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Upcoming Programs and Events

Fall Semester 2021

If you require accommodations for equal access to any of the events below, please contact the Office of Accessibility Services via email at access@geneseo.edu, or call 585-245-5112 at least one week prior to this event

Ongoing Every Friday: NAVIGATE Office Hours 9:00-10:00am

In spring 2020, the college offered a “soft” rollout of Geneseo’s early alert software, EAB Navigate. Given the myriad of changes that occurred at that same time, faculty and staff may not have had the opportunity to fully adopt this powerful tool. Therefore, we are offering NAVIGATE “office hours” on most Fridays from 9:00-10:00am via Zoom. This is a chance for you to learn more about EAB Navigate and how it plays a critical role in our effort to catch struggling students early when we can still intervene with support resources. These office hours will be hosted by Dr. Celia Easton, Dean of Academic Planning and Advising, Laurie Fox, Director of Educational Technology, and other members of the EAB Navigate implementation team. Please bring any technical questions regarding the platform as well as conceptual issues about how EAB Navigate supports our students’ success. If this time does not work for you, please reach out to schedule an individual appointment.

Zoom and Google Calendar Link

Monday, December 6, 2021 Leadership Sprint: Building a Great Culture and COVID-19, 11:00 - 11:50am

Presenter:  Laurie Fox, Director of Educational Technology, Computing & Information Technology, SUNY Geneseo

Description: Part of SUNY Center for Professional Development Week. If someone were to ask you, "What's your work culture like now?", what would your answer be? The current pandemic has put stress on our cultural norms and forced many to adapt quickly, with no plan for the future. As offices begin to "return to normal," there is an opportunity to not only capitalize on professional growth and technological advances but to also address pre-COVID ideals that need improvement. 

Bio:  Laurie Fox is SUNY Geneseo's Director of Educational Technology. Her responsibilities include classroom technology, instructional support for using technology in teaching and learning, LMS administration and support, campus technology training, and digital media services. Laurie is a frequent presenter on topics that include leadership, project management, campus communication, and productivity and time management. At Geneseo, she also teaches an online Extreme Learning course on Digital Fluency: Productivity Tools.

Registration is FREE through the SUNY Center for Professional Development

Wednesday, December 8 Self-Care as Professional Development, noon - 1:00pm

Presenter:  Kelly Williamson, Community Manager, SUNY CPD and Eileen Angelini, Ph.D., Associate Dean, School for Graduate Studies, Empire State College

Description: Part of SUNY Center for Professional Development Week. A well-balanced, and healthy team member is a high-performing one. An investment in "loving" yourself can resonate throughout your career and personal life. It can also help you to jump-start your ability to focus on long-term planning.
Not only can self-care make us healthier, but it can help us attune to our authentic selves, allowing us to expand our attention to a wide set of emotions, relationships and resources. Self-care results in better communication, feeling less effects of stress, and allows us to be more present for your colleagues, students, and families. This webinar will highlight various self-care strategies and will provide you with a toolbox of activities to use throughout the years.
The second half of our presentation will include the practice of Chair Yoga, reminding us that movement and stretching are important as many of us are working longer hours in order to deal with the demands of the pandemic. Chair yoga is one solution that will bring increased circulation and exercise into our daily routines. Other benefits include improving flexibility, relieving cramps and stiffness, and creating a happy mental state.

Bio:  Kelly Williamson is the Community Manager at the SUNY Center for Professional Development and oversees the adoption and engagement of the SUNY Workplace community. Kelly is a three-time SUNY graduate, most recently earning her Advanced Graduate Certificate in Project Management from Empire State College. She also holds a BA in Public Relations from SUNY Oswego and an AAS in Business Administration from Morrisville State College. Previously she was the Coordinator of Public Relations and Alumni Communications at Morrisville State College. She lives in Canastota, NY, with her family and two dogs.

Bio:  Eileen M. Angelini, Ph.D., received her B.A. in French from Middlebury College (Middlebury, VT) and her M.A. and Ph.D. in French Studies from Brown University (Providence, RI). She is currently Associate Dean of the School for Graduate Studies at SUNY Empire State College. As Associate Dean, Dr. Angelini leads the academic operations of the School for Graduate Studies. Her primary duties and responsibilities include, but are not limited to: Direct supervision of the school’s faculty in Business, Management and Leadership (BML), Education (ED), and Graduate Liberal Arts and Science (GLAS); Development of new degree and certificate programs; Oversight of faculty recruitment, professional development, and review; Collaboration with the Dean and faculty on academic program review and accreditation; Work with academic division chairs and faculty on policies and processes to ensure course quality; and, Participation with key stakeholders on strategic initiatives and budget planning. She also serves on the SUNY Empire Presidential Task Force to Enhance Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion. A life-long athlete and certified advanced exercise instructor, she lives in Porter Corners, NY with her incredible husband, beautiful daughter, and two adorable cats.

Registration is FREE through the SUNY Center for Professional Development

Wednesday, December 8 Taking the Temperature of Faculty and Staff: How Are You Doing? 2:00-3:45pm

Who: Dave Parfitt (Teaching & Learning Center) and Laura Swanson (Student Health & Counseling)

Description: This is an ongoing series to see how you, our faculty and staff colleagues, are doing this semester. We intend for these sessions to provide an opportunity for faculty and staff to connect, be seen and heard, feel less alone, feel valued, and know where you can go to get help if needed.

Previous discussion themes included challenges with finding space/time for self-care, maintaining morale, and building trust. Please consider coming to any of these gatherings to engage in authentic conversation with your peers. As Belonging is one of our college’s refreshed values, we hope these conversations lead to a culture where people feel respected and can ultimately create a network of support.

Zoom and Google Calendar Link

Thursday, December 9 What Does an Inclusive Teacher Look Like? A Panel Discussion, 11:00am - noon

Presenter:  Eileen MacAvery Kane, SUNY Rockland Community College, Stephanie Malmberg, SUNY Broome, Christopher Price, SUNY Center for Professional Development and David Wolf, SUNY Schenectady County Community College  

Description: Part of SUNY Center for Professional Development Week. A thriving, inclusive environment is a shared responsibility on campus, but what are instructors actually doing to make this a reality? There are many articles that underscore the need for a more inclusive learning environment, but what does that look like in practice? Join our panel of instructors from the SUNY Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion in Teaching and Learning Certificate Program to hear their strategies for making sure all students have an equitable chance at learning.

Bio:  Eileen MacAvery Kane has over 30 years' experience as an artist, graphic designer, and art educator. She received her MFA in Graphic Design from Savannah College of Art and Design. She is currently serving as Art Dept. Chair and Coordinator of the Graphic Design program at Rockland Community College where she teaches courses in Graphic Design, Typography, Digital Imaging and Digital Art. Her classes include COIL (Collaborative Online International Learning) projects and she and her students have collaborated with universities across the globe. She is a big proponent of Service Learning and projects in her classes often serve the local community. She has taught online for Berkeley College and the Art Institute of Pittsburgh. She is author and designer of the books East End Stories, Teacup Secrets, and Ethics: A Graphic Designer’s Field Guide, and the blogs ethicsingraphicdesign.org and chakraspirit.com. She is NYSCA grant recipient and Fulbright Scholar.

