English Department Course Offerings

CMLT 200 : Reading Transnationally:
This course provides the background to the practice of Comparative Literature and introduces students to arange of key theory-and-methods debates in the field, with attention to those surrounding such matters as history, globalization, culture, and the aesthetic. Typical subtitles include Sea Narratives, The Global Bildungsroman, Narratives of the Atlantic World, Screening ?Race,? Transnational Voices.   Credits: 4

CMLT 499 : Directed Study:
A comparative thesis of 30-35 pages that will be completed in consultation with two faculty members, one from each of two departments relevant to the thesis. The student will be expected to make an abbreviated presentation of the thesis in a GREAT Day or similar forum. Prerequisite: CMLT 200 and senior standing. Credits: 1-4 . Offered by individual arrangement   Credits: 1-4

ENGL 100 : College Writing
This course offers students who have completed INTD 105 the opportunity to develop proficiency in specific types of writing, sich as descriptive, expository, persuasive, and critical writing. Prerequisite: INTD 105.   Credits: 4

ENGL 101 : Topics in Literature:
Arthurian Romance is one of the most unusual literary forms in Western literature, cutting across genres, cultures, languages, and time. This course examines a number of these varying narratives and representations of Arthur through the ages and considers the figures of Guinevere, Lancelot, Merlin, and Tristan as well. Readings include Geoffrey of Monmouth, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, Sir Thomas Malory, Chretien de Troyes, and Marie de France from the Middle Ages, along with later works in English and American literature (for example, Spenser, Tennyson, and Twain) and in popular culture.   Credits: 4

ENGL 115 : Understanding Poetry
This course will enrich students? understanding of the craft of poetry?its design, its specialized techniques for creating and communicating meaning, and the specialized methodology necessary to constructing interpretations of it. This is not a course in writing poetry, but in the analysis of it. Students will read a wide variety of poems written in English from British, American, and other English-speaking traditions.   Credits: 4

ENGL 142 : Literary Forms:
An examination of the tradition and development of the literary form identified in the subtitle (e.g., epic, novel, romance, tragedy). (May be taken for credit twice under different subtitles.)   Credits: 3

ENGL 170 : The Practice of Criticism
Introduction to the interpretation and analysis of literature, as well as to the abstract principles and assumptions that underlie all efforts to represent the meaning, structure, and value of texts. In classroom discussions and short essay assignments, students undertake critical readings of texts from a variety of genres (poetry, novel, drama, etc.), while examining how critical controversy emerges from the different theoretical commitments and preconceptions of readers. This course is a prerequisite for any 300-level English literature course taken for the English major or concentration.   Credits: 3

ENGL 188 : Experimental:
  Credits: 0-4

ENGL 199 : Directed Study
  Credits: 1-4

ENGL 200 : College Writing II
This course is a writing workshop designed to give students many opportunities to practice their critical thinking and writing skills. Frequent writing required.   Credits: 3

ENGL 201 : Foundations ofCreative Writing
An intermediate-level writing workshop involving assignments in various literary forms. Class discussions will focus on student work as well as work by published authors.   Credits: 4

ENGL 202 : Reading As A Writer:
This course is a creative writing class designed to give students opportunities to pactice and refine their writing skills in one or two genres. Students may take twice for credit under different subtitles. Topics may include point-of-view and perspective in short fiction, creating characters, the persona poem. There is an emphasis on close reading, critical thinking and revision. Frequent writing required. (May be taken for credit twice under different subtitles.)   Credits: 4

ENGL 203 : Reader & Text:
This course provides an introduction to the discipline of English through the study of particular topics, issues, genres, or authors. Subtitles of ?Reader and Text? help students develop a working vocabulary for analyzing texts and relating texts to contexts; understand the theoretical questions that inform all critical conversations about textual meaning and value; and participate competently, as writers, in the ongoing conversation about texts and theory that constitutes English as a field of study. (May be taken for credit twice under different subtitles.)   Credits: 4

ENGL 205 : Business &Professional Writing
  Credits: 3

ENGL 210 : Elements of Screenwriting I
Elements of Screenwriting I is a study and practice of writing the feature film screenplay. The principle of character, environment, plot and event, dramatic force and arc, dialogue, music, and the physical format of the professional script will be covered. Prerequisites: ENGL 201 or permission of instructor.   Credits: 3

ENGL 212 : British Literature I
A study of selected works in British literature from its beginnings to 1700, with analyses of their artistic significance and descriptions of their place in the intellectual contexts of their ages.   Credits: 3

ENGL 213 : British Literature II
A study of selected works in British literature from 1700 to the present, with analyses of their artistic significance and descriptions of their place in the intellectual contexts of their ages.   Credits: 3

ENGL 215 : Understanding Poetry
This course will enrich students' understanding of the craft of poetry--its design, its specialized techniques for creating and communicating meaning, and the specialized methodology necessary to constructing interpretations of it. This is not a course in writing poetry, but in the analysis of it. We will read a wide variety of poems written in English from British, American, and other English-speaking traditions. Although this course will give some attention to the history of individual poetic forms, its primary goal will be to increase understanding of poetry's design and poets' methods.   Credits: 3

ENGL 218 : Cont Brit Lit-London:
A study of representative texts created and published in Britain, by British writers, largely for a cosmopolitan audience. The course explores how contemporary writers conceptualize their identity in relation to the nation. Offered every summer at Goldsmiths College, University of London   Credits: 3

