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Alice Rutkowski

Associate Professor of English
Welles 222A
585-245-5290
rutkowsk@geneseo.edu

Alice Rutkowski received her Ph.D. from the University of Virginia and became a member of the Geneseo faculty in 2003. She often teaches the courses Literature and the Civil War, Trans and Lit, SafeZone Train the Trainer, Feminism and Pornography, and Major Authors: Melville, among others. Her research centers on the Civil War and Reconstruction as well as queer theory and trans politics. She received the Chancellor's Award for Excellence in Teaching in 2012. In 2016, Rutkowski published “‘It’s a...Penis!’ Epistemology of the Ultrasound” featured in Mothers and Sons. Her other works were published in A Journal of American Women Writers and Studies in the Literary Imagination

Rutkowski is the chair of the Phi Beta Kappa Honors Society selection committee. In 2013, she founded the LGBTQ Issues Working Group and serves as the co-chair. She is a member of the Women’s and Gender Studies Advisory Board. Rutkowski is the coordinator of the Geneseo Safe Zone Network. To request a Safe Zone training for your group, please click here

Classes

  • ENGL 203: Rdr&Text:Asian American Lit

    An introduction to the discipline of English through the study of particular topics, issues, genres, or authors. Subtitles of "Reader and Text" help students develop a working vocabulary for analyzing texts and relating texts to contexts; understand the theoretical questions that inform all critical conversations about textual meaning and value; and participate competently, as writers, in the ongoing conversation about texts and theory that constitutes English as a field of study.

  • ENGL 467: TopModern: Queer 19th Century

    A course focused on a narrowly-defined topic, theme, issue, question, approach, scholarly debate, movement, or group of authors in 1700-1900 literature. In addition to helping students to acquire in-depth understanding of the literature, the course stresses the ability to ?join the conversation? that is always ongoing among critics and scholars regarding texts, authors, and topics by engaging with secondary sources. (May be taken twice for credit under different subtitles.) Prerequisite: ENGL 203. Credits 4(4-0)