Bio:  Stephanie Malmberg is a Staff Associate and faculty member at SUNY Broome. As part of her current role as a professional development facilitator, she is collaborating on professional development opportunities for faculty and staff that are rooted in critical and culturally relevant and sustaining pedagogies. She is an adjunct lecturer in the Department of Human Development at Binghamton University and teaches courses that explore human rights issues in American and global education systems and human development across the lifespan, challenging historical, normative, and essentialized theories in favor of a more culturally informed and contextualized understanding. She is a Ph.D. candidate in the College of Community and Public Affairs at Binghamton University, and her research agenda is informed by issues of access and equity in higher education; her research seeks to bridge the gap between theory and practice in the creation of culturally relevant and sustaining pedagogical practices within community college classrooms.

Bio:  Christopher Price is the Academic Programs Manager for the State University of New York (SUNY) Center for Professional Development (CPD). At the CPD, Chris designs and implements professional development programs for faculty and staff both in and outside SUNY. He is an active member of the Professional and Organization Development (POD) Network serving as a member of the Core Committee in 2020-2022, Chair of the Professional Development Committee in 2018-19, and Chair of the 2017 Institute for New Faculty Developers. Prior to his position at the CPD, Chris was Director of the Center for Excellence in Learning and Teaching (CELT) at SUNY Brockport for 12 years. He started working at Brockport after receiving his PhD in Political Science from the University at Albany in 2004. Chris continues to teach online for Brockport as an instructor in the Master and Bachelor of Arts in Liberal Studies programs. He has been invited to give a keynote address or presentation over twenty times at conferences and campuses across the U.S. Teaching, learning, and educational development workshops and presentations Chris has conducted include discussion-based teaching, communicating effectively with students, collaborative learning, academic integrity, teaching with technology, course design and using critical reflection to improve teaching and learning. In 2013, he received the SUNY Chancellor’s Award for Excellence in Professional Service.

Bio:  David Wolf is currently the Teaching and Learning Specialist for Schenectady County Community College. In three years at the college he has developed faculty training courses in many modes of presentation, in instructional design, pedagogy, accessibility, and Universal Design for Learning. He has developed and oversees a voice-over internship for students that offers applied learning assignments that produce professional quality voice-over for instructional video that is available to the public. With over twenty years of higher education experience, and three years in the private sector, David has overseen the development of over 150 online courses with 53 of these offered in at least 11 different languages. His background in graphic art, animation, cognitive science, and education gives him a unique perspective on teaching and learning. An active researcher, David has several publications and presents locally and internationally, on topics such as Using Interactive Tools to Enhance Language Learning in an Online Environment; Engaging students in online courses through the use of mobile technology; and Assessing the Pedagogical Effectiveness and Student Preference of Publisher Digital Content Presentation in Online Literature and Writing Instruction.

Registration is FREE through the SUNY Center for Professional Development

Friday, December 10 WOW Your Audience: Presentation Best Practices, noon - 1:00 pm

Presenter:  Jamie Heron, SUNY Online Program Manager, SUNY Center for Professional Development  

Description: Part of SUNY Center for Professional Development Week. Are you struggling to simplify your slide deck? Do you feel that your presentation doesn't connect with the audience? Virtual presentations don't have to be long and boring! With a little help and reminders of how to best frame your story, you can breathe new life into your presentations and wow your peers. 

Bio:  Jamie Heron (she/hers) is the SUNY Online Program Manager at the SUNY Center for Professional Development. In her role as Program Manager, Jamie works to provide professional development programming for SUNY Online stakeholders, SUNY administration, and associated SUNY communities of practice. Prior to taking the position with the CPD, Jamie worked as an instructional designer and professional development coordinator at SUNY Broome Community College for nine years. In 2015 Jamie was awarded the SUNY Chancellor’s Award for Excellence in Professional Service. You can connect with Jamie on LinkedIn at https://www.linkedin.com/in/jamieheron/.

Registration is FREE through the SUNY Center for Professional Development

December 13-16 RISE Up Course: How Faculty Can Respond to the Challenges of Our Time

Who: Campus Compact of NY & PA is offering a FREE online workshop focused on helping faculty and staff create community engaged learning experiences around climate change and food insecurity with Middlebury College's Dr. Jon Isham.

Description: With our planet in crisis and communities being impacted by growing challenges, higher education is called to action to take the lead in addressing two of the world’s most pressing social issues: Climate Change and Food Insecurity. In service to the highest ideals of democracy, faculty are well positioned to help prepare students to address complex global problems. To help prepare faculty for this vital role, Campus Compact of NY & PA is offering a timely one-week virtual course with three live sessions stemming from Maine Campus Compact's Campuses for Environmental Stewardship (CES) program. This course will bring together faculty participants to consider ways to implement community-engaged teaching/learning while addressing many critical topics.

Click Here to Register

Please rsvp for any event by e-mailing tlc@geneseo.edu.

**Note: rsvp's are requested for attendance purposes only so we can ensure enough space and snacks for everyone (once we're able to provide snacks again). If you find that you are able to attend, but have not rsvp'd, you are more than welcome to do so.

Past and Completed Programs & Recordings

Fall Semester 2021

November 23, 2021 Taking the Temperature of Faculty and Staff: How Are You Doing?

Who: Dave Parfitt (Teaching & Learning Center) and Laura Swanson (Student Health & Counseling)

Description: This is an ongoing series to see how you, our faculty and staff colleagues, are doing this semester. We intend for these sessions to provide an opportunity for faculty and staff to connect, be seen and heard, feel less alone, feel valued, and know where you can go to get help if needed.

Previous discussion themes included challenges with finding space/time for self-care, maintaining morale, and building trust. Please consider coming to any of these gatherings to engage in authentic conversation with your peers. As Belonging is one of our college’s refreshed values, we hope these conversations lead to a culture where people feel respected and can ultimately create a network of support.

November 19, 2021 What Making Courses Accessible Means to Geneseo Students

Who: Dr. Amy Fisk, Assistant Dean for Accessibility, Kelleigh Larsson, Accessibility Coordinator, and Student Accessibility Advocates

Description: How can faculty and students place accessibility at the forefront at Geneseo? This workshop is designed to create a dialogue between the Office of Accessibility and faculty on how to make their courses and teaching dynamics accessible to students with disabilities. Student Accessibility Advocates will share their experiences and perspectives on how faculty can do their part in making our campus inclusive to all students.

November 18, 2021 Tangible Techniques for Time Management: Support Students through Overwhelm

Who: Leah Houk and Heather Wilhelm Routenberg, Dean of Academic Planning and Advising Office

Description: Have you ever been burdened by an overflowing to do list? Your coaching students and ASI mentees have too! In this workshop we’ll discuss active techniques students can apply to manage their time effectively in advance of final papers and exams. Join us for techniques to support your students at one of the most stressful times of the semester and perhaps you’ll apply some of these strategies to your own practice!

November 4, 2021 "I think I can, I think I can": Harnessing the Power of Growth Mindset

Who: Leah Houk and Heather Wilhelm Routenberg, Dean of Academic Planning and Advising Office

Description: Academic coaching brown bag series. DAPA's Academic Coaching Program is hosting a brown bag *virtual* luncheon series that explores student support, wellness, and academic success from a variety of vantage points. We encourage you to participate in as many sessions as you wish and to invite your colleagues along! These sessions are not restricted only to our coaching and ASI mentors and all are optional.
Bring your ideas, questions for conversation and of course... your lunch!

