Fall 2021 - Spring 2022

Materials and Recordings from 2021-22 TLC Events

Spring Semester 2022

Ongoing Every Thursday: Faculty/Staff Support Space 12:30-1:20pm

A weekly series of online meetings for faculty & staff to drop-in, share, reflect, and problem solve around classroom, work experiences, and policies. This online support space is meant to allow colleagues to connect, reconnect, build community, and encourage relationships among staff members who might not have yet met. As these are informal drop-in sessions, no RSVP is required to attend. 

Hosted by Dave Parfitt (Teaching & Learning Center)

To access the Zoom link to attend, simply add this event to your calendar.

Ongoing Every Friday: NAVIGATE Office Hours 9:00-9:50am

Questions about using EAB Navigate for data research or assisting students? Join Celia Easton and Laurie Fox on Friday mornings through an open Zoom “Navigate Office Hour.”

Zoom and Google Calendar Link

In spring 2020, the college offered a “soft” rollout of Geneseo’s early alert software, EAB Navigate. Given the myriad of changes that occurred at that same time, faculty and staff may not have had the opportunity to fully adopt this powerful tool. Therefore, we are offering NAVIGATE “office hours” on most Fridays from 9:00-10:00am via Zoom. This is a chance for you to learn more about EAB Navigate and how it plays a critical role in our effort to catch struggling students early when we can still intervene with support resources. These office hours will be hosted by Dr. Celia Easton, Dean of Academic Planning and Advising, Laurie Fox, Director of Educational Technology, and other members of the EAB Navigate implementation team. Please bring any technical questions regarding the platform as well as conceptual issues about how EAB Navigate supports our students’ success. If this time does not work for you, please reach out to schedule an individual appointment.

Introduction to Universal Design for Learning Workshop [Multiple Dates]

From SUNY's Center for Professional Development

Description: This free workshop, currently offered in a hybrid format, provides a comprehensive introduction to the Universal Design for Learning framework.  Participants will learn why the Universal Design for Learning framework is important, how to apply its principles and guidelines to their own courses, and best practices for interacting with students with disabilities.  Additional modules will share strategies to dismantle ableism, incorporate an anti-racist pedagogy, promote social justice, and be more inclusive in the classroom.  Participants in this workshop will apply what they learn about Universal Design for Learning to design a new lesson or revise an existing lesson.

Target audience: Faculty and Instructional Designers

Learning Objectives: Upon successful completion of this workshop, participants will be able to:

Define Universal Design for Learning and differentiate between Universal Design, Universal Design for Learning, accessibility and usability. Differentiate the three principles of UDL and explain how each of the three principles can be applied to their work with students.

Completion Requirements: A series of assignments are incorporated into the workshop modules.  This includes discussion forum assignments and assignments that build toward the creation of a lesson plan based on the Universal Design for Learning framework.  In order to receive a passing evaluation, participants will have to earn a minimum of “Complete” on each assignment.

  • Explain best practices for interacting with students with disabilities.
  • Provide strategies to stop ableism, incorporate anti-racist pedagogy, promote social justice, and be more inclusive when working with students.
  • Recognize barriers to learning in their own instruction and choose UDL strategies that could be used to mitigate those barriers.
  • Apply the UDL framework to create a more inclusive lesson and create a plan to develop and implement this instruction.
  • Determine the next steps to take to build a UDL culture in their discipline, department, college/school or institution.

Session Dates When Workshops Open:

  • April 13, 2022
  • April 25, 2022
  • May 12, 2022

For full details and registration information visit the program page at https://sunycpd.eventsair.com/udl-workshop/

Due April 25 - Funding to Support Faculty Teaching Large Classes

Faculty teaching large enrollment (>50 students) courses next Fall can receive $1,500 funding (from SUNY CPD) to explore instructional technology tools that help facilitate feedback, assessment, and interaction. The goal of this project is to guide professional development and investment in the tools that prove suitable for teaching larger courses. Short application form (10 question survey) due Monday, April 25, apply here

May 5 Recent Trends in Student Substance Use at SUNY Geneseo 2:30pm

Who: Facilitated by Rob Levy, MS, CPP, Community and College Substance Abuse Prevention Coordinator, with Pam Kosmowski, AOD Program Coordinator.

Description: Last fall, approximately 800 Geneseo undergraduates took part in a SUNY-wide survey of substance use behaviors and attitudes. We will look at some of the results of this survey, talk about factors contributing to generally positive trends, and consider possible strategies going forward. 

