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Upcoming Programs and Events

Monday, May 18 1:00-2:30pm (Zoom)

Title: Spring 2020 Debrief, Reflection and Lessons Learned

Links:

Webinar Video Recording

Webinar Audio Recording

Debrief and reflection slides

Description: We are looking to gather feedback and learn from the rapid shift to remote instruction during the Spring 2020 semester. To that end, the Teaching and Learning Center (TLC) will offer a "Debrief and Reflection" session on Monday, May 18 from 1:00-2:30 pm (via Zoom). In preparation for that meeting, as well as to give voice to those who cannot attend, we'd like to capture details regarding what worked well, challenges experienced, unintended outcomes (both positive and negative), outstanding questions, and the lessons learned as you plan for the Fall 2020 semester. https://forms.gle/gFuACRVQG9U24Ji59

Wednesday, May 20 2:00-3:30pm (Zoom)

Title: Remote Ready Modules and Active Learning

Links:

Webinar Video Recording

Webinar Audio Recording

Remote Ready Modules and Active Learning slides

Description: Geneseo faculty and staff share what it means to be remote-ready for Fall 2020. In addition, a basic introduction to syllabus & course design as well as active-learning and student-centered teaching strategies will be offered.

Thursday, May 21 3:00-4:00pm (Zoom)

Title: Academic Council Session with Chairs and Deans

Click here for Zoom info and to add the session to your Google Calendar

Description: During the week after commencement, the TLC will be organizing a number of professional development opportunities for faculty to support “remote-ready” approaches to the fall semester. On Thursday, May 21 from 3-4 there will be a session specifically for chairs and deans. This will be an opportunity to debrief and share reflections on the spring semester and discuss the role that academic unit leaders can play in assisting faculty and students with planning for the fall.

In preparation for that meeting, as well as to give voice to those who cannot attend, we'd like to capture details regarding what worked well, challenges experienced, unintended outcomes (both positive and negative), outstanding questions, and the lessons learned as you plan for the Fall 2020 semester. https://forms.gle/gFuACRVQG9U24Ji59  

Friday, May 22 2:00-3:30pm (Zoom)

Title: Universal Design for Learning

Click here for Zoom info and to add the session to your Google Calendar

Description: Members of CIT and the Office of Accessibility share an introduction to the basic principles of Universal Design for Learning.

Please rsvp for any event by e-mailing tlc@geneseo.edu.

**Note: rsvp's are requested for attendance purposes only so we can ensure
enough space and snacks for everyone. If you find that you are able to
attend, but have not rsvp'd, you are more than welcome to do so.

Past and Completed Programs

September 13, 2019, 2:30 - 3:30pm (Doty 302E)

Title: Cross-institutional Collaboration: Hybrid Course Sharing in Native American Studies (INCLUSIVITY)

Who: Caroline Woidat, PhD, English

Description: Part of the "Models of Integrative Learning Series" sponsored jointly by the TLC and CIL to share existing examples of integrative projects, and to help prepare faculty and staff to apply for SUNY PIF supported funding to develop sustainable integrative learning curricular materials.

September 17, 2019, 11:30am-12:30pm (Doty 302E)

Title: The Power of the Pause: Mindfulness-Based Strategies for the Classroom

Who: Beth Cholette, PhD, RYT (she/her/hers) Clinical Director for South Village Counseling Services

Description: What can you do to foster a classroom environment that allows students to be both focused and calm? Discover ways to take a powerful pause with in-class strategies that you can incorporate in either 5- or 15-minutes. Also learn about how you can bring a mindfulness-based program (meditation, yoga, or both) to your classroom.

Beth Cholette is a clinical psychologist and certified yoga instructor who teaches yoga and mindfulness-based meditation on campus. Beth is able to adapt yoga/meditation for classroom settings, and she is happy to work with faculty/staff to create specific sessions to meet pedagogical needs.

September 24, 2019, 11:30am-12:30pm (Doty 302E)

Title: The Power of the Pause: Self-Care Strategies for Faculty

Who: Beth Cholette, PhD, RYT (she/her/hers) Clinical Director for South Village Counseling Services

Description: The most important time for self-care is when you don't have time! Learn strategies designed to produce grounding, focus, relaxation/release, and increased energy, each of which you can incorporate in just 5 minutes.

Beth Cholette is a clinical psychologist and certified yoga instructor who teaches yoga and mindfulness-based meditation on campus. Beth is able to adapt yoga/meditation for classroom settings, and she is happy to work with faculty/staff to create specific sessions to meet pedagogical needs.