October 21, 2021 Understanding the Role of Implicit Bias and Stereotype Threat in Coaching & Mentoring Relationships

Who: robbie routenberg, Chief Diversity Officer 

Description: In this workshop we'll explore the role of implicit bias and stereotype threat on the coaching/mentoring relationship. These factors can disproportionately affect students from underrepresented backgrounds. The conversation will include strategies for how to reduce barriers to student success and wellbeing. Please come ready to engage, add your experiences and ask questions!

October 20, 2021 Undergraduate Research at Scale: What if the treatment is a CURE?

Who: Dr. Erin Dolan, University of Georgia

Description: National calls to improve undergraduate STEM education have emphasized the importance of undergraduate research experiences. Course-based Undergraduate Research Experiences, or CUREs, involve groups of students in addressing research problems or questions in the context of a class, and have been proposed as scalable ways of involving undergraduates in research. This seminar will offer a definition of CUREs, describe what makes them distinctive from other learning experiences, outline the state of knowledge about CURE effectiveness, and highlight results from the Freshman Research Initiative at the University of Texas at Austin as a unique and highly impactful CURE model.

Erin is a neuroscientist by training, teaches intro bio at UGA, and studies science research as a learning environment as a Georgia Athletic Association Professor for Innovative Science Education.

Click here for slides from this presentation

October 14, 2021 Holistic Wellness: Utilizing Campus Supports 

Who: Leah Houk and Heather Wilhelm Routenberg, Dean of Academic Planning and Advising Office

Description: Academic coaching brown bag series. DAPA's Academic Coaching Program is hosting a brown bag *virtual* luncheon series that explores student support, wellness, and academic success from a variety of vantage points. We encourage you to participate in as many sessions as you wish and to invite your colleagues along! These sessions are not restricted only to our coaching and ASI mentors and all are optional.
Bring your ideas, questions for conversation and of course... your lunch!

September 30, 2021 Metacognition: Strategies for Deeper Learning & Success

Who: Leah Houk and Heather Wilhelm Routenberg, Dean of Academic Planning and Advising Office

Description: Academic coaching brown bag series. DAPA's Academic Coaching Program is hosting a brown bag *virtual* luncheon series that explores student support, wellness, and academic success from a variety of vantage points. We encourage you to participate in as many sessions as you wish and to invite your colleagues along! These sessions are not restricted only to our coaching and ASI mentors and all are optional.
Bring your ideas, questions for conversation and of course... your lunch!

 September 29, 2021 Taking the Temperature of Faculty and Staff: How Are You Doing?

Who: Dave Parfitt (Teaching & Learning Center) and Laura Swanson (Student Health & Counseling)

Description: How are you, our faculty and staff colleagues, doing this semester? What are you seeing in and out of the classroom? While there have been efforts to help faculty and staff anticipate student needs, now that the semester is in full swing, we would like to explore how those needs are showing up in actuality, and how they are affecting you.

We invite you to participate in a TLC session designed to explore how you and your peers are doing in order to better understand your specific experiences. Please consider coming to one of these sessions to share, listen, and hopefully feel more connected to one another. We are offering two options for participation: in-person or Zoom, and we welcome you to select the option that you are most comfortable with. 

Both sessions will cover the same topics, including: current faculty/staff experiences, unexpected challenges and rewards, and options for faculty/staff support. Information gathered in these sessions will guide future programming, as this is the first TLC session in a series we are calling Teaching for Wellbeing. This series will feature wellbeing-promoting practices to help faculty and staff apply techniques that support wellbeing and learning both in and out of the classroom.

September 23, 2021 Supporting Student Autonomy: Fostering Self-Determination/Intrinsic Motivation

Who: Jennifer Katz, Ph.D, Professor, Psychology

Description: This workshop will describe theory and practice to support a student-centered approach to advising/coaching/mentorship. The educator-student relationship will be described as an opportunity to promote self-determination. In addition, relevant practices from motivational interviewing will be explored.

Background reading from "Think Again" by Adam Grant

Powerpoint slides from presentation

September 21, 2021 Enhancing the Student Experience

Who: Moderated by Beth McMurtrie - Senior Reporter The Chronicle of Higher Education; Jenae Cohn, Ph.D., Director of Academic Technology, Information Resources & Technology, California State University, Sacramento; Flower Darby, Co-author of "Small Teaching Online: Applying Learning Science in Online Classes"; Joshua R. Eyler, Ph.D., Director of Faculty Development, University of Mississippi; Mike Truong, Ph.D., Director of Digital Learning and Associate Professor, Azusa Pacific University

Description: After more than a year spent largely in virtual classrooms, learning remotely from home, students crave campus life and the rich academic experience that goes with it. What does that look like now? And what lessons have colleges learned about creating an effective learning experience in such an uncertain environment?

Chronicle of Higher Education Webinar Recording

August 26, 2021 Impact of Remote Learning on our Students with Disabilities

Who: Amy Fisk, Psy.D, Assistant Dean for Accessibility, SUNY Geneseo Office of Accessibility Services and Testing Center

Rebecca Mushtare, Assistant Professor, SUNY Oswego Art

Description: During this session Dr. Amy Fisk (Geneseo) and Rebecca Mushtare (Oswego) will share excerpts from interviews conducted with SUNY Oswego and SUNY Geneseo students with disabilities collected during 2020 about the impact remote and online learning has had on their academic experience. They will offer how a Universal Design for Learning (UDL) framework supports students generally, and students with disabilities specifically. Finally, recommendations on helpful UDL tools and teaching practices will be discussed.

Slides from Presentation

Resource Guide: Universal Design for Learning & Our Students

Spring Semester 2021

May 11, 2021 Reflection on Teaching: COVID19 and Beyond

Who: Dave Parfitt (Teaching and Learning Center)

Description: this workshop is designed to help individual faculty process both their impressions of what has happened since spring 2020 and how they feel about those events. The end goal is to encourage participants to begin to integrate their 2020-2021 teaching experiences into a longer and larger narrative arc of their careers and callings. 

May 7, 2021 Teach For Tomorrow

Who: YOU! We want you to be able to share the teaching you're excited about - and to be able to do so in an efficient way, for time is precious. Hence, "Teaching for Tomorrow," a new collaboration between TLC, CDL, and CIL: a monthly 60-minute get-together allowing anyone teaching a class at SUNY Geneseo to share via Zoom a specific approach, activity, practice, class element, or any other aspect of the way you teach.

Description: Each presentation will last 6 minutes, followed by 4 minutes of comments and questions. We’ll record, categorize, and archive presentations so those who can’t attend synchronously can benefit. These sessions and that archive will help us all quickly access new tips and tricks for our classes and identify ways we can collaborate on pedagogical projects.

May 7, 2021 Activism: A Roundtable on Teaching & Curriculum

Who: Dan DeZarn (Sustainability), Lytton Smith (ENGL), Alla Myzelev (ARTH), Amanda Roth (PHIL), Cathy Adams (HIST), Bruno Renero-Hannan (ANTH)

Description: An open discussion on the ways activism intersects with curriculum at SUNY Geneseo. We invite all to attend and participate, whether by sharing or listening. We will begin with these two questions and end with some ideas for action.

How do the principles and practices of activism enter into our classrooms and our teaching? What opportunities do we imagine for helping students learn through activist work in future?

 

This event is part of the TLC/CIL's new "Roundtables on Teaching and Curriculum" series which aims to help share what we're doing in our classrooms and academic programs and collaborate to build from that.