Click here for Zoom Link and to add to your Google Calendar

May 31 - June 3 SUNY's Conference on Instruction & Technology

An impressive array of speakers were announced for SUNY's Conference on Instruction & Technology (CIT) "Sustaining the Momentum: Building on what we’ve learned" May 31-June 3, 2022. Keynote Speakers will be Viji Sathy and Kelly Hogan, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, "Strategies for Promoting Equity in the College Classroom" and the Closing Speaker is Kevin Gannon, “the tattooed professor”, Grand View University, "A Pedagogy of Hope During the Time of Monsters". The meeting will be held in person at SUNY Oswego. Visit the CIT 2022 website to register.

May 3 Ethical Strategies for Optimizing Your SOFIs 12:30pm

Who: Lee M Pierce, PhD, Asst. Professor, Communication

Description: As the time nears that students will complete their SOFIs, this session discusses ethical strategies for optimizing the process to help both your teaching and your tenure and promotion materials, including: SOFI and assignment timing using the KnightWeb tally invested student outreach practice SOFIs targeted comment prompts None of these strategies will unfairly skew your scores or manipulate students. Rather, they help ensure an informed SOFI process that instructors can design to improve turnout of invested students and mitigate the inherent bias of the process.

SOFI Handout Created by Lee Pierce

April 29 Conversation with our Ukrainian Colleagues 12pm

How can we help? 

Join us for a Collaborative Online International Learning (COIL) conversation with our Ukrainian partner professors.
Friday 29 April
@12pmET /7pmCET Ukraine 

Come listen and Support our colleagues from Ukraine universities.
Consider what you can provide in this forum that is still under construction. 
https://padlet.com/sunycoil/ukraineconnect 

Consider what Ukraine professors are looking for in terms of connection.
Join a mentoring circle of support. 

Register here and Join us on ZOOM 
https://bit.ly/ukrainewearelistening

Due April 25 - Funding to Support Faculty Teaching Large Classes

Faculty teaching large enrollment (>50 students) courses next Fall can receive $1,500 funding (from SUNY CPD) to explore instructional technology tools that help facilitate feedback, assessment, and interaction. The goal of this project is to guide professional development and investment in the tools that prove suitable for teaching larger courses. Short application form (10 question survey) due Monday, April 25, apply here

Due April 25 - Funding to Support Faculty Teaching HyFlex

Faculty teaching HyFlex courses next academic year can receive $2,500 funding (from SUNY CPD) to assess the efficacy of the software tools that enable this mode of instruction. SUNY defines HyFlex as instruction that simultaneously combines online and face-to-face instruction into a single course section, with the mode of direct instruction determined by each individual student (e.g., choice of seated-in-class, connected remotely, or attended at a later time via recording). Short application form (17 question survey) due Monday, April 25, apply here.

April 13, 2022 Collaborative Online International Learning (COIL) Info Session 12:00-1:00pm

Considering adding an online international module to an upcoming in-person class? Collaborative Online International Learning (COIL) connects faculty, students and classes at higher education institutions around the world for discussions, exploration and collaborative project work. Wednesday, April 13 at 12pm ET, SUNY COIL will host an information session for interested instructors and administrators. Click here to register for the Zoom event. 

April 13, 2022 Supporting Ukrainian Professors and Students 7:00pm

One of our Collaborative Online International Learning (COIL) partners in Kyiv shared that professors and scholars from Ukraine are joining the Scholars At Risk event to offer insights into how members of the higher education community can help support colleagues and fellow students affected by the war. The event will be held Wednesday, April 13, at 7pm ET via Zoom, and registration is required in advance. 

Advising for the New General Education and Curriculum Q & A forums [Multiple Dates] 

Join us for this virtual drop-in Q&A session with staff from the Office of Academic Planning and Advising. Geneseo will implement the Geneseo Education for a Connected World curriculum beginning Fall 2022. While it will apply only to students who begin their studies fall '22 and after, there remain many questions about implications for our current students. Please bring your questions and concerns for discussion. We hope to see you there!

Session times are as follows and all via Zoom. Click on the dates/times below for Zoom and Google Calendar Links.