September 25, 2019, 4:00 - 5:30pm (Doty 302E)

Title: Creating Data Analytics Courses and Programs for Geneseo Students: Initiatives in the School of Business

Who: Professors Christian Shin, Weizhe Weng, and Dean Mary Ellen Zuckerman

Description: The School of Business has been teaching a data analytics course for several years. This year that course became required for its majors. The school is currently moving forward a Data Analytics Minor, which will be open to students from all majors if they have the prerequisites. Professor Christian Shin and Weizhe Weng, as well as Dean Mary Ellen Zuckerman will talk about the work the School of Business has been doing in the area of data analytics, what the current and proposed courses focus on and other future plans around data analytics. The School is looking for dialogue, partnerships and information sharing around this initiative.

September 26, 2019, 4:00 - 5:30pm (Doty 302E)

Title: Introduction to Growth Mindset - Facilitated Discussion of Carol Dweck

Who: Dave Parfitt, Director, Teaching and Learning Center; Laura Swanson, Staff Counselor, Health and Counseling; Suann Yang, Associate Professor, Biology

Description: This is the first in a series of programs focused on growth mindset and student-centered pedagogy.

During this session we will collectively watch a presentation by Dr. Carol Dweck (Psychology, Stanford) on "growth mindset." Dweck is an educational psychologist and leading researcher in the field of motivation. This talk focuses on ways to think about a problem that’s slightly too hard for you to solve. Are you not smart enough to solve it … or have you just not solved it yet? This will serve as an introduction to "growth mindset" and contrast it with a "fixed mindset." This will serve as an introduction to the concept. After watching Dr. Dweck's presentation, we will facilitate a discussion about how the concept of "growth mindset" applies to our students and teaching. Dr. Carol Dweck serves as the Lewis and Virginia Eaton Professor of Education in the Department of Psychology at Stanford University

September 27, 2019, 2:30 - 3:30pm (Doty 302E)

Title: Short, Portable Modules: Digital Online Modules for Environment Sustainability (SUSTAINABILITY)

Who: Karleen West, PhD, Political Science & International Relations and Suann Yang, PhD, Biology

Description: Part of the "Models of Integrative Learning Series" sponsored jointly by the TLC and CIL to share existing examples of integrative projects, and to help prepare faculty and staff to apply for SUNY PIF supported funding to develop sustainable integrative learning curricular materials.

September 30, 2019, 12:00 - 1:30pm (Doty 302E)

Title: Reading Group - Teach Students How to Learn, Saundra Yancy McGuire Part 1

Who: Joe Cope, Interim Associate Provost for Student Success, and Dave Parfitt, Director, Teaching and Learning Center

Description: Part of a series of programs focused on growth mindset and student-centered pedagogy. Initial discussion of Saundra Yancy McGuire’s 2015 book “Teach Students How to Learn.” Focused on strategies you can incorporate into any course to improve student metacognition, study skills, and motivation. Limited copies of the book will be available for those who wish to start on the reading, but completion of the book is not required to participate. A follow-up discussion will occur on November 25 once people have more time with the text. The 2018 student version of this book, “Teach Yourself How to Learn.” is currently being used to pilot a new first year seminar course for students with undeclared majors.

Dr. Saundra Yancy McGuire is the Director Emerita of the Center for Academic Success and retired Assistant Vice Chancellor and Professor of Chemistry at Louisiana State University. Prior to joining LSU, she spent eleven years at Cornell University, where she received the coveted Clark Distinguished Teaching Award.

October 11, 2019, 2:30 - 3:30pm (Doty 302E)

Title: Community Engagement: Adopt-a-Business Internship (CIVIC RESPONSIBILITY; CREATIVITY)

Who: Nicole Manapol, Director, Letchworth Gateway Villages and Dave Parfitt, PhD, Teaching and Learning Center

Description: Part of the "Models of Integrative Learning Series" sponsored jointly by the TLC and CIL to share existing examples of integrative projects, and to help prepare faculty and staff to apply for SUNY PIF supported funding to develop sustainable integrative learning curricular materials.

October 15, 2019, 9:00am - 4:00pm (Buckland Park, Brighton)

Title: Teach to Engage Day

Description: TBA

October 23, 2019, 4:00 - 5:30pm (Doty 302E)

Title: Data Analytics Summit - Data in the Humanities

Who: Ken Cooper, English; Elizabeth McManus, Languages & Literatures; Paul Schacht, English, Assistant to the Provost for Digital Learning and Scholarship

Description: The second in a series of presentations of the Data Analytics Summit. The purpose of this series is to bring together the various campus stakeholders to present their visions of where the field of data analytics is going, what is currently being done at SUNY Geneseo, and where they want this to go on campus.