April 29, 2021 Recognizing and Connecting with Students in Distress

Facilitators: Dave Parfitt (Teaching and Learning Center) and Emma Wolford (Health and Counseling)

Description: In this period of increased stress and trauma, how do we ensure our students are learning? How do we balance and promote our own mental health and well being? How do we support positive mental health and well being for our students?

Now more than ever, faculty are one of the main (and perhaps, sometimes, only) touch points for our students, and teaching & supporting them in a remote environment presents additional challenges. Are you worried about a student? Members of faculty and staff at SUNY Geneseo are in an ideal position to recognize when students are struggling emotionally and may need help. However, sometimes it's hard to know what to do when faced with a tough situation.

Kognito At-Risk for Faculty & Staff is an online simulation that lets you practice conversations with virtual students so you'll know what to say in real life. The simulation has been designed to help you learn to notice signs of distress, use techniques to discuss your concerns, and refer students to appropriate resources when necessary.

Over 90% of users say they would recommend the Kognito simulation to their peers. Kognito is also listed in the Suicide Prevention Resource Center's Best Practices Registry.

April 16, 2021 More than 'Standard' English: A Roundtable on Teaching and Curriculum

Who: Sasha Allgayer (COMN), Gillian Paku (ENGL), Jennifer Guzman (ANTH), Katherine Menec (SoE), Lytton Smith (ENGL), Sasha Eloi-Evans (Multicultural Programs), Atsushi Tajima (COMN)

Description: An open discussion about getting beyond "standard" English as we explore two questions: 

  • How do we or can we affirm and integrate linguistic varieties in writing-intensive contexts? 
  • How can we work towards, and how are we already working towards, processes of grading and assessment writing that are anti-racist?

Faculty, staff, and students including Sasha Allgayer, Sasha Eloi-Evans, Jennifer Guzmán, Gillian Paku, Katherine Menec, Sydney Schmidt, and Atsushi Tajima will share brief prepared remarks before a discussion open to all to join. 

This event is part of the TLC/CIL's new "Roundtables on Teaching and Curriculum" series which aims to help share what we're doing in our classrooms and academic programs and collaborate to build from that.

April 9, 2021 Recognizing and Connecting with Students in Distress

Facilitators: Dave Parfitt (Teaching and Learning Center) and Beth Cholette (Health and Counseling)

Description: In this period of increased stress and trauma, how do we ensure our students are learning? How do we balance and promote our own mental health and well being? How do we support positive mental health and well being for our students?

Now more than ever, faculty are one of the main (and perhaps, sometimes, only) touch points for our students, and teaching & supporting them in a remote environment presents additional challenges. Are you worried about a student? Members of faculty and staff at SUNY Geneseo are in an ideal position to recognize when students are struggling emotionally and may need help. However, sometimes it's hard to know what to do when faced with a tough situation.

Kognito At-Risk for Faculty & Staff is an online simulation that lets you practice conversations with virtual students so you'll know what to say in real life. The simulation has been designed to help you learn to notice signs of distress, use techniques to discuss your concerns, and refer students to appropriate resources when necessary.

Over 90% of users say they would recommend the Kognito simulation to their peers. Kognito is also listed in the Suicide Prevention Resource Center's Best Practices Registry.

April 9, 2021 SUNY Virtual Diversity Equity and Inclusion Discussion Forum

All SUNY staff (especially those who interact often with students) and faculty are invited to participate in the "SUNY Virtual Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Discussion Forum.”
The goal of the program is give SUNY staff an opportunity to discuss diversity, equity, and inclusion issues in higher education in a supportive environment to help them create the inclusive mindset they need to learn the competencies necessary to serve a diverse population of students and others on their campus.

The program features a mix of asynchronous (not in real time) online discussions in Workplace as well as meetings in Zoom. If you have any questions, contact Chris Price, Academic Programs Manager, SUNY Center for Professional Development (chris.price@suny.edu).

March 29, 2021 Q&A on Common Accommodations

Who: Dr. Amy Fisk, Assistant Dean for Accessibility
Annika Mounts, Student Accessibility Advocate
Kelleigh Larsson, Office of Accessibility Services Intern

Description: This webinar will provide an overview of common accommodations approved for students connected with the Office of Accessibility Services, including, but not limited to, Extended Time on Assessments, Audio Recording, Captioning/Transcripts, and Modified Attendance/Flexible Due Dates. Participants will learn more about Universal Design tools and strategies that can help reduce the need to provide individual accommodations. The webinar will include opportunities for Q&A throughout.

March 26, 2021 Leveraging the Neuroscience of Now: Toward Healing & Recovery

Who Mays Imad, Ph.D, Professor - Department of Life and Physical Science, Coordinator - The Teaching and Learning Center, Pima Community College

On March 26 of last year, I held the first of a series of webinars on trauma-informed teaching & learning. I invited the teaching and learning community to join me so we may begin to process the abrupt disruption and uncertainties … and the trauma. As the world continues to grapple with the COVID-19 pandemic, I continued to reflect on the question: What critical opportunity does this story of tragic suffering and loss present me as an educator?  

On Friday, March 26, I will hold a free webinar for educators and to discuss how we may leverage the neuroscience of now to move toward healing & recovery. You are cordially invited to join me and the teaching & learning community to reflect together and interrogate our collective relationship with hope. 

March 26, 2021 Engaging Remote Students - Matthea Marquart, Columbia [via SUNY CPD]

Description: How do you know whether your students are engaged in learning during your synchronous online classes? Can you tell from their cameras? When your students leave their cameras off, does this make it difficult to feel connected to them? Do you wonder why your students leave their cameras off? In this workshop, we’ll examine why students may be unwilling or unable to use a web camera during your classes and discuss alternative ways of maintaining active engagement with your students.

Matthea Marquart is the Assistant Dean of Online Education and an adjunct Lecturer at Columbia University’s School of Social Work (CSSW). She has worked with CSSW’s Online Campus since 2014, including creating CSSW’s award-winning 5-week Institute on Pedagogy and Technology for Online Courses, and she has worked in online training and education since 2008. Matthea is passionate about examining and discussing the ins and outs of effective online education. She has collaborated on publishing 20+ related articles and presenting 100+ related sessions, including focusing on webcam use in a recent article for

EDUCAUSEand a recent roundtable for the Teacher’s College Winter Roundtable. She welcomes connections via LinkedInor Twitter @MattheaMarquart, and links to her past publications and presentation materials can be found on her website.

For more information, go to Engaging Remote Students.

March 24, 2021 STOP and SLOW DOWN: Rejuvenate with Everyday Mindfulness

Title: STOP and SLOW DOWN: Rejuvenate with Everyday Mindfulness

Who: Beth Cholette, PhD, RYT (she/her/hers) Assistant Director of Counseling Services

Description: This program will focus on finding ways to slow down in the midst of our fast-paced everyday lives. Through use of simple mindfulness skills, Beth will teach ways to interrupt our auto-pilot response. This experiential program will incorporate short, skills-based practices plus an optional longer (approximately 10 muided

March 24, 2021 Dr. Rae André "Teaching Climate Leadership"

Dr. Rae André will facilitate a virtual faculty-development session on "Teaching Climate Leadership." The workshop will equip instructors to promote integrative learning in courses on strong sustainability.

Dr. Rae André is the author of Lead for the Planet: Five Practices for Confronting Climate Change. Lead for the Planet shifts the focus to how we, the members of Team Humanity, are going to organize to solve the twin issues of climate change and energy evolution. The book channels a broad range of social science perspectives, from anthropology to psychology to economics, to help decision-makers explore how Team Humanity can get this thing done.

