Breadcrumb

Doug Baldwin

Professor Of Mathematics
Mathematics
South 307
245-5659
baldwin@geneseo.edu

Professor Baldwin has been a member of the Geneseo faculty since 1990. Originally holding a position in computer science, he joined the mathematics department in 2013.

My Complete CV

Doug Baldwin

Office Hours

Any time Monday - Friday, 8:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m., unless I'm already committed to something. See my Google calendar for details of when I'm free.

Curriculum Vitae

Education

  • B.Sc., 1980, Yale University

  • M.Sc., 1981, Yale University

  • Ph.D., 1985, Yale University

Publications

  • Can We "Flip" Non-Major Programming Courses Yet? Douglas Baldwin, Proceedings of the 46th ACM Technical Symposium on Computer Science Education, 2015

  • The Roles of Mathematics in Computer Science. Douglas Baldwin, Henry M. Walker, Peter B. Henderson, ACM Inroads, 2013

  • Is Computer Science a Relevant Academic Discipline for the 21st Century? Douglas Baldwin, IEEE Computer, 2011

  • Case Studies of Liberal Arts Computer Science Programs. Douglas Baldwin, Alyce Brady, Andrea Danyluk, Joel Adams, Andrea Lawrence, ACM Transactions on Computing Education, 2010

  • Surface Reconstruction from Constructive Solid Geometry for Interactive Visualization. Douglas Baldwin, Third International Symposium on Visual Computing (Springer: Lecture Notes in Computer Science 4841), 2007

  • SIGCSE Committee Report on the Implementation of a Discrete Mathematics Course. Bill Marion and Douglas Baldwin, 2007

  • Effectiveness of a Language Implementation Project in Building Appreciation for Formal Specification. Douglas Baldwin, Consortium for Computing Sciences in Colleges Northeastern Conference, 2007

  • Algorithms and Data Structures: The Science of Computing Douglas Baldwin and Greg Scragg, Charles River Media, 2004.

  • A Compiler for Teaching about Compilers. Doug Baldwin, Proceedings of the 34th SIGCSE Technical Symposium on Computer Science Education, 2003

  • Discovery Learning in Computer Science. Douglas Baldwin, Proceedings of the Twenty-Seventh SIGCSE Technical Symposium on Computer Science Education, Mar. 1996.

Research Interests

My main research interests are in computer graphics, particularly procedural modelling of natural objects (e.g., terrains, plants, etc.) I am currently beginning a project aimed at studying what if any mathematical and algorithmic models can describe crystal aggregates in computer graphics. I also recently completed IViPP, a scientific visualization project in particle physics. Other interests include the role of mathematics in computer science, and programming languages and methods.

Classes

  • INTD 105: WrtgSem:Secrets & Secret Codes

    Writing Seminar is a course focusing on a specific topic while emphasizing writing practice and instruction, potentially taught by any member of the College faculty. Because this is primarily a course in writing, reading assignments will be briefer than in traditional topic courses, and students will prove their understanding of the subject matter through writing compositions rather than taking examinations.

  • MATH 223: Calculus III

    Vector calculus, functions of several variables, partial derivatives, multiple integrals, space analytic geometry, and line integrals. Prerequisites: MATH 222. Offered every semester

  • MATH 304: Theory of Computability

    This course covers the theoretical limits on what algorithms can and cannot compute. Topics include finite automata, regular languages, push-down automata, context-free languages, Turing machines, decidability, the structure of the classes of computable and uncomputable problems, and the relationships between computability and the logical limits of mathematics. Prerequisites: MATH 239. Not offered on a regular basis.