ENGL 222 : Exploring the Renaissance:
A study of selected works to introduce students to major issues in Renaissance literature and to the techniques of literary methodology. Each section of the course will range over a variety of literary genres central to this period (lyric poetry, epic poetry, drama and prose fiction). May be taken twice for credit under different subtitles. Offered when demand is sufficient   Credits: 3

ENGL 232 : Top-Pre-1700 Brit Lit:
A study of selected works in British literature prior to 1700, seen within multiple contexts, such as themes, cultural issues, intellectual movements, nationhood, and genre. (May be taken for credit twice under different subtitles.) Offered fall, even years   Credits: 3

ENGL 233 : Top-Post-1700 Brit Lit:
A study of selected works in British literature after 1700, seen within multiple contexts, such as themes, cultural issues, intellectual movements, nationhood, and genre. (May be taken for credit twice under different subtitles.) Offered spring, even years   Credits: 3

ENGL 235 : American Literature
A study of selected major works in American literature from its beginnings to the present, with analyses of their artistic significance and descriptions of their place in the cultural context of their times. Emphasis is placed upon the continuities of the American tradition.   Credits: 3

ENGL 237 : Voices & Perspectives:
An exploration of diversity in literary and cinematic traditions. The texts will be studied in the context of such factors as class, ethnicity, gender, race, religion, sexual orientation and/or ability. (May be taken for credit twice.)   Credits: 3

ENGL 239 : American Visions:
A critical study of a theme, movement, or special subject matter of some consequence in the cultural tradition of the United States. Representative offerings are The Environmental Spirit, Slavery and the Civil War, and The Puritan Legacy. (May be taken for credit twice under different subtitles.) NOTE: Some sections of ENGL 239 featuring a significant concentration on film studies may be scheduled 3(2-2) to permit extended time for the viewing and discussion of films. Offered every fall   Credits: 0-3

ENGL 241 : World Literature:
The comparative study of significant literary works from Western and other cultural traditions. (May be taken for credit twice under different subtitles.) Offered every fall, odd years   Credits: 3

ENGL 242 : M/Lit of the African Diaspora
The term African diaspora has been used to refer to the grouping of diverse peoples and cultures that have, although dispersed throughout the world, retained a consciousness of shared origins and are identified as part of a cultural and social continuum with other communities of African origin, including those that remained on the African continent. This course will take up a diverse group of works from the African diaspora, inviting students to make connections and distinctions about themes, formal devices, political outlooks, etc., among African diasporic writers.   Credits: 3

ENGL 250 : Literature &
A variety of relationships between literature and other intellectual endeavors is studied in different sections of this course (e.g., Literature and Society, Literature and Science, Literature and History, Literature and Psychology). (May be taken for credit twice under different subtitles.) Offered fall, odd years   Credits: 3

ENGL 254 : Intro to Shakespeare
A critical introduction to Shakespeare's dramatic world through a study of from six to eight plays and some of the leading ideas which inform them.   Credits: 3

ENGL 267 : M/Non-Western Literature:
A study of various non-Western literatures in translation. Usually the literature of a single nation or area is selected (e.g., African, Asian, Chinese, Indian, Islamic, or Japanese). (May be taken for credit twice under different subtitles.) Offered every fall   Credits: 3

ENGL 280 : Yeats Summer School in Ireland
This study abroad course provides an introduction to the poetry and drama of Irish author W.B. Yeats. The course will be taught in a four-week summer session, beginning with an online introduction, followed by three weeks in Ireland, most of that time spent at the Yeats International Summer School in Sligo, Students will attend lectures and seminars by leading Yeats scholars from throughout the world, along with poetry readings and dramatic presentations. Permission of instructor.   Credits: 4

ENGL 282 : The Bible as Literature
A literary evaluation of the English Bible and a study of its influence in Western literature. Offered every spring   Credits: 3

ENGL 285 : F/Intro to Film Studies
An examination of world cinema, emphasizing the technological, formal, cultural and historical specificity of the moving image. Offered every fall   Credits: 0-3

ENGL 288 : Experimental:
  Credits: 0-4

ENGL 290 : London Theatre Seminar
This course provides an opportunity to experience abroad spectrum of the best in English theatre. The group will attend at least nine productions in small ?fringe? theatres; the state- supported theatres like the Royal Court, Royal Shakespeare Company, and Royal National Theatre; and the commercial West End. Several tours will be required, such as Shakespeare?s Globe, Royal National Theatre, Shakespeare Walking Tour, Drury Lane tour, and Covent Garden tour. Workshops will be scheduled to suit student interests, such as Acting Shakespeare at the Old Globe or design workshops through the Theatre Museum at the V&A. Students are expected to attend all of the above. There will be two orientation sessions prior to leaving for London. Students will be responsible for projects in London museums, written reviews of shows, and class discussions, held every 3-4 days. Note: course duration is two and a half weeks; may not be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: permission of instructor   Credits: 0-4

ENGL 299 : Directed Study
  Credits: 1-5

ENGL 301 : Advanced Poetry Workshop I
A practical course in the writing of poetry, using student assignments in the genre as a central means in discussions both in class sessions and individual conferences with the instructor. Prerequisites: ENGL 201 and permission of instructor   Credits: 4

ENGL 302 : Advanced Fiction Workshop I
A fiction writing workshop using student writings in the genre as well as published stories, both in class sessions and individual conferences with the instructor. Prerequisites: ENGL 201 and permission of the instructor. Offered every fall   Credits: 4