October 25, 2019, 11:30am - 1:00pm (Doty 302E)

Title: Writing a Learner-Centered Syllabus

Who: Suann Yang, Associate Professor, Biology and Thea Yurkewecz, Assistant Professor, School of Education

Description: Part of a series of programs focused on growth mindset and student-centered pedagogy. Details TBA

October 25, 2019, 2:30 - 3:30pm (Doty 302E)

Title: Cross-disciplinary Courses: Geneseo Green Quotient (LEARNING)

Who: Ken Cooper, PhD, English and Chris Annala, PhD, Business

Description: Part of the "Models of Integrative Learning Series" sponsored jointly by the TLC and CIL to share existing examples of integrative projects, and to help prepare faculty and staff to apply for SUNY PIF supported funding to develop sustainable integrative learning curricular materials.

November 1, 2019, 2:30 - 3:30pm (Doty 302E)

Title: Workshop: Writing an Integrative Learning Funding Proposal

Who: Center for Integrative Learning

Description: Part of the "Models of Integrative Learning Series" sponsored jointly by the TLC and CIL to share existing examples of integrative projects, and to help prepare faculty and staff to apply for SUNY PIF supported funding to develop sustainable integrative learning curricular materials.

November 6, 2019, 4:00 - 5:30pm (Doty 302E)

Title: Data Analytics Summit - Key Issues for Social Sciences in the Era of Big Data

Who: Michael Restivo, Sociology

Description:  Third in a series of presentations of the Data Analytics Summit. The purpose of this series is to bring together the various campus stakeholders to present their visions of where the field of data analytics is going, what is currently being done at SUNY Geneseo, and where they want this to go on campus.

November 13, 2019, 11:30am - 1:30pm (Doty 302E)

Title: Fulbright Forum Lunch

Who: Geneseo Faculty Fulbright Recipients

Description: Join an informal discussion over lunch (provided) with faculty and staff who have received Fulbright Fellowships in the past. Fulbright panelists will speak for a few minutes about their experience and answer questions from colleagues. Staff members from the Office of Sponsored Research will also be on hand to answer any questions regarding the application process.

Confirmed Fulbright participants include: Glenn Geiser-Getz (Provost’s Office), William Anyan (Biology), Mackenzie Gerringer (Biology), Jun Okada (English), Denise Scott (Sociology)

November 13, 2019, 2:30pm - 3:45pm (Doty 302E)

Title: Dominant Narratives of a Geneseo Education

Who: Laura Swanson, Student Health & Counseling and Heather Wilhelm Routenberg, Academic Planning and Advising

Description: Part of a series of programs focused on growth mindset and student-centered pedagogy. Join us for a discussion about identity and higher education. Dominant narratives serve the interests of dominant social groups while minimizing the experiences of others. While they often pass as objective, they are not, though they are normalized and ingrained into common cultural phrasings. These narratives can influence our assumptions and lead to prescriptive, rather than collaborative, practices in teaching, advising, and support. In this discussion, we will unpack the specific dominant narratives of a Geneseo education. How do we define the ‘typical Geneseo student’? Participants will learn to recognize dominant narratives and brainstorm counter narratives to foster a culture of equitable opportunities for learning and growth.

November 20, 2019, 4:00 - 5:30pm (Milne 213)

Title: Data Analytics Summit - White Paper Development

Who: TBA

Description: Final in a series of presentations of the Data Analytics Summit. This workshop will bring all parties interested in data analytics together to create a document summarizing the views and paths discussed to help with future planning for this field. We hope to identify synergies between the various efforts, and engage in a discussion about potential collaborations.

November 25, 2019, 12:00 - 1:30pm (Doty 302E)

Title: Reading Group - Teach Students How to Learn, Saundra Yancy McGuire Part 2

Who: Dave Parfitt, Director, Teaching and Learning Center and Joe Cope, Interim Associate Provost for Student Success

Description: Part of a series of programs focused on growth mindset and student-centered pedagogy. Initial discussion of Saundra Yancy McGuire’s 2015 book “Teach Students How to Learn.” Focused on strategies you can incorporate into any course to improve student metacognition, study skills, and motivation. The 2018 student version of this book, “Teach Yourself How to Learn.” is currently being used to pilot a new first year seminar course for students with undeclared majors.

