact of race and racism on the construction of knowledge in their discipline and beyond,, identify the ways racism contributes to racial inequities that limit and/or prevent equal access and opportunities,, promote a classroom environment of equitable practices to ensure the academic success of all students,, embed skill sets and course goals that provide students with the tools to become antiracist citizens in a democratic society
PSYC 388 exp: intro to forensic psych jenny katz psyc 388 exp: intro to forensic psychology CRN 59989 This course provides an overview of major topics related to forensic psychology, including different ways of understanding people who break the law as “sick” or “mad” versus “evil” or “bad,” an overview psychological influences on police and investigations, the development of criminal behavior and its persistence, and the role of the psychologist in the legal system. A secondary focus of this course is to examine representations of criminality and how common conceptions of race and gender influence perceptions of behaviors and people as criminal. from the course description: A secondary focus of this course is to examine representations of criminality and how common conceptions of race and gender influence perceptions of behaviors and people as criminal. We will read and explore multiple texts focused on race, implicit bias, and the criminalization of people of color, including Eberhardt, J. L. (2019). Biased: Uncovering the hidden prejudice that shapes what we see, think and do. Viking, an imprint of Penguin Random House. ISBN-13: 978-0735224957 and Benforado, A. (2016). Unfair: The new science of criminal injustice. Penguin Random House. ISBN13 978-0-7704-3778-7 acknowledge the role and impact of race and racism on the construction of knowledge in their discipline and beyond,, identify the ways racism contributes to racial inequities that limit and/or prevent equal access and opportunities,, promote a classroom environment of equitable practices to ensure the academic success of all students,, embed skill sets and course goals that provide students with the tools to become antiracist citizens in a democratic society
PSYC 452 adv research in psych: bias bigotry and blindspots jenny katz CRN 57921 This writing intensive class will explore different ways that racism and other forms of bias manifest, the consequences of bias, and empirically based approaches to addressing bias and its consequences. Some of the specific topics to be explored include social identity theory, implicit bias, and intersectionality (e.g., how people from different racial/ethnic groups are perceived also depends on other factors such as gender, social class, nationality, sexual orientation, and so on). acknowledge the role and impact of race and racism on the construction of knowledge in their discipline and beyond,, identify the ways racism contributes to racial inequities that limit and/or prevent equal access and opportunities,, promote a classroom environment of equitable practices to ensure the academic success of all students,, embed skill sets and course goals that provide students with the tools to become antiracist citizens in a democratic society
PSYC 452: Advanced Research Methods Christine Merrilees Peace Psychology Peace psychology is defined as applying psychological knowledge in the
pursuit of both the absence of destructive conflict, direct and structural and the creation of positive and equitable social conditions which minimize destructiveness and promote human well-being. In this course we examine applications of peace psychology in global armed conflicts and in intergroup conflicts in the United States.
Through content themes such as mass incarceration and police reform, we examine structural systems of racism that enact violence and prevent equal access to resources that promote human well-being. Student also identify how race has been used in multiple international settings as a means of maintaining power and oppression over different groups throughout history.
SOCL 100 Michael Restivo   Intro to Sociology provides students with critical perspectives on race and racism in contemporary America by tracing the history and practices of systemic/institutional racism from the founding of the country through the present. Specific consideration given to the social construction of racial categories, structural inequalities, and the "double consciousness" experienced by African-Americans and members of other minoritized groups because of their racialized oppression in a white-dominated society. acknowledge the role and impact of race and racism on the construction of knowledge in their discipline and beyond,, identify the ways racism contributes to racial inequities that limit and/or prevent equal access and opportunities,, promote a classroom environment of equitable practices to ensure the academic success of all students,
SOCL 100 Introduction to Sociology Denise Scott   In SOCL100, racism and racialized structures and systems, how they work in society, and their consequences, are a central theme in the course. In addition to articles, I assign, as required reading, the book THE NEW JIM CROW by Michele Alexander, which focuses on how the criminal justice system (and other societal systems and structures) functions essentially as a modern form of racial separation and control. acknowledge the role and impact of race and racism on the construction of knowledge in their discipline and beyond,, identify the ways racism contributes to racial inequities that limit and/or prevent equal access and opportunities,, center the lived experiences of BIPOC that provides a wide range of narratives that illustrate resistance, resiliency, joy, and oppression,, promote a classroom environment of equitable practices to ensure the academic success of all students,, embed skill sets and course goals that provide students with the tools to become antiracist citizens in a democratic society
SOCL 100- Introduction to Sociology Amy Ivers   SOCL 100 has a unit entitled "Race and Ethnicity", where we explore the roots of institutional and individual racism in the US. The course also uses experts in the study of anti-racism in readings and projects, including the book "How to Be An Antiracist" by Kendi, along with other readings by Michelle Alexander and Ta Ne'hisi Coates. acknowledge the role and impact of race and racism on the construction of knowledge in their discipline and beyond,, identify the ways racism contributes to racial inequities that limit and/or prevent equal access and opportunities,, center the lived experiences of BIPOC that provides a wide range of narratives that illustrate resistance, resiliency, joy, and oppression,, promote a classroom environment of equitable practices to ensure the academic success of all students,, embed skill sets and course goals that provide students with the tools to become antiracist citizens in a democratic society