Tuesday, March 29th: 3:00-4:00pm

Monday, April 4th: 2:00-3:00pm

Thursday, April 7th: 9:30-10:30am

March 24, 2022 “Designing your life: What’s this all for?” 1:30pm

Who: Heather Wilhelm Routenberg and Leah Houk, Department of Academic Planning and Advising

Guest Speaker: Heather Morens, Career Design Center

Join the Career Design Center to learn about life design and resources to support students with this process. Life design applies the concepts of design thinking to life experiences in order to create a life that is meaningful, joyful, and fulfilling. It emphasizes the individual being at the center of their own experience, building a compass, and using it to find a way forward by engaging curiosities, trying things out, making adjustments, and embracing change - ultimately using this information to lead to a meaningful career.

This is part of the Academic Coaching TLC Workshop & Seminar Series

1:30-2:30 Workshop session
2:30-3:00 General questions/coaching support (optional) 
**Each session will be recorded for those who can't attend.**

March 17, 2022 Putting it into practice: Tangible study techniques & applications, 1:30pm

Who: Heather Wilhelm Routenberg and Leah Houk, Department of Academic Planning and Advising

Join staff from the Office of Academic Planning and Advising for an interactive session on how to apply active study techniques to help your students deepen their learning and engagement with course material. Resources will be shared and time will be held for practicing these techniques as a group.

This is part of the Academic Coaching TLC Workshop & Seminar Series

1:30-2:30 Workshop session
2:30-3:00 General questions/coaching support (optional) 
**Each session will be recorded for those who can't attend.**

March 3, 2022 Encouraging resilience in our students: Your emotional toolbox

Who: Heather Wilhelm Routenberg and Leah Houk, Department of Academic Planning and Advising

Guest Speakers: Laura Swanson and Cailley Wayman, Counseling Services

Two members of Counseling Services, Laura Swanson, LCSW and Cailley Wayman, LMHC, will discuss various concepts that may help with academic coaching in Spring 2022 and beyond. We will learn the value of critical hope in times of despair, find out why being positive isn't always the best approach, and explore what it means to be emotionally agile.

This is part of the Academic Coaching TLC Workshops & Seminars series

1:30-2:30 Workshop session
2:30-3:00 General questions/coaching support (optional) 
**Each session will be recorded for those who can't attend.**

February 2022 Black History Month Event Series

Throughout the month of February we have scheduled a series of Black History Month events in support of our ongoing effort to become an antiracist college. Details, dates, and recordings can all be found on this separate dedicated webpage.

February 25, 2022 How to Foster Motivation and Engagement in Your Class

Who: Beth McMurtrie and Beckie Supiano, senior writers "Chronicle of Higher Education"

Description: Getting—and holding—students’ attention is the first step in supporting their learning. That has long been a challenge, but the pandemic introduced new hurdles. Masks, distancing and virtual or hybrid classrooms have created physical barriers. And many students find it harder to summon the motivation to learn in the face of widespread uncertainty and stress. How can professors overcome these obstacles, capture students’ interest and maintain their focus?

  • Get ideas for making class time feel meaningful for you and your students
  • Consider common challenges to students’ motivation, and what you can do to help
  • Discover how to incorporate more active learning into your class, whether in person or online
  • Connect with other instructors who face similar challenges
February 23, 2022 Racial Literacy and Equitable Change: From the Writing Classroom to the Campus

In this talk, Dr. Mara Lee Grayson will discuss the necessity of incorporating racial literacy into writing classrooms as part of an integrative approach to antiracist work on a college campus. Participants will be invited to reflect upon their assumptions about writing, language, teaching, and learning and to consider how these assumptions are informed by their own identities and positionalities. Dr. Grayson will offer strategies for students and teachers alike to identify practices that may initially appear benign or even beneficial, but which may in fact perpetuate educational inequity, and to explore antiracist practices and pedagogies that challenge white cultural hegemony. Ultimately, this presentation will encourage teachers and learners of writing to see how writing and literacy instruction are informed by local contexts, cultural practices, and sociopolitical ideologies, and imagine how the writing classroom can become a site for transformation and antiracist change.

February 17, 2022 The power of “yet”. Adopting a Growth Mindset in and outside the classroom

Who: Heather Wilhelm Routenberg and Leah Houk, Department of Academic Planning and Advising

“I was too afraid to go to office hours”, “I’m just not good at math”, “I’m a terrible procrastinator”. Sound familiar? These self-inflicted messages hold our students back from the success they’re capable of, and perpetuate the notion that “I just don’t have what it takes”. Adopting a Growth Mindset actively challenges these messages. Guided by the work of Dr. Carol Dweck, we’ll discuss the theory of Growth Mindset and provide participants with techniques to encourage students to adopt a new way of thinking.