Dr. Saundra Yancy McGuire is the Director Emerita of the Center for Academic Success and retired Assistant Vice Chancellor and Professor of Chemistry at Louisiana State University. Prior to joining LSU, she spent eleven years at Cornell University, where she received the coveted Clark Distinguished Teaching Award.

February 21, 2020, 2:30-4:00pm (Bailey 203)

Title: First Year Seminar Summit

Who: Joe Cope (Associate Provost for Academic Success and Professor of History), Scott Giorgis (Intro to Geology course), Gabe Iturbides (AOP student success seminar), and Suann Yang (Biology first year experiences)

Description: Part of a series of programs focused on growth mindset and student-centered pedagogy. The First Year Seminar Summit is intended to share information about academic initiatives at Geneseo that help first year students engage with the college, understand the curriculum, and implement study skills that can lead to success in the classroom. The summit will begin with a panel discussion by faculty and staff who have been involved in departmental “introduction to the major” courses, the fall 2019 pilot of a first year seminar for undeclared students, and AOP’s Strategies for College Success course. We’ll also share information about national research on first year seminars, assessment data on local initiatives, and strategies for engaging first year students. Anyone who is interested in learning more about first year seminars at the college, developing a first year experience within their area, or incorporating similar engagement and success strategies into other programs.

February 27, 2020, 10:00-11:30am (Doty 302E)

Title: Academic Coaches Learning Community

Who: Leah Houk (Academic Planning and Advising), Heather Wilhelm Routenberg (Academic Planning and Advising), and Dave Parfitt (Teaching and Learning Center)

Description: Applying deep learning strategies for midterms & preparing for advising appointments in advance of registration.

This Academic Coaching Learning Community is a series of professional development sessions held monthly to assist you in serving your advisees as well as the broader student community. This time will offer the opportunity to explore concrete activities and strategies you can apply with your advisees to foster their growth.

March 6, 2020, 2:30-3:30pm (Doty 302E)

Title: First-Year Student Motivation and Well-Being: A Self-Determination Theory Perspective

Who: Nick Palumbo (he/him/his) Assistant Dean of Students for Leadership and Service

Description: Interested in learning about new approaches to motivating first-year students? Learn some empirically grounded strategies and approaches to motivate first-year students while enhancing their well-being and vitality. In addition to practical tools, this event also aims to provide an overview of Self-Determination Theory, a broad meta-theoretical framework for studying and understanding human motivation and personality.

Nick Palumbo is a Self-Determination Theory researcher and director of the Geneseo Opportunities for Leadership Development (GOLD) program on campus. Nick actively applies Self-Determination Theory across contexts on campus, and he is happy to work with faculty/staff to evaluate and improve the quality of students' motivation.

March 9, 2020, 3:30-5:00pm (Newton 202)

Title: Mental Health Town Hall

Who: TBD

Description: How do we work together as a campus to support mental health? All students, faculty, staff, and administrators are invited to the 3rd Annual Mental Health Town Hall. Join us as we share authentic narratives, explore concerns and ideas for growth, and inspire our campus to act. There will be an open forum for questions and comments. To submit a question in advance and learn more, visit go.geneseo.edu/mentalhealth.

March 12, 2020, 10:30-11:30am (Doty 300, Tower Room)

Title: What Do Our Syllabi Really Say?

Who: Dr. Catherine Denial, Bright Distinguished Professor of American History, Chair of the History Department, and Director of the Bright Institute at Knox College in Galesburg, Illinois

Description: Syllabi are vital documents that help us communicate our expectations and guide students through our courses. But what else do they (often inadvertently) say? Join Cate Denial as she reveals some startling truths she discovered about her own syllabi, and helps participants to match their identity as teachers with the language used in their syllabus.

March 25, 2020, 2:30-3:30pm (Rescheduled)

Title: Writing Self-Reflective Statements for Tenure and Promotion

Who: TBA

Description: TBA

March 26, 2020, 10:00-11:30am (Doty 302E)

Title: Academic Coaches Learning Community

Who: Leah Houk (Academic Planning and Advising), Heather Wilhelm Routenberg (Academic Planning and Advising), and Dave Parfitt (Teaching and Learning Center)

Description: This Academic Coaching Learning Community is a series of professional development sessions held monthly to assist you in serving your advisees as well as the broader student community. This time will offer the opportunity to explore concrete activities and strategies you can apply with your advisees to foster their growth.