An organizational psychologist, André is professor emeritus of leadership and sustainability and instructor in the D'Amore-McKim School of Business at Northeastern University in Boston. Her courses promote systemic thinking on climate change and energy evolution. Aimed at high level undergraduates, MBAs, and professionals, they include sustainability for organizations ("weak" sustainability) along with sustainability for the planet ("strong" sustainability). Her work has reached students in a variety of disciplines from management to engineering to liberal arts. André received a Ph.D. in organizational psychology from the University of Michigan, an M.A. in film studies from the University of California at Los Angeles, and a B.A. (cum laude) in English from Cornell University. 

March 23, 2021 Dr. Rae André "Lead for the Planet: Five Practices for Confronting Climate Change" (COPLAC), 

Description

Georgia College, in partnership with the Council of Public Liberal Arts Colleges (COPLAC) and the Management & Organizational Behavior Teaching Society (MOBTS), will host a national forum with Dr. Rae André, professor emeritus at Northeastern University’s D’Amore-McKim School of Business. 

André will present and facilitate a public forum on Tuesday, March 23rd from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. Part of Georgia College’s Inspire! series on leadership, André will lead a discussion on sustainability leadership. “Growth is finite, natural capital is priceless, and human progress must be measured in terms of both economics and the quality of life,” says André. The forum will be hosted virtually and will be open to the public. 

Dr. Rae André is the author of Lead for the Planet: Five Practices for Confronting Climate Change. Lead for the Planet shifts the focus to how we, the members of Team Humanity, are going to organize to solve the twin issues of climate change and energy evolution. The book channels a broad range of social science perspectives, from anthropology to psychology to economics, to help decision-makers explore how Team Humanity can get this thing done.

An organizational psychologist, André is professor emeritus of leadership and sustainability and instructor in the D'Amore-McKim School of Business at Northeastern University in Boston. Her courses promote systemic thinking on climate change and energy evolution. Aimed at high level undergraduates, MBAs, and professionals, they include sustainability for organizations ("weak" sustainability) along with sustainability for the planet ("strong" sustainability). Her work has reached students in a variety of disciplines from management to engineering to liberal arts. André received a Ph.D. in organizational psychology from the University of Michigan, an M.A. in film studies from the University of California at Los Angeles, and a B.A. (cum laude) in English from Cornell University. 

March 22, 2021 Building (and Keeping) Teams and Communities in our Departments

Who: Corey Ha, Director of Milne Library 

Kurt Fletcher, Distinguished Teaching Professor, Physics & Astronomy 

Laurie Fox, Director of Educational Technology

Description: Last fall, the TLC held a session with UUP Professionals where much discussion centered on how to build teams and communities within our departments (especially as we work remotely). This informal panel discussion will share ideas/strategies from three different departments. We encourage people to attend, participate, and add to the conversation so we can all learn from each other.

March 18, 2021 A Conversation on Student Workload in Online Courses

The Center for Digital Learning in partnership with the Student Association discussed the perceptions, expectations, and challenges surrounding student workload in online courses at Geneseo. A summary of the program can be found on the CDL Blog.

March 3, 2021 Leveraging Your Institutional Repository for Open Education

SUNY Geneseo's institutional repository, KnightScholar (https://knightscholar.geneseo.edu), highlights scholarship and creative works from the Geneseo community. Since 2018, we have added works across several SUNY Geneseo academic departments, and of several different types. Most of the material in KnightScholar are results of research or creative endeavors, though we also include educational materials that are freely available to the public.
In this workshop, we will discuss some of the steps for creating open lesson plans and sustaining open access by depositing those plans into KnightScholar.

March 4, 2021 Introduction to Pressbooks for Publishing OER

Title: Introduction to Pressbooks for Publishing OER

Presented by Allison Brown, Digital Publishing Services Manager

Description: Are you interested in creating or editing an OER but don't know where to start? Milne Publishing offers the Geneseo community access to Pressbooks, an online book production software. Come get an overview of the tools available to you and see examples of how others have used it. This virtual workshop is being offered in support of Open Education Week.

March 9, 2021 Mindful Multiple Choice - Self-Care Strategies for Faculty

Title: Mindful Multiple Choice - Self-Care Strategies for Faculty

Who: Beth Cholette, PhD, RYT (she/her/hers) Assistant Director of Counseling Services

Description: This program will focus on finding ways to be mindful in the midst of a pandemic. Beth will teach simple strategies that can be incorporated into daily life. There will be short practices throughout the program plus an optional longer (approximately 10 minute) guided visualization at the end.

Beth Cholette is a clinical psychologist and certified yoga instructor who teaches yoga and mindfulness-based meditation on campus and in the community. Beth is able to adapt yoga/meditation for classroom settings, and she is happy to work with faculty/staff to create specific sessions to meet pedagogical needs.

February 2021 Black History Month Event Series

Throughout the month of February we have scheduled a series of Black History Month events in support of our ongoing effort to become an antiracist college. Details, dates, and recordings can all be found on this separate dedicated webpage.

January 25 & 26, 2021 ASSESStivus

Schedule and recordings from virtual ASSESStivus presentations held at the end of January 2021. Keynote address: "Telling Our Stories in a Post-Covid World" by Dr. Kevin Gannon, Director of the Center for Excellence in Teaching and Learning and Professor of History at Grand View University in Des Moines, Iowa. author of Radical Hope.

Fall Semester 2020

December 11, 2020 Teaching for Tomorrow

Title: Teaching for Tomorrow

Who: YOU! We want you to be able to share the teaching you're excited about - and to be able to do so in an efficient way, for time is precious. Hence, "Teaching for Tomorrow," a new collaboration between TLC, CDL, and CIL: a monthly 60-minute get-together allowing anyone teaching a class at SUNY Geneseo to share via Zoom a specific approach, activity, practice, class element, or any other aspect of the way you teach.

Description: Each presentation will last 6 minutes, followed by 4 minutes of comments and questions. We’ll record, categorize, and archive presentations so those who can’t attend synchronously can benefit. These sessions and that archive will help us all quickly access new tips and tricks for our classes and identify ways we can collaborate on pedagogical projects.

Please submit via this Google Form.

Presentations can be on any topic and in any subject area. Given the current priorities of the college, we particularly welcome presentations that: showcase online learning and/or virtual alternatives to in-person activities; engage students as researchers; demonstrate anti-racist teaching practices; and/or enable partnerships with community organizations. This list is not meant to be definitive; we encourage any teaching-related activity you are excited about sharing.

December 8, 2020 Self-Care Strategies for Faculty

Title: Mindful Multiple Choice - Self-Care Strategies for Faculty

Who: Beth Cholette, PhD, RYT (she/her/hers) Assistant Director of Counseling Services

Description: This program will focus on finding ways to be mindful in the midst of a pandemic. Beth will teach simple strategies that can be incorporated into daily life. There will be short practices throughout the program plus an optional longer (approximately 10 minute) guided visualization at the end.

Beth Cholette is a clinical psychologist and certified yoga instructor who teaches yoga and mindfulness-based meditation on campus and in the community. Beth is able to adapt yoga/meditation for classroom settings, and she is happy to work with faculty/staff to create specific sessions to meet pedagogical needs.

