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Jeffrey Peterson

Associate Professor of Chemistry, Department Chair
ISC 331A
585-245-5699
petersonj@geneseo.edu
he/him/his
Image
Portrait of Jeffrey Peterson

Jeffrey Peterson has been a member of the Geneseo faculty since 2008.

Research Interests

The Peterson group is focused on two main goals: (1) chemical synthesis of novel nanoparticles (NPs) and (2) the development of a full understanding of their optical and electronic properties through innovative spectroscopic methods. The group has a special interest in semiconductor quantum dots, inorganic particles 10,000x smaller than the width of a human hair that possess unique optical properties and that have applications in renewable energy and biological imaging. Active projects in the group include the application of single molecule spectroscopy methods to investigate the impact of NP shape on fluorescence blinking and the optimization SiO2/Au core/shell structures for the production of steam from solar radiation at room temperature. 

Office Hours

Wed 1:00pm-2:30pm
Thurs1:00pm-2:30pm
or by appointment

Curriculum Vitae

Education

  • NRC Postdoctoral Fellow, JILA/NIST, Boulder, CO

  • Ph. D. Chemistry, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY

  • B.S. Chemistry, Wheaton College, Chicago, IL

Classes

  • CHEM 209: Intermediate Chemistry Lab

    This course serves as a bridge to advanced chemistry laboratory courses at Geneseo. Students will learn how to perform quantitative measurements and techniques for the synthesis and characterization of compounds. Safety in the laboratory environment an experimental design are emphasized.

  • CHEM 322: Physical Chemistry II

    A continuation of CHEM 320. Covers two areas of modern physical chemistry: quantum chemistry and chemical kinetics. Topics in quantum chemistry include waves and particles, postulates of quantum mechanics, Schroedinger equation, applications with exact solutions, approximation methods, atomic structure, molecular structure, and spectroscopy. Topics in chemical kinetics include empirical laws, reaction mechanisms, and reaction rate theories.