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Fall 2018 to Spring 2019

May 17, 2019, 2:30-3:45pm (Doty 302E)

Title: Moving from Learning Outcomes to Integrative Learning: A Case for Employing Instructional Design Principles to the Curriculum

Who: Kimberly Hoffman, University of Rochester

Description: As SUNY Geneseo's curriculum adopts the GLOBE framework, creative, practical, and purposeful thought must be given to modifying and enhancing existing courses and programs in order to successfully achieve the newly written outcomes. Kicking off a 2017-2018 series of Instructional Design (ID) workshops, this first program will introduce definitions and models of instructional design that can help faculty and staff shift the ways in which they approach their program, course, and/or assignment design. Examples of ID in action and a quick interactive exercise will support concrete applications of theory to practice.

April 22, 2019, 2:30-3:30pm (Milne 208)

Title: Syllabus and Course Re-Design Workshop Series

Description: Teaching a new course in Fall 2019? Looking to refresh an old course that’s gone stale? Bring your syllabus to this series of working sessions to share ideas, brainstorm, and consider ways to approach that tricky course. This is a chance to set aside dedicated time to work with colleagues on your syllabus/course design. Discussions will depend on those in the room, but could include:

  • What do you want your students to learn?
  • Writing and communicating learning outcomes
  • What is the best use of class time?
  • Obtaining feedback on how the course is going
  • Designing exams, quizzes, and other assessment mechanisms
  • Making the most of Canvas in your course design
  • Student Centered Teaching & Growth Mindset

Feel free to attend one or more of these sessions scheduled: Feb 25, March 25, and April 22 (all 2:30-3:30 pm in Milne 208)

April 10, 2019, 2:30-3:45pm (Doty 300, Tower Room)

Title: Academic Freedom and Where to Find It

Who: Risa L. Lieberwitz, Professor of Labor and Employment Law, ILR School, Cornell University; General Counsel, American Association of University Professors (AAUP)

Description: What does academic freedom mean? Does it extend beyond teaching and research? Does it include rights to due process? Professor Lieberwitz will address the role of institutional policies, collective bargaining, and shared governance in protecting academic freedom in teaching, research, and public speech.

April 1, 2019, 2:30pm - 3:45pm (Milne 208)

Title: Peer-led workshops: A new model for supporting student learning in large-enrollment courses

Who:  Suann Yang and Jani Lewis, Biology

Description: Large-enrollment courses come with their own set of special challenges, particularly when it comes to an instructor's ability to offer office hours or help sessions that can reach a large proportion of the class. Please join us to learn about our Biology Department's new system of supporting student success: peer-led workshops. Find out how a team of faculty instructors and student workshop leaders is developing and implementing active-learning workshops for general biology (BIOL 117 and 119), and contribute your ideas and thoughts about how this program could be improved and/or adopted for your courses.

April 1, 2019, 11:30am - 12:30pm (Milne 208)

Title: Conversations to Inspire Change: Dialogue on Ableism

Who:  Gillian Paku, English and robbie routenberg, Chief Diversity Officer

Description: Conversation - an oral exchange of ideas and opinions. This ongoing series of conversations is meant to explore conventions and beliefs in order to open people up to the possibility of change. Dr. Gillian Paku (English) and robbie routenberg (Chief Diversity Officer) will facilitate this dialogue and self-reflection on ableism - discrimination and social prejudice against people with [dis]abilities.

March 29, 2019, 4:00-6:00pm (Big Tree Inn)

Title: Faculty Connectivus

Purpose: to provide junior and senior faculty members with an opportunity to meet each other face-to-face and chat about shared research and scholarly interests in a casual setting.

What to Expect:

  • Several brief presentation before the main event.
  • Overview of “speed networking” format and rotation map.
  • Three sets of 15 minute discussions with faculty with complementary scholarly interests.
  • Hors d’oeuvres, soft drinks, coffee, and cash bar.

March 25, 2019, 2:30-3:30pm (Milne 208)

Title: Syllabus and Course Re-Design Workshop Series

Description: Teaching a new course in Fall 2019? Looking to refresh an old course that’s gone stale? Bring your syllabus to this series of working sessions to share ideas, brainstorm, and consider ways to approach that tricky course. This is a chance to set aside dedicated time to work with colleagues on your syllabus/course design. Discussions will depend on those in the room, but could include:

  • What do you want your students to learn?
  • Writing and communicating learning outcomes
  • What is the best use of class time?
  • Obtaining feedback on how the course is going
  • Designing exams, quizzes, and other assessment mechanisms
  • Making the most of Canvas in your course design
  • Student Centered Teaching & Growth Mindset

Feel free to attend one or more of these sessions scheduled: Feb 25, March 25, and April 22 (all 2:30-3:30 pm in Milne 208)

March 11, 2019, noon - 1:30pm (Milne 208)

Title: Advising Special Populations

Who: Leah Houk and Heather Wilhelm Routenberg, Office of Academic Planning and Advising; Heather Packer, Disabilities Services

Description: Join the offices of Academic Planning & Advising, Disability Services and AOP for a "lunch and learn" discussion to explore the relationship between academic advising and working with students from traditionally at-risk populations. How do social identity, background and experiences influence a student’s relationship to the advising process and how can we, as professionals, operate from a holistic perspective? We’ll explore questions of power dynamics, definitions of success and their potential barriers, and the importance of using a strengths-based approach in advising students.