December 4, 2020 Using Online Teaching for Online Learning

Title: Using Online Teaching for Online Learning

Who: Bob Boyd, School of Business

Description: In this presentation, School of Business faculty member Bob Boyd will use his many years of experience with online classes to discuss the importance of approaching teaching online from the perspective of how learning happens in an online space. He'll share some concrete examples of effective online learning that others can adopt and adapt. Participants will also have a chance to ask questions and share their own effective practices.

December 3, 2020 Academic Coaches Learning Community

Title: Academic Coaches Learning Community, Session 4

Who: Heather Wilhelm Routenberg (Academic Planning and Advising) and Dave Parfitt (Teaching and Learning Center)

Description: This Academic Coaching Learning Community is a series of professional development sessions held on the first Thursday of the month to assist you in serving your advisees as well as the broader student community. This time will offer the opportunity to explore concrete activities and strategies you can apply with your advisees to foster their growth.

November 19, 2020 Teaching for Tomorrow

Title: Teaching for Tomorrow

Who: YOU! We want you to be able to share the teaching you're excited about - and to be able to do so in an efficient way, for time is precious. Hence, "Teaching for Tomorrow," a new collaboration between TLC, CDL, and CIL: a monthly 60-minute get-together allowing anyone teaching a class at SUNY Geneseo to share via Zoom a specific approach, activity, practice, class element, or any other aspect of the way you teach.

Description: Each presentation will last 6 minutes, followed by 4 minutes of comments and questions. We’ll record, categorize, and archive presentations so those who can’t attend synchronously can benefit. These sessions and that archive will help us all quickly access new tips and tricks for our classes and identify ways we can collaborate on pedagogical projects.

Please submit via this Google Form.

Presentations can be on any topic and in any subject area. Given the current priorities of the college, we particularly welcome presentations that: showcase online learning and/or virtual alternatives to in-person activities; engage students as researchers; demonstrate anti-racist teaching practices; and/or enable partnerships with community organizations. This list is not meant to be definitive; we encourage any teaching-related activity you are excited about sharing.

November 18, 2020 ACCC Lite: Power, Privilege, and Systemic Racism

Title: ACCC Lite - Power, Privilege, and Systemic Racism

Who: Sarah Frank (Residence Life), Monica Schneider (Psychology), and Dave Parfitt (Teaching and Learning Center)

Description: An introduction to some of the concepts covered in the Advancing Cultural Competency Program (ACCC).

November 16, 2020 Inquiry Journals

Title: Inquiry Journals Who: Claire Gravelin, Tina Merrilees, and Brad Taber-Thomas (Psychology)

Description: Join three Psychology faculty members as they discuss their innovative reflective "Inquiry Journal" assignment, which provides students the opportunity to make connections and meaning across multiple courses during these challenging times. Hear about the work students have produced in this pilot semester and learn how you can adopt the assignment in your course.

November 16, 2020 Faculty Well-Being and Career Paths

Title: Faculty Well-Being and Career Paths: What Campus Leaders Need to Know

Who: Hosted by Liz McMillen, Executive Editor, The Chronicle of Higher Education and Panelists Include
- Sian Beilock, President, Barnard College
- Jonathan Holloway, President, Rutgers University
- Kiernan Mathews, Executive Director of the Collaborative on Academic Careers in Higher Education, Harvard's Graduate School of Education.
- Katherine Rowe, President, William & Mary

Description: Faculty are stressed out, overworked, and fatigued. A Chronicle survey of more than 1,000 professors and instructors nationwide found a struggling group, with 70 percent of tenured faculty saying their work-life balance has deteriorated in 2020, and 86 percent of female tenured professors saying that their workload has increased. What can college leaders do to support them?

In a virtual forum hosted by Liz McMillen, executive editor at The Chronicle, we will gather a panel of higher-ed leaders to explore the challenges and opportunities of helping faculty in their jobs and lives. The session will share results from the exclusive survey and offer ideas for what faculty are looking for.

Watch recording of panel here

November 10, 2020 ACCC Lite: Implicit Bias and Microaggressions

Title: ACCC Lite - Implicit Bias and Microaggressions

Who: Mallory Giambra (CAS), Megan Kennerknecht (Financial Aid), and Dave Parfitt (Teaching and Learning Center)

Description: An introduction to some of the core concepts covered in the Advancing Cultural Competency Program (ACCC).

November 9-13, 2020 National Distance Learning Week (NDLW) 

Title:  SUNY Online Celebrates National Distance Learning Week

Who: SUNY Online Team

Description: SUNY Online is pleased to host and showcase the following presentations in celebration of National Distance Learning Week (NDLW) 2020. For detailed descriptions on each webinar and access/recording links, visit the SUNY Online Teaching Hub. Registration is not required for these free webinars. Webinar slides and recordings will be listed below each session.

November 5, 2020 Academic Coaches Learning Community

Title: Academic Coaches Learning Community, Support Services for Your Students

Who: Emma Wolford (Director of Counseling Services), Marcus Foster (Title IX Coordinator), Sarah Covell (Alcohol and Other Drugs Coordinator), Heather Wilhelm Routenberg (Academic Planning and Advising) and Dave Parfitt (Teaching and Learning Center)

Description: Please join us for November's professional development session focused on campus support services available to assist your students with managing emotional wellness and healthy habits outside of the classroom. Together we'll discuss what techniques you can use to support your students in navigating challenging issues, how to spot distress or concerning behavior, and how to make appropriate referrals.

November 5, 2020 Inclusive by Design: Universal Design for Learning and the World Language Classroom,

Title: Inclusive by Design: Universal Design for Learning and the World Language Classroom

Description: Universal Design for Learning (UDL) is a research-based framework for designing instruction to be more accessible to all learners. By following the principles and guidelines of the UDL framework, instructors can design a more inclusive learning environment that will provide an improved experience for all students.

This talk will provide both a theoretical introduction to the UDL framework and practical suggestions for applying it to the language classroom. First, a brief introduction to UDL and information on learner variability (i.e., the diversity in how everyone learns) will be provided. Next, results of research that has investigated the effects of an annual UDL training for faculty, staff, and administrators will be briefly shared. Finally, the main focus of the presentation will be on specific strategies that faculty can employ as they seek to universally design their language instruction. Given the current global health crisis and the importance of including all learners when teaching a language at a distance, specific strategies for synchronous and asynchronous online language instruction will be provided.

November 2, 2020 Election Anxiety Panel Discussion

Title: 2020 Election Anxiety Panel Discussion

Who: Wes Kennison (English), Jeff Koch (Political Science and International Relations), Nick Palumbo (Leadership & Service), Chris Prusak (University Police Department), robbie routenberg (Chief Diversity Officer), and Emma Wolford (Counseling Services)

Description: Regardless of political affiliation, over 2/3 of American adults indicate the 2020 Presidential Election is a significant source of stress and anxiety according to a recent survey from the American Psychological Association.  In this panel discussion, SUNY Geneseo faculty and staff will offer tips and resources for how to cope with 2020 election anxiety as well as how to help our students manage stress related to the election.

October 26, 2020 What is Antiracist Pedagogy? (recording and materials)

Title: What is Antiracist Pedagogy?

Who: Crystal Simmons (School of Education) and Dave Parfitt (Teaching and Learning Center)

Description: This session led by Dr. Crystal Simmons, an Assistant Professor in the School of Education, will discuss the importance and need for Antiracist pedagogy. She will present strategies and resources that can be incorporated in our coursework and teaching.  Questions that will be addressed during the presentation include:

  • What is Antiracist Pedagogy?
  • How can I implement this in my coursework?
  • What does it mean to be an antiracist educator?