This is part of the Academic Coaching TLC Workshop & Seminar Series

February 10, 2022 How to Use Diversity, Equity and Inclusion in Online Learning

Did you know that a recent survey found that about 70% of students prefer and expect to have online or blended learning environments moving forward?

But with the growth of online learning, how do you overcome the challenges of establishing and using diversity, equity and inclusion (DEI) in a remote environment?

Regardless of your role in higher education or experience with online learning, DEI should be at the forefront of your efforts. During this webinar, industry experts will provide practical strategies to implement DEI and provide key insights such as:

• How DEI improves online learning -- even in some areas you may not expect
• Overcoming obstacles in a remote environment to establish DEI
• Ways to use DEI in online courses to improve student engagement and build a learner community

This webinar was made possible in part by the financial support of Honorlock. I understand that by registering for this webinar, my registration information will be shared with Inside Higher Ed and the sponsor for marketing purposes.

Click here for the webinar recording

February 3, 2022 Applying effective study techniques and the impact of emotional regulation on success

Who: Heather Wilhelm Routenberg and Leah Houk, Department of Academic Planning and Advising

How do you know when you really “know” something? What does it mean to really “learn”? Metacognition and the hierarchy of knowledge answers those questions. They help us explain to students why using a highlighter and reviewing notes isn’t enough to achieve deep understanding. But what happens when your attention is interrupted by stress, sometimes exacerbated by mental health challenges? Join a discussion with the Office of Academic Planning and Advising to explore these questions.

This is part of the Academic Coaching TLC Workshop & Seminar Series

January 24, 2022 ASSESStivus

Schedule and recordings from virtual ASSESStivus presentations held at the end of January 2022. Keynote address: "Teaching in and beyond the Pandemic: Empathetic, Inclusive Pedagogical Approaches that Center our Students *and* Ourselves," by Dr. Josh Eyler, Director of Faculty Development and Director of the ThinkForward QEP at the University of Mississippi, author of How Humans Learn.

Fall Semester 2021

December 13-16, 2021 RISE Up Course: How Faculty Can Respond to the Challenges of Our Time

Who: Campus Compact of NY & PA is offering a FREE online workshop focused on helping faculty and staff create community engaged learning experiences around climate change and food insecurity with Middlebury College's Dr. Jon Isham.

Description: With our planet in crisis and communities being impacted by growing challenges, higher education is called to action to take the lead in addressing two of the world’s most pressing social issues: Climate Change and Food Insecurity. In service to the highest ideals of democracy, faculty are well positioned to help prepare students to address complex global problems. To help prepare faculty for this vital role, Campus Compact of NY & PA is offering a timely one-week virtual course with three live sessions stemming from Maine Campus Compact's Campuses for Environmental Stewardship (CES) program. This course will bring together faculty participants to consider ways to implement community-engaged teaching/learning while addressing many critical topics.

December 10, 2021 WOW Your Audience: Presentation Best Practices

Presenter:  Jamie Heron, SUNY Online Program Manager, SUNY Center for Professional Development  

Description: Part of SUNY Center for Professional Development Week. Are you struggling to simplify your slide deck? Do you feel that your presentation doesn't connect with the audience? Virtual presentations don't have to be long and boring! With a little help and reminders of how to best frame your story, you can breathe new life into your presentations and wow your peers. 

Bio:  Jamie Heron (she/hers) is the SUNY Online Program Manager at the SUNY Center for Professional Development. In her role as Program Manager, Jamie works to provide professional development programming for SUNY Online stakeholders, SUNY administration, and associated SUNY communities of practice. Prior to taking the position with the CPD, Jamie worked as an instructional designer and professional development coordinator at SUNY Broome Community College for nine years. In 2015 Jamie was awarded the SUNY Chancellor’s Award for Excellence in Professional Service. You can connect with Jamie on LinkedIn at https://www.linkedin.com/in/jamieheron/.

