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Michael Leroy Oberg

Distinguished Professor of History
Doty Hall 208
585-245-5730
oberg@geneseo.edu

Michael Oberg has been a member of the Geneseo faculty since 1998.

Professor Oberg's research interests are in Native American studies. Read his blog, Native America: A History.

 

Curriculum Vitae

Education

  • Ph.D., Syracuse University

Publications

  • Peacemakers: The Iroquois, the United States, and the Treaty of Canandaigua, 1794 (Oxford, 2015)

  • Professional Indian: The American Odyssey of Eleazer Williams(Penn, 2015)

  • Native America: A History (Wiley-Blackwell, 2010)

  • The Head in Edward Nugent's Hand: Roanoke's Forgotten Indians(Pennsylvania, 2008)

  • Samuel Wiseman's Book of Record: The Official Account of Bacon's Rebellion in Virginia, 1676-1677(Lexington, 2005)

  • Uncas: First of the Mohegans(Cornell, 2003)

  • Dominion and Civility: English Imperialism and Native America, 1585-1685(Cornell, 1999)

More About Me

Research Interests

Colonial U.S.
Native American

Awards and Honors

SUNY Distinguished Professor, 2015
Chancellor's Award for Excellence in Scholarship and Creative Activities, 2013
Chancellor's Award for Excellence in Teaching, 2003

Websites

The Sullivan Campaign
The Jesuit Relations and Allied Documents
English Handwriting Lessons, 1500-1700

Announcements

Book: Peacemakers: The Iroquois, the United States, and the Treaty of Canandaigua, 1794

Classes

  • HIST 262: S/M/AmerIndianLaw&PublicPolicy

    Surveys the constitutional status of Indians in the American federal system and the issues and controversies affecting Native American communities and individuals today. We will look as well at the rights of indigenous peoples internationally, with special attention paid to affairs in Canada and Australia. Cross-listed with AMST 262.

  • HIST 302: Rs-Hs:Native America,1523-1840

    This is one of two required skills-based seminars in the History major that form prerequisites for upper level classes. This course is focused on critical analysis of historical evidence and instruction in historical research methods and writing. Students read, evaluate, and critique a range of different types of primary source evidence, practice locating and retrieving reliable primary and secondary sources, and use these skills to support the crafting of historical arguments in both short papers and longer research projects. All sections will focus on a specific set of historical issues and/or events chosen by the instructor and class content emphasizes work with primary sources specific to the seminar topic. The class is reading and writing intensive. Majors may take HIST 301 and 302 in any sequence, and should plan to complete both HIST 301 and 302 during the sophomore or junior year. Prerequisites: Sophomore standing or higher. Multiple sections offered every fall & spring semester.