Breadcrumb

Ken Cooper

Associate Professor of English
Welles 219B
585-245-5267
cooper@geneseo.edu

Ken Cooper received his Ph.D. from Vanderbilt University and has been a member of the Geneseo faculty since 1993. His research is interested in the meeting point of 1970s culture and ecology. He frequently teaches the courses Filming the Seventies, Renewable Futures, Contemporary American Literature, and Bioregional Literature. He teaches a digital course through the Council of Public Liberal Arts Colleges called Storied Landscapes: 21st-Century Nature Writing. In collaboration with Geneseo Milne library archivist Liz Argentieri, Cooper and Argentieri have introduced the Open Valley course, a digital humanities project interested in ecology. In the course, students examine local history and culture through a bioregional lens, often pairing with local societies like nearby Genesee Country Village. The Open Valley course responds to growing student anxieties concerning the application of the English major, suggesting that writing skills can be useful in partnering with various organizations. He has also collaborated with Professors Garrity and Hannam for an interdepartmental course on Geographic Information System (GIS).


Cooper is currently a member of the Geneseo Sustainability Commission and was co-director of the Geneseo Food Project which inspired his courses on bioregional literature

Photo of Ken Cooper

Classes

  • ENGL 203: Reader & Text:Climate Fiction

    An introduction to the discipline of English through the study of particular topics, issues, genres, or authors. Subtitles of "Reader and Text" help students develop a working vocabulary for analyzing texts and relating texts to contexts; understand the theoretical questions that inform all critical conversations about textual meaning and value; and participate competently, as writers, in the ongoing conversation about texts and theory that constitutes English as a field of study.

  • ENGL 425: Enterprises:Open Valley

    A course organized around projects that draw upon critical and writing skills for applications beyond the college classroom: service learning, community partnerships, field-based research, web archives, etc. Students will be expected to work both independently and in collaboration with others. (May be taken twice for credit under different subtitles.) Prerequisites: ENGL 203. Not offered on a regular basis