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Doug Baldwin

Professor Of Mathematics
South 307
245-5659
baldwin@geneseo.edu

Professor Baldwin has been a member of the Geneseo faculty since 1990. Originally holding a position in computer science, he joined the mathematics department in 2013.

My Complete CV

Doug-Baldwin

Office Hours

Any time Monday - Friday, 8:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m., unless I'm already committed to something. See my Google calendar for details of when I'm free.

Curriculum Vitae

Education

  • B.Sc., 1980, Yale University

  • M.Sc., 1981, Yale University

  • Ph.D., 1985, Yale University

Publications

  • Report of the SIGCSE Committee on Computing Education in Liberal Arts Colleges. Douglas Baldwin, Amanda Holland-Minkley, and Grant Braught, ACM Inroads, June 2019.

  • Can We "Flip" Non-Major Programming Courses Yet? Douglas Baldwin, Proceedings of the 46th ACM Technical Symposium on Computer Science Education, 2015

  • The Roles of Mathematics in Computer Science. Douglas Baldwin, Henry M. Walker, Peter B. Henderson, ACM Inroads, 2013

  • Is Computer Science a Relevant Academic Discipline for the 21st Century? Douglas Baldwin, IEEE Computer, 2011

  • Case Studies of Liberal Arts Computer Science Programs. Douglas Baldwin, Alyce Brady, Andrea Danyluk, Joel Adams, Andrea Lawrence, ACM Transactions on Computing Education, 2010

  • Surface Reconstruction from Constructive Solid Geometry for Interactive Visualization. Douglas Baldwin, Third International Symposium on Visual Computing (Springer: Lecture Notes in Computer Science 4841), 2007

  • SIGCSE Committee Report on the Implementation of a Discrete Mathematics Course. Bill Marion and Douglas Baldwin, 2007

  • Effectiveness of a Language Implementation Project in Building Appreciation for Formal Specification. Douglas Baldwin, Consortium for Computing Sciences in Colleges Northeastern Conference, 2007

  • Algorithms and Data Structures: The Science of Computing Douglas Baldwin and Greg Scragg, Charles River Media, 2004.

  • A Compiler for Teaching about Compilers. Doug Baldwin, Proceedings of the 34th SIGCSE Technical Symposium on Computer Science Education, 2003

  • Discovery Learning in Computer Science. Douglas Baldwin, Proceedings of the Twenty-Seventh SIGCSE Technical Symposium on Computer Science Education, Mar. 1996.

Research Interests

My main research interests are in computer graphics, particularly procedural modelling of natural objects (e.g., terrains, plants, etc.) I am currently beginning a project aimed at studying what if any mathematical and algorithmic models can describe crystal aggregates in computer graphics. I also recently completed IViPP, a scientific visualization project in particle physics. Other interests include the role of mathematics in computer science, and programming languages and methods.

Classes

  • INTD 105: WrtgSem:Secrets & Secret Codes

    Writing Seminar is a course focusing on a specific topic while emphasizing writing practice and instruction, potentially taught by any member of the College faculty. Because this is primarily a course in writing, reading assignments will be briefer than in traditional topic courses, and students will prove their understanding of the subject matter through writing compositions rather than taking examinations. Corequisite: INTD 106.

  • MATH 221: R/Calculus I

    Topics studied are limits and continuity; derivatives and antiderivatives of the algebraic, exponential, logarithmic, trigonometric, and inverse functions; the definite integral; and the fundamental theorem of the calculus. Prerequisites: MATH 112 or Precalculus with trigonometry or the equivalent. Offered every semester

  • MATH 384: Computational Graphics

    An introduction to the mathematical and computational modeling of the visible world. Topics include vector representations of three-dimensional geometry; parametric and implicit forms of lines and surfaces; affine transformations; projections from three dimensions to two; rendering equations that model reflection, transmission, and absorption of light. Realistic models of real or imagined scenes will be created using these techniques, and drawn using a computer programming language. Prerequisites: MATH 223, MATH 230, and MATH 233. Not offered on a regular basis.