ENGL 303 : Advanced Poetry Workshop II
A practical course in the writing of poetry, using student assignments in the genre as a central means in discussions both in class sessions and individual conferences with the instructor. Students will further develop and continue to practice skills emphasized in Advanced Poetry Workshop I. Prerequisites: ENGL 201, ENGL 301, and permission of instructor.   Credits: 4

ENGL 304 : Adv Creative Fiction Wkshp II
A fiction writing workshop using student writings in the genre as well as published stories, both in class sessions and individual conferences with the instructor. Students will further develop and continue to practice skills emphasized in Advanced Fiction Workshop I. Prerequisites: ENGL 201, ENGL 302, and permission of instructor. Offered every fall   Credits: 4

ENGL 305 : AdvCreative Non-FictionWkshp I
A practical course in the writing of creative nonfiction. Student assignments in the genre are the focus of discussions, both in class sessions and individual conferences with the instructor. Prerequisites: ENGL 201 and permission of instructor.   Credits: 4

ENGL 306 : Writing for Teachers
This course offers writing instruction to advanced undergraduates who intend to teach. Students read writing theory, review English grammar, and write a series of essays over the course of the term. Prerequisites: 60 completed credit hours. Offered every spring   Credits: 3

ENGL 307 : AdvCreativeNon-FictionWkshp II
A practical course in the writing of creative nonfiction. Student assignments in the genre are the focus of discussions, both in class sessions and individual conferences with the instructor. Students will further develop and continue to practice skills emphasized in Advanced Creative Nonfiction Worksop I. Prerequisites: ENGL 201, ENGL 305, and permission of instructor.   Credits: 4

ENGL 310 : Connctn-Early Lit:Medieval Lit
Medieval Literature concentrates on literature from AD 500-1500, with Old English literature (in translation) and Middle English Literature (some in translation, most in original texts). The course presents specifically medieval genres, such as : epic poetry, sermons and chronicles); Middle English debate poetry, devotional poetry, romances (Arthurian and non-Arthurian), frame narratives, mystical writing, and the drama of the mystery and morality plays. These readings will closely consider aspects of Old English and Middle English grammar and also the intertextuality of medieval British literature in two senses: with non-literary and non-British works (the Bible, medieval European literature, historical documents and images, medieval commentaries) and in the reception of literature through modern scholarship. Prerequisite: ENGL 203.   Credits: 4

ENGL 311 : The British Renaissance
A critical study of the literature from More to Bacon (other than Shakespeare's plays) including such authors as Spenser and Sidney. Offered: fall, even years   Credits: 3

ENGL 312 : 17th Century British Lit
A study of dramatists, poets, and some prose writers from the period 1600-1660. Central issues include economy and desire, gender, nature and art, faith, Puritanism, and revolution. Authors include Donne, Jonson, Herbert, Marvell, Herrick. Offered spring, odd years   Credits: 3

ENGL 313 : Eighteenth-Century Lit:
A study of literature from the Restoration and Eighteenth century. Prerequisites: ENGL 203. Offered spring, even years   Credits: 4

ENGL 314 : Nineteenth Century Lit:
A study of literature of the 1800s with subtitles designating relevant subjects, including U.S., British, and international literature of the time. These courses emphasize texts in relation to history, including the social and cultural dimensions of the nineteenth century. Prerequisites: ENGL 203. Offered fall, even years   Credits: 4

ENGL 315 : Victorian Literature
A study of poetry, fiction, and non-fiction prose of the period 1837-1901. Issues include sexual politics, the morality of capitalism, and the impact of science on culture. Authors include Carlyle, Tennyson, Dickens, the Brontes, and Hardy. Prerequisites: ENGL 170. Offered spring, even years   Credits: 3

ENGL 316 : Modern British Literature
A study of significant literary figures and trends in British intellectual history from the late-19th to the mid-20th century. Representative authors include Conrad, Yeats, Lawrence, Joyce, and Woolf. Offered fall, odd years   Credits: 3

ENGL 317 : Contemporary British Lit
A study of British literature since 1945. Focal points include post-World War II aesthetic and philosophical developments, the decline of the British Empire, and broader societal changes informed by race, class, gender, and sexuality. Authors may include Amis, Barnes, Beckett, Duffy, Heaney, Jureishi, McEwan, Osborne, Pinter, Rushdie, X. Smith, Spark, Swift, Winterson. Prerequisites: ENGL 170. Offered fall, even years   Credits: 3

ENGL 318 : Black British Lit & Culture
A study of works by representative Black British writers from the mid-20th century onward in their cultural and social contexts. The course will cover a variety of genres, focusing theoretically on the development of Black British literature, and being framed through these initial questions: Who is English in that nation?s imaginary? Who is not? Does Englishness mean WHITE only, as Catherine Hall has so persuasively demonstrated by retelling some of that country?s history in relation to its colonies? Black British Literature has historically coincided not only with the questioning of what constitutes a British identity but with critical articulations of the issues of full citizenship and belonging. Prerequisites: ENGL 203 or permission of instructor.   Credits: 4

ENGL 319 : Literary Theory
A study of major trends in literary theory in the twentieth century. Offered: every spring Prerequisites: ENGL 170 and two courses in literature (with ENGL, SPAN, or FREN prefix) or permission of instructor. Offered every spring   Credits: 3

ENGL 320 : Irish Literature
A study of works, mainly from the 1880s to the present, by representative Irish and Northern Irish authors writing in English. Works will be examined in their historical contexts. Authors may include W.B. Yeats, John Synge, James Joyce, Elizabeth Bowen, Samuel Beckett, Edna O?Brien, Eavan Boland, and Seamus Heaney. Prerequisite: ENGL 203   Credits: 4

