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Amanda Lewis-Nang'ea

Assistant Professor
Doty Hall 238
lewisam@geneseo.edu

Dr. Amanda Lewis-Nang'ea is a specialist in African history and the history of science, focusing on the history of pastoralists and wildlife conservation in East Africa. Her work blends oral histories of the Maasai, scientists, conservationists, and wildlife management with archival and scientific research.
 

Office Hours, Fall 2020

Thursday 12-2 pm or by appointment, all via Zoom. If you wish to schedule an appointment and you are not currently in my class, send an email and I will set up a Zoom meeting link for you.

I will not be on campus this semester and I will be on leave Spring 2021.

Curriculum Vitae

Education

  • B.A., King University, Bristol, TN

  • M.A., East Tennessee State University

  • Ph.D., Michigan State University

Classes

  • HIST 284: S/MSt in LACAANAHist:ModAfrica

    A broad study of a particular topic in Latin America/Caribbean/Asia/Africa/Native American (LACAANA) history or global/world histories. Topics could be defined either by time, theme, or space or on a comparative topic, depending on the professor’s expertise. Previous courses have included histories of global sexology, early India, African nationalism, the Arab-Israeli conflict, and science, among others. (May be taken for credit twice under different subtitles.)

  • HIST 480: AdvSt-LACAANAHist:African Env

    This course focuses on an in-depth advanced study of a particular topic in Latin America/Caribbean/Asia/Africa/Native American history. Topics could be defined either by time, theme, or space: the Vietnam War, the history of gender and sexuality in Latin America, Empire and Environment in Africa, the history of Cuba, global histories, Latin American Revolutions, the Mexican Revolution, advanced topics in African, Middle Eastern, Native American, or Asian History, among others. (May be taken for credit twice under different subtitles.) Prerequisite: HIST 302 (HIST 301 also recommended).

  • HONR 207: Hon Sem-Div,Pl,Diff:

    This seminar will provide students the opportunity to examine distinct, overlapping, and shared cultural identities, traditions, and experiences. Each seminar will explore a selected topic through the lens of at least two of the following: race, ethnicity, gender, class, sexual orientation, religion, and disability. Seminar topics may focus on national, international, and/or transnational issues. Typical titles might be: Gender, Culture, and International Development; Religion and Class in Northern Ireland; and African American Migration Narrative. May be repeated more than once only with permission from director of the Honors Program. Prerequisites: HONR 202 or permission of program director. Offered once per year