March 26, 2020, 3:00-4:00pm (FREE Webinar)

Title: Trauma-Informed Teaching & Learning

Recording of this free webinar

Slides from this webinar

Who: Mays Imad, Ph.D.

Description: As COVID-19 continues to spread throughout the country, many institutions of higher education have suspended classes, converted to virtual formats, and/or closed on-campus food and housing facilities. These changes not only disrupt students’ educational pathways, but also their daily lives, impacting their emotional and mental well-being. This webinar will examine the impact of traumatic experiences on students’ learning, and discuss strategies that can be used to mitigate this impact and improve educational outcomes.  

Mays Imad is the Coordinator of the Teaching & Learning Center at Pima Community College. She also teaches pathophysiology and biomedical ethics. She received her undergraduate training in Philosophy from the University of Michigan and her graduate training in Cellular & Clinical Neurobiology from Wayne State University-School of Medicine. Mays's current research focuses on stress, self-awareness, advocacy, and classroom community, and how these relate to cognition, metacognition, and, ultimately, student learning.

April 1, 2020, 2:00-3:30pm (Free Webinar)

Title: Managing Stress During Distance Learning – How Faculty Can Support Their Students

Recording of this Webinar. Through this link you can also download slides and a transcript of the presentation.  

Who: Sofia B. Pertuz, Ph.D., Chief Diversity and Inclusion Officer and Senior Advisor for The JED Foundation moderates a panel of experts

Description: Faculty play an important role in the lives of college students, especially during times of uncertainty. As colleges and universities navigate the constantly evolving changes in response to COVID-19, we recognize that there is much stress and anxiety that instructors need to manage whether they were already teaching online or were recently required to shift to online modes of content delivery for students.

April 3, 2020, 1:00-2:00pm (Free Webinar)

Title: Teaching and Learning Online: Innovation Under Pressure

free recording of the program is available here, and a written summary of the event appeared in the April 8 edition of The Scholarly Kitchen.

Who: Heather Reid, Dean of the Library at Berklee College of Music; Derek Bruff, Director of the Center for Teaching, Vanderbilt University; Michael Reese, Associate Dean/Director of Center of Educational Resources, Johns Hopkins University; Jon Shaw, Associate Vice Provost and Deputy University Librarian, University of Pennsylvania; Bryan Alexander, Independent Analyst and Consultant; Polly Thistlethwaite, Interim University Dean for Library Services, City University of New York (CUNY)

Description: In the last month, many academic institutions have managed to shift their classroom instruction to an online learning environment. Such rapid adaptation of pedagogy and delivery offers both opportunities for innovation as well as logistical challenges for faculty and their libraries alike. This 60-minute, roundtable event draws together administrators from a range of roles and institution types to discuss some of the lessons learned, how they are managing, what has been involved in moving to online instruction with little advance notice, and to share useful techniques for navigating the inevitable constraints as well as potential strategies for success. 

April 6, 2020, 2:00-3:00pm (Free Webinar)

Title: Managing your Online Presence - Association of College and University Educators (ACUE)

Links:

Who: Flower Darby, Director of Teaching for Student Success, Northern Arizona University; Kevin Gannon, Director of the Center for Excellence in Teaching and Learning (CETL) and Professor of History, Grand View University; April Mondy, Instructor in Management, Delta State University

Description: One of the most important aspects—if not the most important aspect—of any student’s learning is you, the instructor. Learn how to more effectively be involved in discussions, respond to questions, provide feedback and encouragement, so students feel more supported and engaged in your course.

April 9, 2020, 2:00-3:00pm (Free Webinar)

Title: Organizing your Online Courses - Association of College and University Educators (ACUE)

Links:

Who: April E. Mondy, Instructor of Management, Delta State University; Alyson Snowe, Assistant Professor, English Department, Community College of Rhode Island; Michael Wesch, Associate Professor of Cultural Anthropology, Kansas State University

Description: Students can become confused, frustrated, or disengaged if they find it challenging to simply navigate a course learning environment. Learn how to organize your course from the students’ point of view—using tools like creating a module roadmap, creating a predictable rhythm, and more.