Links:

Background reading: Alda Blakeney (2011) Antiracist Pedagogy: Definition, Theory, and Professional Development

Presentation Slides

Links to Additional Resources

Antiracist Discussion Pedagogy

Webinar Video Recording

Audio Only Recording

Chat Transcript

October 21, 2020 A Community Conversation with Dr. Ibram X. Kendi

Title: A Community Conversation with Dr. Ibram X. Kendi

Who: Dr. Ibram X. Kendi is one of the country's leading antiracist voices. He is the Andrew W. Mellon Professor in the Humanities at Boston University, a #1 New York Times best-selling author, and the youngest-ever winner of the National Book Award for Nonfiction. He is also a 2020–2021 Frances B. Cashin Fellow at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard University, where he will continue work on his next historical monograph, Bones of Inequity: A Narrative History of Racist Policies in America.

Description: The Friends of the Central Library, in partnership with the Syracuse University Office of Diversity and Inclusion, Hendricks Chapel, and the Lender Center for Social Justice, present A Community Conversation with Dr. Ibram X. Kendi, sponsored by The Central New York Community Foundation, The Gifford Foundation, and WCNY. Join us for a free discussion on Zoom about antiracism and critical social issues that affect us all. In the coming weeks, you will receive an email with instructions and a link to the Zoom webinar for the event.

Kendi's 2019 book How to be an Antiracist was described by the New York Times as “the most courageous book to date on the problem of race in the Western mind.” His latest book published October 6, 2020, Be Antiracist: A Guided Journal for Awareness, Reflection, and Action, is available now.

October 19 - 23, 2020 SUNY Faculty Development Virtual Conference

Title:  SUNY Faculty Development Virtual Conference - Teaching & Learning for Student Success

Who: The SUNY Faculty Development Conference is sponsored by the SUNY Faculty Development Community of Practice which brings together educational professional development staff and faculty throughout SUNY, with a particular emphasis on teaching and learning. This group creates opportunities for staff and faculty to learn about available SUNY resources to support teaching and learning and strengthen our professional networks. The audience for the conference includes those working in faculty development roles as well as faculty.

Description: "Teaching and Learning for Student Success” defined broadly to include:

Achieving course and program learning outcomes Engaging in curricular and co-curricular activities Student access, retention, and completion strategies Using technology in both face-to-face and online courses to improve learning

Sessions will focus on professional development programs implemented on campuses, teaching and learning strategies, or research in one of these areas. These engaging sessions will address ways we can meet the needs of all students, staff, and faculty and thereby strengthen our institutions and communities.

Register for this FREE Virtual Conference

  • Supporting, learning from, and including diverse populations on our campuses. Diverse populations include but are not limited to nontraditional and first-generation students, students with disabilities, students of color, students from underrepresented groups, international students, LGBTQ+ students, religion, socioeconomic status, and gender.
  • Implementing innovative pedagogical strategies to move beyond remediation and help students overcome bottlenecks or threshold concepts in their coursework
October 16, 2020 Information Session: Creating a Microcredential (materials)

Title: Information Session: Creating a Microcredential

Who: Center for Integrative Learning, Teaching Learning Center, and the Associate Provost for Curriculum and Assessment

Description: An information session to help faculty interested in developing Microcredentials, which comprise a minimum of 6 and a maximum of 12 credits of academic course work with at least one high impact/applied learning/integrative learning experience and a culminating experience with a self-reflective component.

Whether you're entirely new to Microcredentials or are already working on plans. The session will cover:

  • the criteria for Microcredentials as passed by College Senate
  • the process and timeline for submitting Microcredentials
  • examples of potential Microcredentials (those already engaged in creating something are invited to share and discuss ideas)
  • chances to discuss how microcredentials might enhance existing teaching, research, and student learning 

For those who cannot make the session, we will be holding future events on Microcredentials and we are also happy to conduct 1:1 consultations - please contact us if you'd like to talk further.

Slides from the presentation

October 15, 2020 Science, Race, and Power

Title: Science, Race and Power

Who: Angela Saini, an award-winning science journalist whose print and broadcast work has appeared on the BBC and in the GuardianNew ScientistWired, the Economist, and Science. A former Knight Science Journalism Fellow at MIT, she won the American Association for the Advancement of Science’s Kavli Science Journalism gold award in 2015. Saini has a master’s in engineering from Oxford University, and she is the author of Inferior: How Science Got Women Wrong and the New Research That’s Rewriting the Story and Geek Nation: How Indian Science Is Taking Over the World.

Description: Racial categories feel tangible, but as we know from genetics, they are no more rooted in biology than they were hundreds of years ago when they were arbitrarily invented by European scientists who were affected by the politics of their time. Yet scientific myths about human difference live on today in disturbing ways. As ethnic nationalism rises around the world, race science is experiencing a revival on the far-right, fuelled by the abuse of data and facts by politically-motivated groups. Even well-intentioned scientists, through their lazy use of old-fashioned categories, inappropriately imply that race has some innate basis. We forget to our cost that race was never about biology but always about power.

October 14, 2020 TLC Conversation: Building Our Community, Supporting Each Other

Title: Building Our Community, Supporting Each Other

Who: Facilitated by Dave Parfitt (Teaching and Learning Center)

Description: An open discussion with SUNY Geneseo faculty and staff to share your classroom successes and challenges in this semester as well as community brainstorming for ways to support each other. This is a chance to connect with your Geneseo colleagues and engage in a conversation on effective teaching practices, work/life balance, and addressing the wants and needs of our community.

October 13, 2020 Reading Group Robin DiAngelo's "White Fragility" #2

Title: Virtual Reading Group Robin DiAngelo's "White Fragility" #2

Who: Laura Matthews (Director of Jewish Student Life), Sasha Eloi-Evans (Director of Multicultural Programs and Services), and Dave Parfitt (Teaching and Learning Center)

Description: After our first discussion of Robin DiAngelo's "White Fragility," there was a great desire by those in attendance to continue the conversation. Therefore, we have scheduled a second discussion on Tuesday, October 13 from 10:30-11:30am via Zoom. Link to join can be found below. No matter how far you got in DiAngelo's book, or whether you were able to join our first session, all are welcome to join the discussion. We plan on gathering the entire group in a Zoom room for an opening discussion, and then dividing into breakout rooms for smaller group discussions. Based on initial feedback from when the books were distributed, we want to ensure everyone has the space they need for a fruitful discussion. Therefore, we will have breakout rooms solely for our BIPOC and White colleagues as well as breakout rooms for those comfortable in engaging in the discussions together. This session is part of our continuing "Becoming and Antiracist Campus" project.

October 9, 2020 Preparing an Inclusive Online Course (recording)

Title: Preparing an Inclusive Online Course

Who: ACUE (Association of College and University Educators)

Description: The American Association of State Colleges and Universities (AASCU), American Council on Education (ACE), The Association of Public and Land-Grant Universities (APLU), The Council of Independent Colleges (CIC), The National Association of System Heads (NASH), Every Learner Everywhere, Strong Start to Finish and The Association of College and University Educators (ACUE) invite leaders, faculty and staff across higher education for focused and practical discussion on: Preparing an Inclusive Online Course. Panelists will share their thoughts and practices for approaching your online teaching with an inclusive mindset, ensuring your course reflects a diverse society and world. Learn inclusive strategies you can put into practice even before the first day of your online course to set the stage for creating a more equitable online learning environment. Moderated by Kevin Kelly, ACUE Academic Director, this panel will feature a brief keynote from Farrah Ward, Provost and Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs at Elizabeth City State University.