ENGL 321 : British Drama:
A study of a selected grouping of non-Shakespearean British plays drawn from a major era of dramatic literature (such as Renaissance, Jacobean, Restoration, or 18th-century) or focusing on a selection of particular types of drama (e.g., romantic or classical drama, revenge tragedy, comedy of manners). (May be taken for credit twice under different subtitles.) Prerequisites: ENGL 170. Offered when demand is sufficient   Credits: 3

ENGL 324 : The British Novel:
A study of representative major novels emphasizing the development of the British novel as a literary form. Typical offerings are the rise of the novel; the picaresque novel; quest novels; psychological and social realism in the novel; the 19th-century British novel; and Fielding, Richardson, Austen, Dickens, and Lawrence. (May be taken for credit twice under different subtitles.) Prerequisites: ENGL 170. Offered when demand is sufficient   Credits: 3

ENGL 329 : American Visions:
A critical study of a theme, movement, or special subject matter of some consequence in the cultural tradition of the United States. Representative offerings might include The Environmental Spirit, Women Writers and Social Reform, Film Heroes, The Puritan Legacy, and The Graphic Novel. (May be taken for credit twice under different subtitles.) Prerequisite: ENGL 203. Credits: Offered every fall   Credits: 4

ENGL 330 : American Romanticism
A study of representative literature of the pre-Civil War period (1821-61), with emphasis on major figures such as Thoreau, Melville, and Hawthorne. Prerequisites: ENGL 170. Offered every spring   Credits: 3

ENGL 331 : American Realism
A study of representative literature written between 1865-1918, emphasizing the reaction against Romanticism and a new concentration on social, political, and artistic concerns. Prerequisites: ENGL 170. Offered when demand is sufficient   Credits: 3

ENGL 332 : Early American Literature
A study of representative literature from the first European encounters of the New World through the turn of the 19th Century. Prerequisites: ENGL 170. Offered fall, even years   Credits: 3

ENGL 333 : Modern American Literature
A study of representative writers and important works from the period between the two world wars. Prerequisites: ENGL 170. Offered every fall   Credits: 3

ENGL 335 : Asian American Lit Survey
A study of works by representative Asian American writers from a range of backgrounds (might include but not exclusive to American writers of Chinese, Japanese, Korean, Filipino, South Asian, Vietnamese and Cambodian ancestry) from the early 20th century onward in their cultural and social contexts. The course will cover a variety of genres. Prerequisite: ENGL 203.   Credits: 4

ENGL 336 : Native American Literature
A study of works by representative Native AMerican writiers in their cultural and social contexts. The course will cover a variety of genres. Prerequisites: ENGL 203 or permission of instructor.   Credits: 4

ENGL 337 : African-American Literature
A study of works by representative African-American writers from the mid-19th century to the present in their cultural and social contexts. The course will cover a variety of genres. Prerequisites: ENGL 203. Offered every spring   Credits: 4

ENGL 338 : Contemporary Lit:
A study of representative important writers and trends during the late 20th and 21st centuries. Prerequisites: ENGL 203. Offered fall, odd years   Credits: 4

ENGL 339 : American Ways:
Advanced critical study of a theme, movement, or special subject matter in the U.S. cultural tradition. Representative offerings are Women Writers and 19th Century Social Reform, Literature and Film of the Cold War, and The Harlem Renaissance. (May be taken for credit twice under different subtitles.) NOTE: Some sections of ENGL 339 featuring a significant concentration on film studies may be scheduled 3(2-2) to permit extended time for the viewing and discussion of films. Prerequisites: ENGL 170. Offered every spring   Credits: 3

ENGL 340 : Lit & Lit Study in Digital Age
Digital technology is transforming the way we produce, distribute, and study literature. Under the umbrella term ?digital humanities,? scholars are building electronic archives that put literary texts in historical, biographical, geographical, and other contexts; using computational tools to analyze and visualize the form and content of texts; creating new platforms for scholarly communication about texts; and trying to understand the larger cultural impact of the digital revolution. This course undertakes a close examination of all these developments while also introducing students to basic tools for digital communication, preservation, and textual analysis. Prerequisite: ENGL 203.   Credits: 4

ENGL 341 : The Romantic Hero
A study of the literary and cultural significance of the figure of the Romantic hero as exemplified in the works of major authors from the 18th to the 20th century and selected from several national literatures. Offered when demand is sufficient   Credits: 3

ENGL 342 : World Literature
The comparative study of significant literary works from cultural traditions across the world. May be designed around a central theme/topic that is cross-culturally relevant. Prerequisites: ENGL 203.   Credits: 4

ENGL 343 : Women & Literature:
An advanced course in literature by or about women designed to foster new insights into gender roles, identity politics, sexuality, class and race, through an examination of literary and cultural representation. Readings are informed by feminist theory and literary criticism. (Maybe taken for credit twice under different subtitles.) Prerequisites: ENGL 170. Offered every fall   Credits: 3

ENGL 345 : Gay & Lesbian Literature
This course examines twentieth-century Anglo-American lesbian and gay literature and culture. We will explore a range of representational practices against the emergence of a modern homosexual subculture and identity with special attention to, for instance, social constructions of gender and sexuality, feminism, class, ethnicity, and race. Our reading will be informed by a discussion of key concepts (such as the closet, coming out, butch/femme, cross-dressing, and camp), theoretical essays (Butler and Sedgwick, for example) and historical turning-points (such as the trial of Oscar Wilde, the ban on Hall's novel, and Stonewall and AIDS). Prerequisites: ENGL 170. Offered spring, even years   Credits: 3