April 14, 2020, 2:00-3:00pm (Free Webinar)

Title: Planning and Facilitating Quality Discussions - Association of College and University Educators (ACUE)

Links:

Who: Flower Darby, Director of Teaching for Student Success, Northern Arizona University; Viji Sathy, Teaching Associate Professor in the Department of Psychology and Neuroscience and Special Projects Assistant to the Dean of Undergraduate Education, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; Ludwika A. Goodson, co-author of Online Teaching at Its Best

Description: Learn techniques to help students get the most out of online discussions. Learn and discuss with online teaching and learning experts how to provide rubrics, create reflection activities, provide strategic feedback and more.

April 17, 2020, 2:00-3:00pm (Free Webinar)

Title: Recording Effective Microlectures - Association of College and University Educators (ACUE)

Links:

Who: Michael Wesch, Associate Professor of Cultural Anthropology, Kansas State University; Viji Sathy, Teaching Associate Professor in the Department of Psychology and Neuroscience and Special Projects Assistant to the Dean of Undergraduate Education, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Description: Microlectures are short (6 minutes or less), instructor-produced videos that are designed using a structured format to provide effective explanations of a single key concept or specific skill set. Learn how to use this format to help maintain student attention and allow students to reengage with the content when and if needed.

April 17, 2020, 2:00-3:00pm (Free Webinar)

Title: Designing High-Impact Practices for Equity and Impact in New Contexts - Association of American Colleges and Universities (AACU)

Link: View Recording of Webinar

Who: Tia McNair, Vice President for Diversity, Equity, and Student Success, AACU; George Sanchez, University of Southern California; Timothy K. Eatman, Rutgers University-Newark; Chris N. Navia, University of Wisconsin System Administration

Description: High-impact practices are known to deepen learning and engagement and to promote student success, but how readily do they translate to new contexts? Can faculty design similarly impactful teaching and learning practices even as they adapt to the sudden and massive shift to virtual environments now underway? Join the conversation to share strategies for supporting student success and advancing equity in new contexts—during the COVID-19 crisis and beyond.

April 20, 2020, 2:00-3:00pm (Free Webinar)

Title: Engaging Students in Readings and Microlectures - Association of College and University Educators (ACUE)

Links:

Who: Flower Darby, Director of Teaching for Student Success, Northern Arizona University; Ludwika A. Goodson, Co-author of Online Teaching at Its Best; Catherine (Cat) Haras, Senior Director of the Center for Effective Teaching and Learning, Cal State LA

Description: There are a variety of ways to keep students engaged in the content and help them focus their attention on what is most important. Learn how to use a variety of practices to assess how well they are learning and making key connections, such as using guiding questions, preparing online discussion forums, developing skeletal outlines and more.

April 23, 2020, 10:00-11:30am

Title: Academic Coaches Learning Community

Who: Leah Houk (Academic Planning and Advising), Heather Wilhelm Routenberg (Academic Planning and Advising), and Dave Parfitt (Teaching and Learning Center)

Description: This Academic Coaching Learning Community is a series of professional development sessions held monthly to assist you in serving your advisees as well as the broader student community. This time will offer the opportunity to explore concrete activities and strategies you can apply with your advisees to foster their growth.

April 27, 2020, 1:00-2:00pm

Title: Motivating Geneseo Students for Success at the End of the Term

Who: Leah Houk (Academic Planning and Advising), Nick Palumbo (Center for Community), Dave Parfitt (Teaching and Learning Center), and Thea Yurkewecz (School of Education)

Links:

Slides from the presentation

Audio and video of the webinar

Audio only of webinar 

Description: Student stress and anxiety levels typically increase towards the end of the semester, and this end-of-semester nervousness is only compounded by the wide-range of complications due to the COVID-19 global pandemic. This TLC workshop will give faculty & staff practical tips from their SUNY Geneseo colleagues for supporting our student's motivation and success. In addition, we will discuss how to design student-centered strategies to mitigate the impact of stress and improve their learning. 

May 8, 2020 4:00-5:00 pm

Title: Recognizing the Reptile, Living With the Lion - Responding To Trauma In College Classrooms

Who: Katherine E. Standefer

Click here to watch a recording of this presentation

Description: In this one-hour presentation, learn what trauma is, how it can present in the classroom, and what it looks like to cultivate supportive, trauma-sensitive spaces. Professor Standefer is a leading voice in trauma writing methodologies and the author of Lightning Flowers: My Journey to Uncover the Cost of Saving a Life, forthcoming in 2020 from Little, Brown Spark.

All faculty, staff, and students are welcome to attend. We will be recording this session for those not able to attend May 8 at 4pm. For questions about this webinar, please contact Sonya Bilocerkowycz (sbilocerkowycz@geneseo.edu).