December 9, 2021 What Does an Inclusive Teacher Look Like? A Panel Discussion

Presenter:  Eileen MacAvery Kane, SUNY Rockland Community College, Stephanie Malmberg, SUNY Broome, Christopher Price, SUNY Center for Professional Development and David Wolf, SUNY Schenectady County Community College  

Description: Part of SUNY Center for Professional Development Week. A thriving, inclusive environment is a shared responsibility on campus, but what are instructors actually doing to make this a reality? There are many articles that underscore the need for a more inclusive learning environment, but what does that look like in practice? Join our panel of instructors from the SUNY Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion in Teaching and Learning Certificate Program to hear their strategies for making sure all students have an equitable chance at learning.

Bio:  Eileen MacAvery Kane has over 30 years' experience as an artist, graphic designer, and art educator. She received her MFA in Graphic Design from Savannah College of Art and Design. She is currently serving as Art Dept. Chair and Coordinator of the Graphic Design program at Rockland Community College where she teaches courses in Graphic Design, Typography, Digital Imaging and Digital Art. Her classes include COIL (Collaborative Online International Learning) projects and she and her students have collaborated with universities across the globe. She is a big proponent of Service Learning and projects in her classes often serve the local community. She has taught online for Berkeley College and the Art Institute of Pittsburgh. She is author and designer of the books East End Stories, Teacup Secrets, and Ethics: A Graphic Designer’s Field Guide, and the blogs ethicsingraphicdesign.org and chakraspirit.com. She is NYSCA grant recipient and Fulbright Scholar.

Bio:  Stephanie Malmberg is a Staff Associate and faculty member at SUNY Broome. As part of her current role as a professional development facilitator, she is collaborating on professional development opportunities for faculty and staff that are rooted in critical and culturally relevant and sustaining pedagogies. She is an adjunct lecturer in the Department of Human Development at Binghamton University and teaches courses that explore human rights issues in American and global education systems and human development across the lifespan, challenging historical, normative, and essentialized theories in favor of a more culturally informed and contextualized understanding. She is a Ph.D. candidate in the College of Community and Public Affairs at Binghamton University, and her research agenda is informed by issues of access and equity in higher education; her research seeks to bridge the gap between theory and practice in the creation of culturally relevant and sustaining pedagogical practices within community college classrooms.

Bio:  Christopher Price is the Academic Programs Manager for the State University of New York (SUNY) Center for Professional Development (CPD). At the CPD, Chris designs and implements professional development programs for faculty and staff both in and outside SUNY. He is an active member of the Professional and Organization Development (POD) Network serving as a member of the Core Committee in 2020-2022, Chair of the Professional Development Committee in 2018-19, and Chair of the 2017 Institute for New Faculty Developers. Prior to his position at the CPD, Chris was Director of the Center for Excellence in Learning and Teaching (CELT) at SUNY Brockport for 12 years. He started working at Brockport after receiving his PhD in Political Science from the University at Albany in 2004. Chris continues to teach online for Brockport as an instructor in the Master and Bachelor of Arts in Liberal Studies programs. He has been invited to give a keynote address or presentation over twenty times at conferences and campuses across the U.S. Teaching, learning, and educational development workshops and presentations Chris has conducted include discussion-based teaching, communicating effectively with students, collaborative learning, academic integrity, teaching with technology, course design and using critical reflection to improve teaching and learning. In 2013, he received the SUNY Chancellor’s Award for Excellence in Professional Service.

Bio:  David Wolf is currently the Teaching and Learning Specialist for Schenectady County Community College. In three years at the college he has developed faculty training courses in many modes of presentation, in instructional design, pedagogy, accessibility, and Universal Design for Learning. He has developed and oversees a voice-over internship for students that offers applied learning assignments that produce professional quality voice-over for instructional video that is available to the public. With over twenty years of higher education experience, and three years in the private sector, David has overseen the development of over 150 online courses with 53 of these offered in at least 11 different languages. His background in graphic art, animation, cognitive science, and education gives him a unique perspective on teaching and learning. An active researcher, David has several publications and presents locally and internationally, on topics such as Using Interactive Tools to Enhance Language Learning in an Online Environment; Engaging students in online courses through the use of mobile technology; and Assessing the Pedagogical Effectiveness and Student Preference of Publisher Digital Content Presentation in Online Literature and Writing Instruction.

December 8, 2021 Taking the Temperature of Faculty and Staff: How Are You Doing? 

Who: Dave Parfitt (Teaching & Learning Center) and Laura Swanson (Student Health & Counseling)

Description: This is an ongoing series to see how you, our faculty and staff colleagues, are doing this semester. We intend for these sessions to provide an opportunity for faculty and staff to connect, be seen and heard, feel less alone, feel valued, and know where you can go to get help if needed.