ENGL 348 : European Literature:
Studies of European literature in translation dealing with selected periods, styles, genres, themes, and writers. Typical offerings are medieval literature, Tolstoy and Dostoyevsky, Romanticism, French novels, and Ibsen and Strindberg, (May be taken for credit twice under different subtitles.) Prerequisites: ENGL 170. Offered when demand is sufficient   Credits: 3

ENGL 350 : Chaucer & His Age
A study of Chaucer's major poetry read in the light of the literary, social, artistic, and philosophical concerns of the High Middle Ages. Prerequisites: ENGL 170. Offered spring, even years   Credits: 3

ENGL 353 : Milton: Prose & Poetry
A study of the principal prose and poetical works against the background of the English Civil War. Prerequisites: ENGL 170. Offered spring, odd years   Credits: 3

ENGL 354 : Shakespeare I
A critical study of selected plays by Shakespeare, including close analyses of representative histories, comedies, tragedies, and romances, such as Richard II, A Midsummer Night's Dream, Othello, and The Tempest. Prerequisites: ENGL 170. Offered every fall   Credits: 3

ENGL 355 : Shakespeare II
A course which parallels Engl 354 in offering a critical study of selected additional plays, including histories, comedies, tragedies, and romances such as 1 Henry IV, As You Like It, Macbeth, and The Winter's Tale. Prerequisites: ENGL 170. Offered every spring   Credits: 3

ENGL 358 : Major Authors:
Comprehensive studies of the works of from one to three authors. (May be taken for credit twice under different subtitles.) Prerequisites: ENGL 170.   Credits: 3

ENGL 359 : Film Authors
This course considers the work of one to three film directors through a close examination of their films, and explores authorship" as a concept with a constantly evolving and historically contingent definition. In doing so, we will consider whether, when, and how a director and/or his or her biographical history is considered a substantial influence on a film's meaning. Crucially, we will consider these films in relation to their historical moments and audiences. Prerequisites: Another film course or permission of the instructor. Offered when demand is sufficient   Credits: 0-3

ENGL 360 : M/Post-Colonial Lit:
A study of works that have emerged out of different experiences of (de)colonization and asserted themselves by foregrounding their difference from the assumptions of an imperial center. The course will cover a variety of genres, and the works will be read in their cultural, social, and historical contexts. (May be taken for credit twice under different subtitles.) Prerequisites: ENGL 203. Offered spring, even years   Credits: 4

ENGL 361 : History of English Language
This course is a historical survey of the English language, introducing the techniques of historical linguistic research and contrasting the phonology, grammar, and lexicon of Old and Middle English with that of Modern British and American English. The course also considers the growth and distribution of ?World Englishes,? including Canadian, Indian, Southern Hemisphere varieties as well as English creoles and pidgins. Students also contribute to an updated edition of the Dictionary of Geneseo English. Prerequisites: ENGL 203. Offered fall, even years   Credits: 4

ENGL 366 : Connections-Early Lit:
This course charts the historical movement of literature in the British Isles from earliest Anglo-Saxon documents to the Restoration. The major periods of Anglo-Saxon/Early Celtic, Anglo-Norman, Middle English, and Early Modern anchor a survey of representative works and authors (e.g. Beowulf, Chaucer, Julian of Norwich, Malory, Spenser, Donne, Milton). The course emphasizes historical, political and cultural events through which this literature was produced; the development of genres and poetics over time; and changes in language, especially in the ways that English has changed from Old English to Early Modern. (May be taken for credit twice under different subtitles.) Prerequisite: ENGL 203.   Credits: 4

ENGL 367 : Connections-Modern Lit:
A study of selected Anglophone literary texts written between 1660 and 1900 focusing on the dynamic relationship between individual works and the broader culture from which they emerge. The course emphasizes historical, political and social events through which this literature was produced; the development of genres and poetics over time; and important changes in language. Representative offerings include: Poetry of the Augustan Age; Victorian Comedy; Literature of 19th Century Social Reform; Napoleon in British Literature; Antebellum Literature; Silver Fork Fiction; Virtual Thoreau; Transatlantic Romantic Prose. (May be taken for credit twice under different subtitles.) Prerequisite: ENGL 203. Offered at least once a year.   Credits: 4

ENGL 368 : Connections-Recent Lit:
A study of selected Anglophone literary texts written after 1900 focusing on the dynamic relationship between individual works and the broader culture from which they emerge. The course emphasizes historical, political and social events through which this literature was produced; the development of genres and poetics over time; and important changes in language. Representative offerings include: Literature of the Twenties; Realist Fiction and the Depression Era; The Image of Islam; British Literature and Fascism; Hip-Hop Culture and Contemporary Literature. (May be taken for credit twice under different subtitles.) Prerequisite: ENGL 203. Offered at least once a year.   Credits: 4

ENGL 370 : Senior Reading
Class time will be spent discussing revising the students' body of work, determining appropriate material for reading/presentation and responding to poetry and fiction readings both on campus and at nearby colleges and universities. Prerequisites: Admission to creative writing track.   Credits: 1

ENGL 381 : Classical Literature
Classical literature?the literature of ancient Greek and Roman civilization?is the origin of the idea of canonical literature, the idea of a ?classic.? Readings for this course will explore those ?classics? in numerous genres from drama, philosophical dialogue, lyric, poetic narrative, and epic, from authors including Homer, Euripides, Sappho, Virgil, Ovid, Horace, and Catullus. The course grounds these writers in the context of history, and art, as well as representative literary scholarship and theory relevant to this period in literature. Prerequisites: ENGL 203. Not offered on a regular basis   Credits: 4