March 8, 2019, 2:00-3:45pm (Erwin 206)

Title: Fulbright Scholar Program Opportunities

Who: Sue Rubright, Office of Sponsored Research

Description: This meeting will present information about the Fulbright Scholar Program that will help faculty members decide if becoming a Fulbright scholar is right for them. The topics covered in the presentation include:

  • Overview of the Core Fulbright U.S. Scholar Program, including its history, purpose, administration, choices in length of commitment, deadlines, and types of awards
  • Eligibility Requirements
  • Navigating the Fulbright Website/Catalog
  • Application Components
  • Identifying a Host Institution
  • Submitting a Competitive Application
  • The Review Process
  • Fulbright Grant Benefits and Support
  • Geneseo’s Support and Process for a Fulbright Application
  • Other Fulbright Programs

March 4, 2019, noon - 1:30pm (Milne 208)

Title: Advising Roundtable

Who: Leah Houk and Heather Wilhelm Routenberg, Office of Academic Planning and Advising; Megan Kennerknecht, Financial Aid

Description: Advising for fall 2019 is just around the corner! Join staff from the offices of Academic Planning and Advising and Financial Aid to broaden your understanding of financial aid policy changes that impact advising. Topics will include how the courses students take affect their aid eligibility and pertinent information about academic policies and procedures (academic standing, cross-registration, transfer credit, etc.). There will also be time to discuss advising tips with colleagues from other departments.

February 25, 2019, 2:30-3:30pm (Milne 208)

Title: Syllabus and Course Re-Design Workshop Series

Description: Teaching a new course in Fall 2019? Looking to refresh an old course that’s gone stale? Bring your syllabus to this series of working sessions to share ideas, brainstorm, and consider ways to approach that tricky course. This is a chance to set aside dedicated time to work with colleagues on your syllabus/course design. Discussions will depend on those in the room, but could include:

  • What do you want your students to learn?
  • Writing and communicating learning outcomes
  • What is the best use of class time?
  • Obtaining feedback on how the course is going
  • Designing exams, quizzes, and other assessment mechanisms
  • Making the most of Canvas in your course design
  • Student Centered Teaching & Growth Mindset

Feel free to attend one or more of these sessions scheduled: Feb 25, March 25, and April 22 (all 2:30-3:30 pm in Milne 208)

February 25, 2019, noon - 1:30pm (Milne 208)

Title: Developmental Advising and Growth Mindset

Who: Leah Houk and Heather Wilhelm Routenberg, Office of Academic Planning and Advising

Description: Do you feel comfortable advising students about their future courses in their major? How about addressing other questions and concerns that inevitably arise? Come share lunch with staff from the Office of Academic Planning and Advising to learn more about the Developmental Advising Model, as well as how to support our students in developing a growth mindset and building the skills they need to thrive in college.

February 20, 2019, 2:30-3:45pm (Milne 213)

Title: Open Teaching Practices in Action at Geneseo

Who:  Barbara Welker (Anthropology), George Reuter (Math), Lee Pierce (Communication), and Alexis Clifton (Director of Open Teaching & Learning, SUNY OER Services * SUNY Geneseo)

Description: Join Barbara Welker (Anthropology), George Reuter (Math), and Lee Pierce (Communication) for a conversation about open educational practices in action on our campus. We will look at motivations to use open educational resources (OER) in our classrooms and what impacts we've seen from their use. We welcome conversation about other uses of OER and open pedagogy on campus. We will share ideas & resources for how to get started or expand on your current open practices.

February 12, 2019, 1:30-2:30pm (Milne 208)

Title: Conversations to Inspire Change: Dialogue on Whiteness

Who:  Colin Zestcott, Psychology and robbie routenberg, Chief Diversity Officer

Description: Conversation - an oral exchange of ideas and opinions. This ongoing series of conversations is meant to explore conventions and beliefs in order to open people up to the possibility of change. Dr. Colin Zestcott (Psychology) and robbie routenberg (Chief Diversity Officer) will facilitate this dialogue and self-reflection on the social and cultural issues about what it means to be White.

January 22, 2019, 11:00am-1:00pm (Milne 208)

Title: The Disappearance of Daniel Bennet: An instructional escape experience (lunch provided)

Who: Facilitated by Instructional Librarians, Milne Library

Description: Interested in adding gamification elements into the classroom? The library has a new kit soon to be available: an escape room in a box. Come to the Library to enjoy the experience and talk with colleagues about potential uses.

January 11, 2019, 1:00-3:00pm (Erwin 206)

Title: Comparing Geneseo with SUNY and National Data

Who: Dr. Julie Rao, Director of Institutional Research Date: Friday, January 11, 2019, 1:00-3:00pm (Erwin 206)

Description: Want to learn more about SUNY and national data sources available over the web? Dr. Julie Rao, Director of Institutional Research, will be showing how one can make comparisons across SUNY and how to gather standardized data from schools nationwide. Bring your laptop for this hands on workshop.