SOCL 102 Introduction to Social Problems and Public Policy Kurt Cylke   Intro to Social Problems and Public Policy thematically introduces students to the workings of the American economy and national policy apparatus with a focus on the systemic generation of extreme economic and political inequality and the disproportionate impact extreme inequality has on minority populations. acknowledge the role and impact of race and racism on the construction of knowledge in their discipline and beyond,, identify the ways racism contributes to racial inequities that limit and/or prevent equal access and opportunities,, promote a classroom environment of equitable practices to ensure the academic success of all students,
SOCL 210 Sociology of Families Denise Scott   In SOCL210, racism and racialized systems and structures are central to understanding how the "family" is socially-historically constructed as well as the diversity of family forms, relations between people in families, and relations between families and institutions in the U.S. In addition to articles for the course (many of which are included in the reader "Families As They Really Are," which focuses on racial, gender, and sexual diversity and inequality), I assign the book MOTHERING WHILE BLACK, by Dawn Marie Dow," which focuses on how racism and racialized structures and systems are experienced by black middle-class families and how they grapple with decisions around how to ensure the safety, well-being, and future prospects of their children.  
SOCL 213 - Sociology of Medicine Amy Braksmajer   The course addresses the social determinants of health, including social inequality and structural inequities, in a way that emphasizes the role of social location (e.g., race, class, gender) in determining health outcomes. In discussing race, the course focuses on the social construction of racial categories, as well as how racism helps to shape inequities in health. acknowledge the role and impact of race and racism on the construction of knowledge in their discipline and beyond,, identify the ways racism contributes to racial inequities that limit and/or prevent equal access and opportunities,, center the lived experiences of BIPOC that provides a wide range of narratives that illustrate resistance, resiliency, joy, and oppression,, promote a classroom environment of equitable practices to ensure the academic success of all students,, embed skill sets and course goals that provide students with the tools to become antiracist citizens in a democratic society
SOCL 245 Sociology of Sports Bill Lofquist   This course explores and challenges the ways in which white supremacist ideology and structural racism work to reproduce, legitimize, and even naturalize racial differences in sporting opportunities and outcomes.  
SOCL 250 Sociology of Deviance Bill Lofquist   This course focuses on the ways in which historical and contemporary social constructions of deviance serve as a type of power wielded to define and control socially marginal populations. The social construction of Blackness as dangerous and deviant and the ways in which race shapes and intensifies experiences of marginalization are areas of emphasis. acknowledge the role and impact of race and racism on the construction of knowledge in their discipline and beyond,, identify the ways racism contributes to racial inequities that limit and/or prevent equal access and opportunities,, center the lived experiences of BIPOC that provides a wide range of narratives that illustrate resistance, resiliency, joy, and oppression,, promote a classroom environment of equitable practices to ensure the academic success of all students,, embed skill sets and course goals that provide students with the tools to become antiracist citizens in a democratic society
SOCL 340 Social Movements Paul McLaughlin   We read a number of articles on the civil rights movement and an entire book on the history of the abolitionist movement in Great Britain acknowledge the role and impact of race and racism on the construction of knowledge in their discipline and beyond,, identify the ways racism contributes to racial inequities that limit and/or prevent equal access and opportunities,, center the lived experiences of BIPOC that provides a wide range of narratives that illustrate resistance, resiliency, joy, and oppression,, promote a classroom environment of equitable practices to ensure the academic success of all students,, embed skill sets and course goals that provide students with the tools to become antiracist citizens in a democratic society
SOCL 347, Criminology & Juvenile Delinquency Bill Lofquist   This course explores the history of criminological theorizing, with attention to the ways in which those theories have often relied on white supremacist ideologies of racial difference and legitimized and naturalized racial inequalities. It also explores efforts to subvert these theories in favor of more constructionist and liberatory theories of crime. acknowledge the role and impact of race and racism on the construction of knowledge in their discipline and beyond,, identify the ways racism contributes to racial inequities that limit and/or prevent equal access and opportunities,, promote a classroom environment of equitable practices to ensure the academic success of all students,, embed skill sets and course goals that provide students with the tools to become antiracist citizens in a democratic society
WGST 320 Gender & Sexualities Amanda Roth

 

 

This course focuses on understanding gender and sexuality as personal identities, social constructions, and systems of structural inequality. It is committed to taking up an intersectional feminist perspective that recognizes the interlocking nature of sexism, racism, heteronormativity, cissexism, and ableism. Though race and racism is not the main focus of the course, an antiracist perspective and antiracist content is woven throughout the course content.  
WGST 490 Senior Capstone Seminar Amanda Roth   This course acts as a senior capstone for women's & gender studies majors, and will take up "carceral feminism"--especially approaches to ending gender and sexuality-based violence that have helped give rise to mass incarceration in the U.S. We will stress taking an intersectional feminist perspective that centers antiracism and stresses the ways in which systems of gender, sexuaity, class, and racial oppression interlock with one another and so must be fought together. (Of note, the course is restricted to senior WGST majors, minors, and concentrators.)