ENGL 382 : The Bible as Literature
This course evaluates the English Bible as a literary text, with readings from the Hebrew and Christian Scriptures (including the Apocrypha). Along with historical and cultural backgrounds, emphasis will be placed on literary genres present in (and sometimes unique to) the Bible, aspects of biblical language and poetics, and the intratextuality of biblical texts. The course will also compare the Bible?s relationship with the text of the Qur?an and with readings and research in biblical influences on Western and world literature. Prerequisite: ENGL 203. Offered every spring   Credits: 4

ENGL 386 : Western Drama 1870-1945
A study of Continental, English, and American drama and selected readings in dramatic theory and criticism from 1870-1945. Prerequisites: ENGL 203. . Offered spring, odd years   Credits: 4

ENGL 388 : Experimental:
  Credits: 0-4

ENGL 390 : Studies in Literature:
Comparative or critical study of a literary type, movement, or figure chosen by the instructor. Some characteristic offerings are Existentialist literature, Drama of the Sixties, and Literature and the Jazz Age. (May be taken for credit twice under different subtitles.) Prerequisites: ENGL 170. Offered when demand is sufficient   Credits: 3

ENGL 393 : Honors Thesis Research/Writing
Two semesters of individual research and writing, directed by a member of the Department of English, for the composing of an undergraduate thesis. The thesis may be a work of literary analysis or a collection of original creative writing. To be eligible to enroll in the first semester of research, students must have completed 75 semester hours, including 24 hours in English, with a grade point average of 3.7 in the English major and 3.3 overall in the College. The Departmental Honors Committee, which grants permission for English honors and approves thesis proposals, may make exceptions to the eligibility criteria for students of demonstrable talent. To receive "English Honors" recognition at graduation, the student must complete 6 hours of English 393 with a grade of "A." English Honors students are encouraged to elect ENGL 319 Literary Theory and ENGL 394 Senior Seminar. Credits for English 393 may not be applied to the 36-hour English major. 3(0-6) each semester. Prerequisites: ENGL 170. Offered by individual arrangement   Credits: 1-6

ENGL 394 : Senior Seminar:
Selected intensive studies of a focused topic in literature with a significant component of guided research. Sample topics include: Dante, the Bloomsbury Group, Metaphysical Poetry, the Epic Novel, the Confessional Hero, Ben Jonson and Classical Tradition, Literature and the Irrational, and Contemporary American Novelists. Prerequisites: ENGL 170 and three 300 level courses or permission of instructor. Offered when demand is sufficient   Credits: 3

ENGL 395 : Internship:
  Credits: 1-12

ENGL 398 : 20th Century Poetry
Close readings from a number of national literatures, with an emphasis on emerging trends. (Works not written in English are read in the best translations available.) Prerequisites: ENGL 170. Offered spring, even years   Credits: 3

ENGL 399 : Directed Study
Individual study and research under the supervision of a faculty member. (May be taken at any level.) (One to three semester hours.) Offered by individual arrangement.   Credits: 1-4

ENGL 402 : Senior Sem in Creative Writing
This is the capstone class for English majors pursuing the creative writing track. Students will select, revise and polish work for presentation at their Senior Reading. In addition, students will learn all aspects of staging a literary event, including publicity and advertising. Finally, students will learn the practical skills of pursuing a literary life beyond Geneseo. Required for all English majors pursuing the creative writing track. Prerequisite: Senior Standing in Creative Writing track. Offered every spring English Courses   Credits: 4

ENGL 403 : Poetry:
Advanced study of poetry focusing on in depth analysis of a topic, issue, genre feature, or single or small group of authors. Course requirements include substantial reading and engagement of relevant critical and theoretical writings. (May be taken for credit twice under different subtitles.) Prerequisites: ENGL 203 or permission of instructor.   Credits: 4

ENGL 410 : Topics in Theory:
Another course, ENGL 419: Literary Theory II covers this topic by offering a survey of ?major trends in literary theory in the twentieth century.? This course, in contrast, will examine one particular subset of literary theory; possible offerings include (but are not limited to) ?Feminist Theory,? ?Post-colonial Theory,? ?Existentialism? and ?Postmodern Theory.? (May be taken for credit twice under different subtitles.). Prerequisites: ENGL 203 or permission of instructor and at least one ENGL 300-level course. Not offered on a regular basis   Credits: 4

ENGL 413 : Topics-Eighteenth Cen Lit:
A study of selected works in literature primarily in or developing from the Eighteenth Century, seen within one of multiple contexts such as themes, cultural issues, intellectual movements, nationhood, and genre. (May be taken for credit twice under different subtitles.) Prerequisites: ENGL 203 or permission of instructor.   Credits: 4

ENGL 414 : Topics-Nineteenth Cen Lit:
An advanced study of literature written during the nineteenth century; because this course is at the 400-level, particular attention will be paid to published critical perspectives on primary works or into important primary contextual documents. Possible subtitles include: The Civil War and Literature, British Romanticism, French Realist Writers. Course can be taken for credit twice under different subtitles. Prerequisites: ENGL 203 and at least one course at the 300 level; or permission of instructor. Offered spring, even years   Credits: 4

ENGL 419 : Literary Theory II
A study of major trends in literary theory in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Prerequisites: ENGL 203 or permission of instructor.   Credits: 4

