Breadcrumb

Doug Baldwin

Professor Of Mathematics
South 307
245-5659
baldwin@geneseo.edu

Professor Baldwin has been a member of the Geneseo faculty since 1990. Originally holding a position in computer science, he joined the mathematics department in 2013.

My Complete CV

Doug-Baldwin

Office Hours

Any time Monday - Friday, 8:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m., unless I'm already committed to something. See my Google calendar for details of when I'm free.

Curriculum Vitae

Education

  • B.Sc., 1980, Yale University

  • M.Sc., 1981, Yale University

  • Ph.D., 1985, Yale University

Publications

  • Can We "Flip" Non-Major Programming Courses Yet? Douglas Baldwin, Proceedings of the 46th ACM Technical Symposium on Computer Science Education, 2015

  • The Roles of Mathematics in Computer Science. Douglas Baldwin, Henry M. Walker, Peter B. Henderson, ACM Inroads, 2013

  • Is Computer Science a Relevant Academic Discipline for the 21st Century? Douglas Baldwin, IEEE Computer, 2011

  • Case Studies of Liberal Arts Computer Science Programs. Douglas Baldwin, Alyce Brady, Andrea Danyluk, Joel Adams, Andrea Lawrence, ACM Transactions on Computing Education, 2010

  • Surface Reconstruction from Constructive Solid Geometry for Interactive Visualization. Douglas Baldwin, Third International Symposium on Visual Computing (Springer: Lecture Notes in Computer Science 4841), 2007

  • SIGCSE Committee Report on the Implementation of a Discrete Mathematics Course. Bill Marion and Douglas Baldwin, 2007

  • Effectiveness of a Language Implementation Project in Building Appreciation for Formal Specification. Douglas Baldwin, Consortium for Computing Sciences in Colleges Northeastern Conference, 2007

  • Algorithms and Data Structures: The Science of Computing Douglas Baldwin and Greg Scragg, Charles River Media, 2004.

  • A Compiler for Teaching about Compilers. Doug Baldwin, Proceedings of the 34th SIGCSE Technical Symposium on Computer Science Education, 2003

  • Discovery Learning in Computer Science. Douglas Baldwin, Proceedings of the Twenty-Seventh SIGCSE Technical Symposium on Computer Science Education, Mar. 1996.

Research Interests

My main research interests are in computer graphics, particularly procedural modelling of natural objects (e.g., terrains, plants, etc.) I am currently beginning a project aimed at studying what if any mathematical and algorithmic models can describe crystal aggregates in computer graphics. I also recently completed IViPP, a scientific visualization project in particle physics. Other interests include the role of mathematics in computer science, and programming languages and methods.

Classes

  • INTD 105: WrtgSem:Secrets & Secret Codes

    Writing Seminar is a course focusing on a specific topic while emphasizing writing practice and instruction, potentially taught by any member of the College faculty. Because this is primarily a course in writing, reading assignments will be briefer than in traditional topic courses, and students will prove their understanding of the subject matter through writing compositions rather than taking examinations. Corequisite: INTD 106.

  • MATH 223: Calculus III

    Vector calculus, functions of several variables, partial derivatives, multiple integrals, space analytic geometry, and line integrals. Prerequisites: MATH 222. Offered every semester

  • MATH 304: Theory of Computability

    This course covers the theoretical limits on what algorithms can and cannot compute. Topics include finite automata, regular languages, push-down automata, context-free languages, Turing machines, decidability, the structure of the classes of computable and uncomputable problems, and the relationships between computability and the logical limits of mathematics. Prerequisites: MATH 239. Not offered on a regular basis.