Previous discussion themes included challenges with finding space/time for self-care, maintaining morale, and building trust. Please consider coming to any of these gatherings to engage in authentic conversation with your peers. As Belonging is one of our college’s refreshed values, we hope these conversations lead to a culture where people feel respected and can ultimately create a network of support.

December 8, 2021 Self-Care as Professional Development

Presenter:  Kelly Williamson, Community Manager, SUNY CPD and Eileen Angelini, Ph.D., Associate Dean, School for Graduate Studies, Empire State College

Description: Part of SUNY Center for Professional Development Week. A well-balanced, and healthy team member is a high-performing one. An investment in "loving" yourself can resonate throughout your career and personal life. It can also help you to jump-start your ability to focus on long-term planning.
Not only can self-care make us healthier, but it can help us attune to our authentic selves, allowing us to expand our attention to a wide set of emotions, relationships and resources. Self-care results in better communication, feeling less effects of stress, and allows us to be more present for your colleagues, students, and families. This webinar will highlight various self-care strategies and will provide you with a toolbox of activities to use throughout the years.
The second half of our presentation will include the practice of Chair Yoga, reminding us that movement and stretching are important as many of us are working longer hours in order to deal with the demands of the pandemic. Chair yoga is one solution that will bring increased circulation and exercise into our daily routines. Other benefits include improving flexibility, relieving cramps and stiffness, and creating a happy mental state.

Bio:  Kelly Williamson is the Community Manager at the SUNY Center for Professional Development and oversees the adoption and engagement of the SUNY Workplace community. Kelly is a three-time SUNY graduate, most recently earning her Advanced Graduate Certificate in Project Management from Empire State College. She also holds a BA in Public Relations from SUNY Oswego and an AAS in Business Administration from Morrisville State College. Previously she was the Coordinator of Public Relations and Alumni Communications at Morrisville State College. She lives in Canastota, NY, with her family and two dogs.

Bio:  Eileen M. Angelini, Ph.D., received her B.A. in French from Middlebury College (Middlebury, VT) and her M.A. and Ph.D. in French Studies from Brown University (Providence, RI). She is currently Associate Dean of the School for Graduate Studies at SUNY Empire State College. As Associate Dean, Dr. Angelini leads the academic operations of the School for Graduate Studies. Her primary duties and responsibilities include, but are not limited to: Direct supervision of the school’s faculty in Business, Management and Leadership (BML), Education (ED), and Graduate Liberal Arts and Science (GLAS); Development of new degree and certificate programs; Oversight of faculty recruitment, professional development, and review; Collaboration with the Dean and faculty on academic program review and accreditation; Work with academic division chairs and faculty on policies and processes to ensure course quality; and, Participation with key stakeholders on strategic initiatives and budget planning. She also serves on the SUNY Empire Presidential Task Force to Enhance Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion. A life-long athlete and certified advanced exercise instructor, she lives in Porter Corners, NY with her incredible husband, beautiful daughter, and two adorable cats.

December 7, 2021 Leadership Sprint: Collaboration Across Teams - The Role of Operations

Presenter:  Beth Berlin, Chief Operating Officer, SUNY System Administration  

Description: Cross-functional collaboration is often heralded as the mecca of collaboration and growth, but what role does the operations team play? Navigating policies and procedures associated with formal roles may sometimes come across as stymieing progress when it really isn't the case. During this Leadership Sprint, we will discuss how to successfully foster greater collaboration while leveraging your management role.  

Bio:  Beth Berlin joined SUNY System Administration as Chief Operating Officer in December 2020. Prior to joining System, Ms. Berlin joined SUNY Empire State College in December 2019 as Executive Vice President for Administration and Chief Operating Officer and was named officer-in-charge in August 2020. Berlin brings extensive experience in education leadership, having served since 2013 as executive deputy commissioner of NYSED, before being named interim commissioner in 2019. She also previously served as acting commissioner in 2015. In that role, she managed the day-to-day operations of the Education Department, overseeing more than 700 school districts with 3.2 million students. Berlin provides leadership, coordination, and support as the SUNY system fulfills its critical mission of delivering flexible, individualized, high-quality education for students across our 64 campuses.