ENGL 420 : Topics in Irish Lit:
A study of selected works in Irish and / or Northern Irish literature, seen within one of multiple contexts such as themes, cultural issues, intellectual movements, nationhood, and genre. (May be taken for credit twice under different subtitles.) Prerequisites: ENGL 203 or permission of instructor.   Credits: 4

ENGL 424 : The Novel:
A study of representative novels emphasizing the development of the Anglophone novel as a literary form. Course topics include The Rise of the Novel; the Picaresque Novel in English; the Nineteenth-Century British Novel; Dandyism and the Novel; the American Civil War Novel; The Novel during the Interwar Period; and the Black British Novel. (May be taken for credit twice under different subtitles.) Offered when demand is sufficient. Prerequisites: ENGL 203 or permission of instructor.   Credits: 4

ENGL 425 : Enterprises:
A course organized around projects that draw upon critical and writing skills for applications beyond the college classroom: service learning, community partnerships, field-based research, web archives, etc. Students will be expected to work both independently and in collaboration with others. (May be taken for credit twice under different subtitles.) Prerequisites: ENGL 203. Not offered on a regular basis   Credits: 4

ENGL 426 : Editing & Production Workshop
  Credits: 4

ENGL 427 : Lit Representations-Disability
A study of selected works seen within the context of disability studies. Prerequisites: ENGL 203 or permission of instructor.   Credits: 4

ENGL 439 : American Ways II:
Advanced critical study of a theme, movement, or special subject in the U.S. cultural tradition?for example, Women Writers and 19th-Century Social Reform, Filming the 70s, and The Harlem Renaissance. (May be taken for credit twice under different subtitles.) Prerequisites: ENGL 203.   Credits: 4

ENGL 443 : Women & Literature:
An advanced course in literature by or about women designed to offer new insights into gender roles, identity politics, sexuality, class, race and ability through an examination of literary and cultural representations. Readings are informed by feminist theory and literary criticism. May be taken twice under different subtitles. Prerequisites: ENGL 203, at least one course at the 300-level or by permission of instructor.   Credits: 4

ENGL 450 : Chaucer & His Age
A study of the major poetry of Geoffrey Chaucer together with an examination of other literary figures from the High and Late Middle Ages, and in the light of major literary, political, artistic, and philosophical concerns of the time. Prerequisites: ENGL 203   Credits: 4

ENGL 454 : Shakespeare
An in-depth study of from eight to ten Shakespeare plays selected from the different genres (comedy, history, tragedy, and romance) in which the poet-dramatist worked. Prerequisites: ENGL 203 or permission of instructor.   Credits: 4

ENGL 458 : Major Authors:
This class will feature a close reading of Malory?s Le Morte Darthur?the most complete collection of the legends of King Arthur in the later Middle Ages (and one of the first books to be printed in English). The course will also look closely translations of earlier Latin and French sources (Geoffrey of Monmouth?s History of the Kings of Britain and the anonymous French Quest of the Holy Grail) to understand more about the sources that Malory reshaped. Along with sources, this course will study contested biographical issues, textual and manuscript sources, the historical context of the fifteenth century and the Wars of the Roses, and critical treatments of Malory and Arthurian literature. Finally, the course considers the offshoots of the Malorian tradition in English literature and popular culture. The course is a seminar and requires active participation by all members of the claims. (May be taken for credit twice under different subtitles.) Prerequisites: ENGL 203 or permission of instructor.   Credits: 4

ENGL 486 : Drama:
Advanced study of dramatic literature focusing on in depth study of a topic, issue, genre, or single or small group of authors. Course requirements include substantial reading and engagement of relevant critical and theoretical writings as well as dramatic works. Class readings will be supplemented with a schedule of required out of class performances, lectures, events, etc. (May be taken for credit twice under different subtitles.) Prerequisites: ENGL 203.   Credits: 4

ENGL 488 : Experimental:
  Credits: 0-4

ENGL 499 : Directed Study
  Credits: 1-6

ENGL 501 : Creative Writing
Practice in writing fiction, drama, or poetry, with emphasis on individual writers and manuscripts. May be repeated for a total of 6 semester hours, under advisement only. Offered: when demand is sufficient   Credits: 4

ENGL 506 : Writing for Teachers
This course offers writing instruction to graduate students who intend to teach. Students read writing theory, review English grammar, and write a series of essays over the course of the term. You will be required to present your research findings on writing and pedagogy to the class. Offered: every semester   Credits: 4

ENGL 544 : Master's Studies inBritish Lit
Studies in selected representative poetry, drama, and fiction in England from Chaucer to the 20th century. Offered: alternate spring semester   Credits: 4

ENGL 545 : Master's Std in American Lit
Studies in selected representative poetry and fiction in America from colonial times to the 20th century. Offered: alternate spring semester   Credits: 4

ENGL 560 : English Language
Introduction to the study of English, including systems of phonology, morphology, syntax, and semantics as well as historical and sociological aspects. Particular emphasis is placed upon applications to the teaching of American English at primary and secondary levels and upon uses of language study in literary analysis. Offered: when demand is sufficient   Credits: 4

ENGL 588 : Experimental:
  Credits: 0-12

ENGL 599 : Directed Study:
  Credits: 1-12

ENGL 688 : Experimental:
  Credits: 0-4

ENGL 699 : Directed Study:
  Credits: 1-12

FMST 100 : F/Intro to Film Studies
An examination of world cinema, emphasizing the technological, formal, cultural and historical specificity of the moving image. Offered every fall   Credits: 0-4