November 28, 2018, 2:30-3:45pm (Milne 208)

Title: Student Mental Health and Well-being: Where Do Faculty Fit In?

Who: Laura Swanson, Lauderdale Health & Counseling; Joe Cope, Interim Associate Provost for Student Success

Description: Join us for an informative and engaging TLC session that will include data about college student mental health and an open dialogue about what faculty are noticing in and out of the classroom. Faculty members serve in many vital roles on our campus, not only as educators, experts, researchers, and mentors, but also as key members of our campus community who may be the first ones to notice when students are struggling with their mental health. What is the role of a faculty member in the larger context of student well-being? During this discussion, we hope to examine the common concerns faculty members have about this issue and determine what we can do as a community to better support faculty in supporting students.

November 27, 2018, 11:30am-1:00pm (Doty 302E)

Title: Develop Collaborations with Argentina's Universidad Nacional de Córdoba

Who: Samuel M. Cardamone, M.S., Interim Director, Study Abroad Office

Description: Attendees can either join in person or by video conference on their own computer.

This event is intended for faculty and staff interested in building collaborative partnerships with faculty and staff of the Universidad Nacional de Córdoba (UNC). SUNY Geneseo has enjoyed a fruitful student exchange program with UNC since 2010, and now we work to broaden our relationship by encouraging faculty and staff to consider faculty/staff exchange, leading a study abroad program to Córdoba, joint research, joint publications, Collaborative Online International Learning (COIL), and other activities that will expand our existing partnership. Please come prepared to talk about your existing research agenda as well as areas that you are interested in exploring. We will video conference with faculty and staff of UNC. Lunch will be provided. Please click here to RSVP for this event.

If you are unable to attend in person or by video conference but your are still interested in learning how to get involved with UNC, please complete the RSVP form.

November 6, 2018, 2:00-3:30pm (Doty 302E)

WEBINAR: Your Latinx Students - Initiatives for Support, Engagement & Completion

Who: Dr. Tamara Coronella, Arizona State University

Description: Latinx enrollment in college and universities has increased 240% since 1996 and is expected to continue to grow according to Pew Center Research. It will be imperative for institutions to have the right programs in place to support this growing population and their unique needs.

Latinx students are often described by their statistics — underperforming, unprepared, or lower achieving — statistics that often tell a story about deficiencies rather than highlighting their strengths. Institutions have an opportunity to increase Latinx student success by engaging students' assets and reframing support programs to capitalize on those strengths.

Change the focus from deficits — lack of academic preparedness, lower test scores, first generation, financial need, etc. to focus on assets — their desire to succeed, drive to graduate, individual experiences, ambition etc.

November 5, 2018, 12:00-1:30pm (Doty 302E)

Title: Guided Reflection On Our Practice

Who: robbie routenberg, Chief Diversity Officer

Description: Wondering if others are experiencing the same challenges in their classrooms as you? Successful at trying something new in the classroom that others that you’d like to share? Participate in one or both of these sessions to engage with other faculty from various disciplines about teaching topics that matter to you! This “Reflecting on Teaching” series is intentionally unstructured with an open-space model to allow a forum for us to… well, reflect on what it is we do in the classroom.

October 30, 2018, 2:00-3:30pm (Doty 302E)

WEBINAR: Mentoring Students of Color - Build Relationships That Foster Cross-Cultural Understanding, Trust and Accountability to Ensure Their Success

Who: Daviree L. Velázquez Phillip, Northwestern University and Devita Bishundat, Georgetown University

Description: Traversing predominately white academic environments can be daunting and difficult for students of color. They need mentors who are culturally aware. Mentoring relationships built upon cross-cultural understanding, trust and accountability can impact the sense of belonging and success of students of color – and help to deconstruct the historical and contemporary racism students of color sometimes experience on college campuses. 

Does your institution provide strategies and programs that make students of color feel valued, safe, supported and a sense of belonging throughout their educational experience? 

October 25, 2018, 2:00-3:30pm (South 225)

Title: Condensed Courses: Big on Content, Small on Weeks

Who: Pamela Haibach-Beach, Stephen Gonzalez, and Amanda Shearer, SUNY Brockport

Description: This workshop will discuss best practices and lessons learned for condensing full semester courses to 2, 3 and 5 week courses including in residence, hybrid and online models. Presenters will discuss three different course preparations on condensing courses.

October 24, 2018, 2:30-3:45pm (Milne 213)

Title: Academic Freedom: Protections in the UUP-NYS Contract and Broader Academic Freedom Issues

Who: Jamie Dangler, PhD, Vice President for Academics, United University Professions

Description: This workshop will help faculty and staff understand the Academic Freedom protections provided in UUP’s contract with New York State and SUNY’s Board of Trustees Policies. The significance of these protections for our work on campus and their relation to broader national and international Academic Freedom concerns will be discussed