December 6, 2021 Leadership Sprint: Building a Great Culture and COVID-19

Presenter:  Laurie Fox, Director of Educational Technology, Computing & Information Technology, SUNY Geneseo

Description: Part of SUNY Center for Professional Development Week. If someone were to ask you, "What's your work culture like now?", what would your answer be? The current pandemic has put stress on our cultural norms and forced many to adapt quickly, with no plan for the future. As offices begin to "return to normal," there is an opportunity to not only capitalize on professional growth and technological advances but to also address pre-COVID ideals that need improvement. 

Bio:  Laurie Fox is SUNY Geneseo's Director of Educational Technology. Her responsibilities include classroom technology, instructional support for using technology in teaching and learning, LMS administration and support, campus technology training, and digital media services. Laurie is a frequent presenter on topics that include leadership, project management, campus communication, and productivity and time management. At Geneseo, she also teaches an online Extreme Learning course on Digital Fluency: Productivity Tools.

November 23, 2021 Taking the Temperature of Faculty and Staff: How Are You Doing?

Who: Dave Parfitt (Teaching & Learning Center) and Laura Swanson (Student Health & Counseling)

Description: This is an ongoing series to see how you, our faculty and staff colleagues, are doing this semester. We intend for these sessions to provide an opportunity for faculty and staff to connect, be seen and heard, feel less alone, feel valued, and know where you can go to get help if needed.

Previous discussion themes included challenges with finding space/time for self-care, maintaining morale, and building trust. Please consider coming to any of these gatherings to engage in authentic conversation with your peers. As Belonging is one of our college’s refreshed values, we hope these conversations lead to a culture where people feel respected and can ultimately create a network of support.

November 19, 2021 What Making Courses Accessible Means to Geneseo Students

Who: Dr. Amy Fisk, Assistant Dean for Accessibility, Kelleigh Larsson, Accessibility Coordinator, and Student Accessibility Advocates

Description: How can faculty and students place accessibility at the forefront at Geneseo? This workshop is designed to create a dialogue between the Office of Accessibility and faculty on how to make their courses and teaching dynamics accessible to students with disabilities. Student Accessibility Advocates will share their experiences and perspectives on how faculty can do their part in making our campus inclusive to all students.

November 18, 2021 Tangible Techniques for Time Management: Support Students through Overwhelm

Who: Leah Houk and Heather Wilhelm Routenberg, Dean of Academic Planning and Advising Office

Description: Have you ever been burdened by an overflowing to do list? Your coaching students and ASI mentees have too! In this workshop we’ll discuss active techniques students can apply to manage their time effectively in advance of final papers and exams. Join us for techniques to support your students at one of the most stressful times of the semester and perhaps you’ll apply some of these strategies to your own practice!

November 4, 2021 "I think I can, I think I can": Harnessing the Power of Growth Mindset

Who: Leah Houk and Heather Wilhelm Routenberg, Dean of Academic Planning and Advising Office

Description: Academic coaching brown bag series. DAPA's Academic Coaching Program is hosting a brown bag *virtual* luncheon series that explores student support, wellness, and academic success from a variety of vantage points. We encourage you to participate in as many sessions as you wish and to invite your colleagues along! These sessions are not restricted only to our coaching and ASI mentors and all are optional.
Bring your ideas, questions for conversation and of course... your lunch!

October 21, 2021 Understanding the Role of Implicit Bias and Stereotype Threat in Coaching & Mentoring Relationships

Who: robbie routenberg, Chief Diversity Officer 

Description: In this workshop we'll explore the role of implicit bias and stereotype threat on the coaching/mentoring relationship. These factors can disproportionately affect students from underrepresented backgrounds. The conversation will include strategies for how to reduce barriers to student success and wellbeing. Please come ready to engage, add your experiences and ask questions!

October 20, 2021 Undergraduate Research at Scale: What if the treatment is a CURE?

Who: Dr. Erin Dolan, University of Georgia

Description: National calls to improve undergraduate STEM education have emphasized the importance of undergraduate research experiences. Course-based Undergraduate Research Experiences, or CUREs, involve groups of students in addressing research problems or questions in the context of a class, and have been proposed as scalable ways of involving undergraduates in research. This seminar will offer a definition of CUREs, describe what makes them distinctive from other learning experiences, outline the state of knowledge about CURE effectiveness, and highlight results from the Freshman Research Initiative at the University of Texas at Austin as a unique and highly impactful CURE model.

Erin is a neuroscientist by training, teaches intro bio at UGA, and studies science research as a learning environment as a Georgia Athletic Association Professor for Innovative Science Education.