FMST 270 : Video Production
The course will introduce students to basic video skills. Examples include preparing a shooting script, story boarding, camera basics, executing a video shoot, input and output of video into a nonlinear editing system, and nonlinear editing. Students will collaborate on short projects such as a commercial or music video to conquer basic skills then design and execute a final, individual video project. Prerequisite: FMST 100   Credits: 0-4

FMST 310 : Screenwriting
Screenwriting is a study and practice of writing the feature film screenplay. The principle of character, environment, plot and event, dramatic force and arc, dialogue, music, and the physical format of the professional script will be covered. Prerequisite: ENGL 201.   Credits: 4

FMST 369 : Connections in Film:
A critical study of a theme, era, movement, genre, cross-cultural study or special subject matter involving the moving image including cinema, television, and related visual texts. This is not a film authors course. Includes a separate lab for film screenings. Offered once a year.   Credits: 0-4

FMST 409 : Film Theory & Criticism
This is an upper division course that seeks an advanced understanding of film as a complex cultural and philosophical medium through the discussion of key theoretical and critical approaches, which may include realist theory, genre criticism, auteur theory, structuralism and poststructuralism, feminist theory, digital media and cultural studies. Prerequisites: ENGL 285.   Credits: 4

FMST 459 : Film Authors
This course considers the work of one to three film directors through a close examination of their films, and explores ?authorship? as a concept with a constantly evolving and historically contingent definition. In doing so, we will consider whether, when, and how a director and/or his or her biographical history is considered a substantial influence on a film?s meaning. Crucially, we will consider these films in relation to their historical moments and audiences. Prerequisites: FMST 100 or permission of the instructor. Offered at least once a year   Credits: 0-4

FMST 499 : Directed Study:
  Credits: 1-6

INTD 105 : Writing Seminar:
Writing Seminar is a course focusing on a specific topic while emphasizing writing practice and instruction, potentially taught by any member of the College faculty. Because this is primarily a course in writing, reading assignments will be briefer than in traditional topic courses, and students will prove their understanding of the subject matter through writing compositions rather than taking examinations. Required of all freshmen. Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to freshmen.   Credits: 3

INTD 210 : Topics in Film:
Exploration of various aspects in film from specific personages to focuses such as cinema history, specific genres,and cross-cultural studies. May be taken twice under different subtitles. Offered once a year   Credits: 0-3

LATN 201 : L/Intermediate Latin I
Intensive readings (in the original) of significant works by major Latin authors. Representative offerings would include such texts as Virgil's Aeneid, Ovid's Metamorphosis, Augustine's Confessions, and Boethius' Consolation of Philosophy. Prerequisites: One year of college Latin (101-102 at Geneseo) or two or more years of high school Latin. Offered on a 3-semester rotation   Credits: 3

LATN 202 : Intermediate Latin II
A continuation of LATN 201 at a higher level of difficulty. Prerequisites: LATN 201. Offered when demand is sufficient   Credits: 3

LATN 301 : Readings in Latin:
See description of Latin 201/202. Prerequisites: Intermediate college Latin (201/202) or 4 or more years of high school Latin. Not offered on a regular basis   Credits: 3

LATN 302 : Readings in Latin:
See description of Latin 201/202. Prerequisites: Intermediate college Latin (201/202) or 4 or more years of high school Latin. Not offered on a regular basis   Credits: 3

WMST 100 : Intro to Women's Studies
This course is an introduction to the study of women and gender using interdisciplinary and cross-disciplinary approaches. It will include a feminist analysis of the construction and enforcement of gender differences and gender inequalities in various contexts, with an emphasis on the intersection of race, class, sexuality, and nationality in the lives of women. Topics include but are not limited to: historical constructions of gender, feminist activism, women's issues in global perspective, women's health and reproductive rights, media representations of gender, domestic violence and sexual assault, and feminist theories. Offered: every spring   Credits: 3

WMST 188 : Experimental:
  Credits: 0-12

WMST 201 : Topics in Women's Studies:
This is a slot course that focuses on some aspect of Women's Studies. Each section will incorporate recent feminist scholarship, methodologies, concepts, and analyses in the teaching of a subject of particular importance to women. In addition, each section will utilize feminist pedagogy to foster a climate of mutual inquiry and exchange of ideas between faculty and students. This course may be taken for credit multiple times with different subtitles. Offered: every spring   Credits: 3

WMST 210 : Race, Class & Gender
This course uses multiple disciplines to explore how identity categories of gender, race, and class intersect. Students will explore and critique relations of power in families, societies, and cultures. In class discussion and in writing, students will reflect on their own ideas and thought processes, and they will engage respectfully with differing ideas. Offered: Fall, odd years   Credits: 3

WMST 220 : Gender & Sexualities
This course will involve a multi-disciplinary, feminist exploration of the intersections of gender, culture, and sexuality. The experiences of historically devalued groups, including girls and women, sexual minorities, and people of color will be emphasized. Students will investigate the limitations of binary classification systems as pertaining to gender roles, gendered behavior, sexual behaviors, and sexual orientation. Topics to be covered may include, but are not limited to, sexuality as depicted in Western media, variations in biological sex, gender identity, sexual orientation, socialization and sexual and reproductive freedoms. Offered: fall, even years   Credits: 3

WMST 288 : Experimental:
  Credits: 0-4

WMST 301 : Seminar in Women's Studies
  Credits: 0-3

WMST 395 : Internship:
  Credits: 1-15