Links:

Webinar Video Recording

Transcript: Creating an Online Learning Environment

Chat Transcript

October 5, 2020 Supporting Faculty and Staff Mental Health (recording)

Title: Supporting Faculty and Staff Mental Health

Who: The Chronicle of Higher Education - Sian Beilock President @Barnard College, Shawnté Elbert Associate Dean of Health & Wellness @Central Washington University, Anthony Ocampo Faculty Coach @National Center for Faculty Development and Diversity

Description: COVID-19 and social unrest have placed a strain on the mental well-being of people everywhere. While there has been considerable concern for students, college leaders are also focusing on the well-being of faculty and staff on their campuses. How can college leaders support them and provide access to the tools and resources necessary for them to care for their own mental health?

Join The Chronicle for a virtual forum that examines the policies and plans that college leaders and senior administrators can put in place to ease the mental strain of this unprecedented semester.

  • How do they prevent potential burnout or the isolation of working and teaching remotely?
  • How do they best serve staff and faculty of color who are affected by the dual crises of Covid-19 and systematic racism?
  • How do they ensure that staff are treating each other with compassion and care when everyone feels on edge?

Find out as campus leaders, faculty, and mental-health experts bring their varying perspectives to the table for a frank and enlightening discussion.

The archived version is available here.

October 2, 2020 Creating an Inclusive Online Learning Environment (recording)

Title: Creating an Inclusive Online Learning Environment

Who: ACUE (Association of College and University Educators)

Description: The American Association of State Colleges and Universities (AASCU), American Council on Education (ACE), The Association of Public and Land-Grant Universities (APLU), The Council of Independent Colleges (CIC), The National Association of System Heads (NASH), Every Learner Everywhere, Strong Start to Finish and The Association of College and University Educators (ACUE) invite leaders, faculty and staff across higher education for a focused and practical discussion on: Creating an Inclusive Online Learning Environment Panelists will share practices they have found helpful to effectively set expectations for valuing diverse viewpoints, facilitating respectful conversations, and engaging students in inclusive active learning exercises. The teaching practices discussed in this webinar can be utilized in a variety of disciplines and course sizes to promote equity and inclusion. Moderated by Charity Peak, Regional Director of Academic Programs at ACUE, this panel will feature a brief keynote from Michael Benitez Jr., Vice President for the Office of Diversity and Inclusion at Metropolitan State University, Denver.

Links:

Webinar Recap

Webinar Video Recording

Transcript: Creating an Online Learning Environment

October 1, 2020 Academic Coaches Learning Community

Title: Academic Coaches Learning Community, Session 2

Who: Heather Wilhelm Routenberg (Academic Planning and Advising) and Dave Parfitt (Teaching and Learning Center)

Description: This Academic Coaching Learning Community is a series of professional development sessions held on the first Thursday of the month to assist you in serving your advisees as well as the broader student community. This time will offer the opportunity to explore concrete activities and strategies you can apply with your advisees to foster their growth.

September 17, 2020 Race, Class, and Academic Life (recording)

Title: Race, Class, and Academic Life 

Who: The Chronicle of Higher Education - panel, led by co-hosts Michael Sorrell, president of Paul Quinn College, and Sarah Brown, Chronicle senior reporter, included:

  • Fred A. Bonner II, professor of educational leadership and counseling at Prairie View A&M University
  • Marcia Chatelain, professor of history and African American studies at Georgetown University 
  • Darrick Hamilton, professor of economics and urban policy and director of the Institute for the Study of Race, Stratification, and Political Economy at The New School
  • Tracey E. Hucks, provost and dean of the faculty at Colgate University
  • Randall Kennedy, professor of law at Harvard Law School

Description: What does the national reckoning over systemic racism mean for academic life? Some faculty members have called for specific, immediate actions from their institutions. Scholars across the country have shared personal experiences with the hashtag #Blackintheivory, raising consciousness among colleagues. And college leaders are talking more about diversity, equity, and inclusion. What do Black academics believe needs to change — and how?

The archived version is available here.

September 16, 2020 Reading Group Robin DiAngelo's "White Fragility" 

Title: Virtual Reading Group Robin DiAngelo's "White Fragility"

Who: Laura Matthews (Director of Jewish Student Life), Sasha Eloi-Evans (Director of Multicultural Programs and Services), Jennifer Guzman (Assistant Professor Anthropology), and Dave Parfitt (Teaching and Learning Center)

Description: Join a facilitated discussion of Robin DiAngelo's "White Fragility." We plan on gathering the entire group in a Zoom room for an opening discussion, and then dividing into breakout rooms for smaller group discussions. Based on initial feedback from when the books were distributed, we want to ensure everyone has the space they need for a fruitful discussion. Therefore, we will have breakout rooms solely for our BIPOC and White colleagues as well as breakout rooms for those comfortable in engaging in the discussions together. This session is part of our continuing "Becoming and Antiracist Campus" project.

September 10, 2020 Academic Coaches Learning Community

Title: Academic Coaches Learning Community, Session 1

Who: Heather Wilhelm Routenberg (Academic Planning and Advising) and Dave Parfitt (Teaching and Learning Center)

Description: This Academic Coaching Learning Community is a series of professional development sessions held on the first Thursday of the month to assist you in serving your advisees as well as the broader student community. This time will offer the opportunity to explore concrete activities and strategies you can apply with your advisees to foster their growth. This initial meeting will engage new coaches in a review of the academic recovery contract and expectations for student participants, a discussion about our program’s philosophy and approach, and a broad review of resources grounded in promising metacognitive strategies for academic growth and development. If you are new to the program, we hope that you’ll be able to join us for this event. Further details are forthcoming. 

September 2, 2020 The Shift from Grading to Ungrading (recording)

Title: The Shift from Grading to Ungrading

Who: Michael Leroy Obery, Distinguished Professor, History

Description: A growing number of American college professors are changing the way they grade students. Some are engaging an evaluation method referred to as "ungrading." Last Fall semester, Michael Oberg decided to stop scoring papers, opting instead to write lengthy comments and meet individually with students. During Finals Week, students handed in their final work, and told him what they thought they deserved as their grade. Michael Oberg will share what he learned during this experiment with "ungrading," and discuss changing the faculty/student power dynamic and ineffective grading methods.

To prepare for this session, please read Michael Oberg's short blog posts On Student Retention and My Experiment with Ungrading. In addition, WXXI's Connections with Evan Dawson interviewed Michael Oberg and Dr. Cate Denial, director of the Bright Institute at Knox College, about this evaluation method, and you can listen to that discussion prior to the presentation

Grading agreement - HIST 261

Video recording of the presentation

Audio recording of the presentation

Chat transcript

September 1, 2020 Collaborative Online International Learning Partnering Fair & Bulletin

Title: Collaborative Online International Learning Partnering Fair

Who: SUNY Center for Collaborative Online International Learning (COIL)

Description: If you are looking for new COIL teaching partners (for the Spring 2021 semester and beyond), come to the Virtual Partnering Fair on September 1. The COIL Partnering Bulletin and Fair are for all professors who are seeking a new COIL teaching partner. The Virtual Partnering Fair will be held on Tuesday, September 1, 9:00 – 10:30 AM ET.  The Fair is open to all professors or coordinators and will feature opportunities to discuss partnering interests/needs.

COIL Partnering Bulletin