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Cynthia Klima

Associate Professor of German
Welles 206C
585-245-6341
klima@geneseo.edu

Cynthia Klima has been a member of the Geneseo faculty since 1993.

Office Hours - Fall 2021

Tuesdays 9:00-10:00am (office 206C)
Wednesday 10:00am-11:00am - Zoom
(And by appointment)

Curriculum Vitae

Education

  • Ph.D., German, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1995

  • M.A., German, University of Oklahoma, 1986

  • B.A., Russian, University of Oklahoma, 1983

More About Me

Research Interests

Her interests lie in German-Czech-Jewish relations, political relations in Europe, cultural history of Central Europe, Russian literature and cultural history, and the Germans and Jews of Prague. She has written numerous articles on Jewish contribution to culture in Central Europe, historical articles and book reviews on German, Czech, Russian and Jewish themes. Her translation of Paul Leppin's Blaugast: A Novel of Decline was published in November 2007 by Twisted Spoon Press in Prague, Czech Republic. In addition, Dr. Klima is involved with Humanities/Central European Studies and Summer Study Abroad to Prague, Czech Republic. She is the coordinator for both the German minor and Central and Eastern European Studies minor.

Other Interests

  • Study abroad in Prague/Vienna/Budapest
  • Yoga and pilates
  • Central European literature and culture
  • Sewing, crochet and embroidery
  • Traveling

Classes

  • GERM 213: Intermed German GrammCult&Comm

    An exploration of cultural and contemporary topics via a variety of materials (such as print, film, internet, and/or music) and peer-oriented activities that enable students to continue developing the four language skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing. This course must be taken in residence.

  • INTD 105: Wrtg Sem:The Twentieth Century

    Writing Seminar is a course focusing on a specific topic while emphasizing writing practice and instruction, potentially taught by any member of the College faculty. Because this is primarily a course in writing, reading assignments will be briefer than in traditional topic courses, and students will prove their understanding of the subject matter through writing compositions rather than taking examinations.