Click here for slides from this presentation

October 14, 2021 Holistic Wellness: Utilizing Campus Supports 

Who: Leah Houk and Heather Wilhelm Routenberg, Dean of Academic Planning and Advising Office

Description: Academic coaching brown bag series. DAPA's Academic Coaching Program is hosting a brown bag *virtual* luncheon series that explores student support, wellness, and academic success from a variety of vantage points. We encourage you to participate in as many sessions as you wish and to invite your colleagues along! These sessions are not restricted only to our coaching and ASI mentors and all are optional.
Bring your ideas, questions for conversation and of course... your lunch!

September 30, 2021 Metacognition: Strategies for Deeper Learning & Success

Who: Leah Houk and Heather Wilhelm Routenberg, Dean of Academic Planning and Advising Office

Description: Academic coaching brown bag series. DAPA's Academic Coaching Program is hosting a brown bag *virtual* luncheon series that explores student support, wellness, and academic success from a variety of vantage points. We encourage you to participate in as many sessions as you wish and to invite your colleagues along! These sessions are not restricted only to our coaching and ASI mentors and all are optional.
Bring your ideas, questions for conversation and of course... your lunch!

 September 29, 2021 Taking the Temperature of Faculty and Staff: How Are You Doing?

Who: Dave Parfitt (Teaching & Learning Center) and Laura Swanson (Student Health & Counseling)

Description: How are you, our faculty and staff colleagues, doing this semester? What are you seeing in and out of the classroom? While there have been efforts to help faculty and staff anticipate student needs, now that the semester is in full swing, we would like to explore how those needs are showing up in actuality, and how they are affecting you.

We invite you to participate in a TLC session designed to explore how you and your peers are doing in order to better understand your specific experiences. Please consider coming to one of these sessions to share, listen, and hopefully feel more connected to one another. We are offering two options for participation: in-person or Zoom, and we welcome you to select the option that you are most comfortable with. 

Both sessions will cover the same topics, including: current faculty/staff experiences, unexpected challenges and rewards, and options for faculty/staff support. Information gathered in these sessions will guide future programming, as this is the first TLC session in a series we are calling Teaching for Wellbeing. This series will feature wellbeing-promoting practices to help faculty and staff apply techniques that support wellbeing and learning both in and out of the classroom.

September 23, 2021 Supporting Student Autonomy: Fostering Self-Determination/Intrinsic Motivation

Who: Jennifer Katz, Ph.D, Professor, Psychology

Description: This workshop will describe theory and practice to support a student-centered approach to advising/coaching/mentorship. The educator-student relationship will be described as an opportunity to promote self-determination. In addition, relevant practices from motivational interviewing will be explored.

Background reading from "Think Again" by Adam Grant

Powerpoint slides from presentation

September 21, 2021 Enhancing the Student Experience

Who: Moderated by Beth McMurtrie - Senior Reporter The Chronicle of Higher Education; Jenae Cohn, Ph.D., Director of Academic Technology, Information Resources & Technology, California State University, Sacramento; Flower Darby, Co-author of "Small Teaching Online: Applying Learning Science in Online Classes"; Joshua R. Eyler, Ph.D., Director of Faculty Development, University of Mississippi; Mike Truong, Ph.D., Director of Digital Learning and Associate Professor, Azusa Pacific University

Description: After more than a year spent largely in virtual classrooms, learning remotely from home, students crave campus life and the rich academic experience that goes with it. What does that look like now? And what lessons have colleges learned about creating an effective learning experience in such an uncertain environment?

Chronicle of Higher Education Webinar Recording

August 26, 2021 Impact of Remote Learning on our Students with Disabilities

Who: Amy Fisk, Psy.D, Assistant Dean for Accessibility, SUNY Geneseo Office of Accessibility Services and Testing Center

Rebecca Mushtare, Assistant Professor, SUNY Oswego Art

Description: During this session Dr. Amy Fisk (Geneseo) and Rebecca Mushtare (Oswego) will share excerpts from interviews conducted with SUNY Oswego and SUNY Geneseo students with disabilities collected during 2020 about the impact remote and online learning has had on their academic experience. They will offer how a Universal Design for Learning (UDL) framework supports students generally, and students with disabilities specifically. Finally, recommendations on helpful UDL tools and teaching practices will be discussed.

Slides from Presentation

Resource Guide: Universal Design for Learning & Our Students